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I'm trying to figure out how to implement a function in a tree node which returns all its descendant leaves (whether direct or indirect). However, I don't want to pass a container in which the leaf nodes will be put recursively (the tree could be huge), instead I'd like to use a generator to iterate through the tree. I've tried a few approaches but none of them worked so far. This one is the closest I've come to a possible solution:

    public interface ITreeNode
    {
        IEnumerable<ITreeNode> EnumerateLeaves();            
    }

    class Leaf : ITreeNode
    {
        public IEnumerable<ITreeNode> EnumerateLeaves()
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }

    class Branch : ITreeNode
    {
        private List<ITreeNode> m_treeNodes = new List<ITreeNode>();

        public IEnumerable<ITreeNode> EnumerateLeaves()
        {
            foreach( var node in m_treeNodes )
            {
                if( node is Leaf )
                    yield return node;
                else
                    node.EnumerateLeaves();
            }
        }
    }

But this is not working either. What am I doing wrong? Seems like calling .EnumerateLeaves recursively won't work if there's a yield statement in the same function.

Any help would be very much appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Edit: I forgot to mention that a branch can have either leaves or branches as children, hence the recursion.

share|improve this question
    
Isn't this a .NET question? –  Joshua Swink Dec 30 '08 at 22:07
    
Yes - retagged. 'Programming' tag is redundant on a programming site. =) –  Erik Forbes Dec 30 '08 at 22:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here's how you should implement Branch.EnumerateLeaves:

public IEnumerable<ITreeNode> EnumerateLeaves()
{
    foreach( var node in m_treeNodes )
    {
        if( node is Leaf )
            yield return node;
        else
        {
            foreach (ITreeNode childNode in node.EnumerateLeaves())
                yield return childNode;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That won't work either since a Branch could have another braches as children, and that's why I used recursion. –  Trap Dec 30 '08 at 20:42
    
Let me edit the answer. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Dec 30 '08 at 20:44
    
There, that should do the trick, now it will use recursion correctly. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Dec 30 '08 at 20:44
    
Heh - I posted this just as you edited your answer. –  Erik Forbes Dec 30 '08 at 20:45
    
So basically the solution is to create a new generator every time you go deeper in the recursion? –  Trap Dec 30 '08 at 21:21

lassevk is right - one potential issue with that method, however, is that recursively calling into enumerables can yield O(n^2) performance. If this is an issue, then you should instead factor the recursion out and use an internal stack.

public IEnumerable<ITreeNode> EnumerateLeaves()
{
    Stack<ITreeNode> workStack = new Stack<ITreeNode>(m_treeNodes);

    while(workStack.Count > 0) {
        var current = workStack.Pop();
        if(current is Leaf)
            yield return current;
        else {
            for(n = 0; n < current.m_treeNodes.Count; n++) {
                workStack.Push(current.m_treeNodes[n]);
            }
        }
    }
}

This should perform the same function, without the recursion.

Edit: Daniel Plaisted posted in a comment about a bigger problem with recursively calling Enumerators, summed up in a post on the MSDN Blogs regarding iterators. Thanks Daniel. =)

Another Edit: Always remember that code simplicity can be more important than performance, especially if you expect others to maintain your code. If you don't expect your tree to grow very large, use the recursion method lassevk outlined in his answer.

share|improve this answer
    
The GC isn't the biggest problem with recursion, it's the fact that on each iteration it has to walk down the "tree" of enumerators from the top. This can make the runtime increase dramatically. See blogs.msdn.com/wesdyer/archive/2007/03/23/… –  Daniel Plaisted Dec 30 '08 at 21:58
    
That's very true - though I couldn't think of how to phrase it. Thanks for the link - very helpful. =) –  Erik Forbes Dec 30 '08 at 22:06

The other answers are correct, but the pattern of having a yield return inside a foreach loop with a recursive call will make the running time to iterate through the tree something like O(number of nodes * average depth of a node). See this blog post for more details about the problem.

Here is an attempt at a generator which is efficient in both runtime and memory usage:

class Node
{
    List<Node> _children;

    public bool IsLeaf { get { return _children.Count == 0; } }

    public IEnumerable<Node> Children { get { return _children; } }

    public IEnumerable<Node> EnumerateLeaves()
    {
        if (IsLeaf)
        {
            yield return this;
            yield break;
		}

        var path = new Stack<IEnumerator<Node>>();

        path.Push(Children.GetEnumerator());

        while(!path.Empty)
        {
            var cur = path.Pop();
            if (cur.MoveNext())
            {
                path.Push(cur);
                if (cur.IsLeaf)
                {
                    yield return cur;
                }
                else
                {
                    path.Push(cur.Children.GetEnumerator());
                }
            }

        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain how this is better than O(n^2)? I'm not seeing it. –  Erik Forbes Dec 30 '08 at 22:22
    
It's O(n log n). In the link you provided, the recursion depth was n. In a tree, it's log n in an average case. –  recursive Dec 30 '08 at 22:32
    
I updated it to state that the run time of the recursive method is O(number of nodes * average depth of a node). This one should have a runtime of just O(number of nodes), which is the same as Erik's. This one theoretically has less memory use. –  Daniel Plaisted Dec 31 '08 at 0:08

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