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I want to be able to pass a method as a parameter.

eg..

//really dodgy code
public void PassMeAMethod(string text, Method method)
{
  DoSomething(text);
  // call the method
  //method1();
  Foo();
}

public void methodA()
{
  //Do stuff
}


public void methodB()
{
  //Do stuff
}

public void Test()
{
  PassMeAMethod("calling methodA", methodA)
  PassMeAMethod("calling methodB", methodB)
}

How can I do this?

share|improve this question
    
You should be able to do it with delegates. –  jimplode Oct 25 '10 at 14:20
    
Which version of the .NET framework are you running? –  Gavin Miller Oct 25 '10 at 14:22
    
3.5, can someone show me using the example above? thanks –  raklos Oct 25 '10 at 14:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You need to use a delegate, which is a special class that represents a method. You can either define your own delegate or use one of the built in ones, but the signature of the delegate must match the method you want to pass.

Defining your own:

public delegate int MyDelegate(Object a);

This example matches a method that returns an integer and takes an object reference as a parameter.

In your example, both methodA and methodB take no parameters have return void, so we can use the built in Action delegate class.

Here is your example modified:

public void PassMeAMethod(string text, Action method)
{
  DoSomething(text);
  // call the method
  method();    
}

public void methodA()
{
//Do stuff
}


public void methodB()
{
//Do stuff
}

public void Test()
{
//Explicit
PassMeAMethod("calling methodA", new Action(methodA));
//Implicit
PassMeAMethod("calling methodB", methodB);

}

As you can see, you can either use the delegate type explicitly or implicitly, whichever suits you.

Steve

share|improve this answer

Use Action<T>

Example:

public void CallThis(Action x)
{
    x();
}

CallThis(() => { /* code */ });
share|improve this answer

Or Func<>

Func<int, string> func1 = (x) => string.Format("string = {0}", x);
PassMeAMethod("text", func1);

public void PassMeAMethod(string text, Func<int, string> func1)
{
  Console.WriteLine( func1.Invoke(5) );
}
share|improve this answer

Delegates are the language feature that you're going to need to use to accomplish what you're trying to do.

Here's an example using the code you have above (using the Action delegate as a shortcut):

//really dodgy code
public void PassMeAMethod(string text, Action method)
{
    DoSomething(text);
    method(); // call the method using the delegate
    Foo();
}

public void methodA()
{
    Console.WriteLine("Hello World!");
}    

public void methodB()
{
    Console.WriteLine("42!");
}

public void Test()
{
    PassMeAMethod("calling methodA", methodA)
    PassMeAMethod("calling methodB", methodB)
}
share|improve this answer

Building on what BrunoLM did, as that example was brief.

//really dodgy code
public void PassMeAMethod(string text, Action method)
{
  DoSomething(text);
  method();
  Foo();
}

// Elsewhere...

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    PassMeAMethod("foo", () =>
        {
            // Method definition here.
        }
    );

    // Or, if you have an existing method in your class, I believe this will work
    PassMeAMethod("bar", this.SomeMethodWithNoParams);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you use this in a static void? –  Daniel Brunner Sep 8 at 18:26

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