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I am using CSS Sprite Generator to create sprites for a web page I am working on, but it doesn't seem to work, and I don't know why...I guess it's something obvious but..!

So, I picked up 3 images, zipped, generated the PNG file (I checked out the result it is seems fine) and I got the following css classes back:

.sprite-welcom1 { background-position: 0 -30px; } 
.sprite-welcom3 { background-position: 0 -109px; } 
.sprite-3 { background-position: 0 -188px; }

So here is the HTML I am testing on, and for some reason all I get is a nice blank page:

<html>
<head>
    <style>
    .sprite-welcom1 { background-position: 0 -30px; } 
    .sprite-welcom3 { background-position: 0 -109px; } 
    .sprite-3 { background-position: 0 -188px; } 

    .sprite-bg {
       background: url(csg-495a902b04181.png) no-repeat top left;
    }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div class="sprite-bg sprite-3"></div>
</body>
</html>

Any tips?

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9 Answers

Don't use a generator. Take the time to do it yourself from scratch. Then next time you use this method, you'll know what to look for when something has gone wrong and you'll answer your own question, and heck, maybe someone else's on Stack Overflow.

This generator isn't producing any meaningful class names for your styles, which means if you go to edit them later you're not going to know two classes from Tuesday what's going on unless you've memorized the numbers. Meaningful names will save you headaches when you return to your stylesheet later on.

Open up Photoshop, GIMP, or almost any modern image editing software. Make sure your program has the rulers option switched on, and measure your element's background image coordinates this way. In the absence of rulers - which is probably a rarity, you could always fudge around with the MeasureIt Firefox extension and the .png opened in a tab.

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+1 good advice, the first paragraph says it all –  jeroen Feb 6 '09 at 14:18
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Define a width and height for <div class="sprite-bg sprite-3">.

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Your .sprite-bg rule for background-position, set as part of the composite rule for background (the top left part), has higher precedence than the stand-alone background-position setting for .sprite-3 because it appears later in the stylesheet.

Place the rule for .sprite-bg first.

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Doug's right. You can catch these type of problems by using your browser's developer tools. On Windows, Firefox, IE, and Chrome all use F12 as the hot-key to bring up the developer tools. –  Anthony Topper Dec 8 '11 at 14:52
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the div is empty. put something inside. like space (&nbsp;).

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You have to declare a height and width for the div element. That's it.

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Hrm, not quite sure what you're trying to achieve here. The multiclassing seems a bit messy. I've posted my method of spritemaps below, see if this does what you need. Usually this involves a combination of elements, the most common being an unordered list with links for navigation, but for this purpose it's just divs.

Also don't forget the order of background-position. background-position: |top| |left|;

That's screwed me up a couple of times. Finally, A List Apart has a great article on Sprite Maps (http://www.alistapart.com/articles/sprites/)

<html>
<head>
    <style>
    .sprite-container div {
       background: url(csg-495a902b04181.png) top left no-repeat;
       width: 20px; //width is neccessary
       height: 20px; //height is neccessary
    }

    .sprite-3 { background-position: 0 -188px; } 
    .sprite-4 { background-position: -20px -188px; }

    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div class="sprite-container">
      <div class="sprite-3"></div>
      <div class="sprite-4"></div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
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I'd consider extra divs worse then multi-classing... Multi-classing is great for removing duplication. –  Tim K. Dec 30 '08 at 23:02
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You could check an article of mine about CSS Sprites:
http://emiajnet.blogspot.com/2008/12/optimize-your-pages-using-css-sprites.html
Hope this helps.

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As others have mentioned, your sprite-bg element needs to have either some content to give it a height / width, or have those properties specified in the css, thusly:

.sprite-bg {
  background: url(csg-495a902b04181.png) no-repeat top left;
  width: 100px; /* (or whatever the width should be) */
  height: 100px; /* (or whatever the height should be) */
}

As someone else mentioned, I'd move the rules for the .sprite-welcom1, .sprite-welcom3 and .sprite-3 to beneath the main .sprite-bg in the stylesheet.

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For some reason, Firefox 3 sometimes wants 2 classes in the CSS Selector to make the sprite map work. My hunch is that the rules of specificity are causing problems while the sprite map loads. By adding the additional class, it works correctly.

/* Bad  */ .childClass2 { background-position: -10px -20px; }
/* Good */ .parentClass1 .childClass2 { background-position: -10px -20px; }

It's always good to “namespace” your CSS with a parentClass, to avoid unexpectedly styling a DOM tag someplace else. Here are some additional enhancements to everyones ideas from above.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" 
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">

<HTML xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <style type="text/css">
    .sprite-container div {
       background: transparent url(//www.yourDomain.com/csg-495a902b04181.png) no-repeat scroll 0 0;
       width: 200px; /* width is necessary */
       height: 20px; /* height is necessary */
    }
    .sprite-container .sprite-3 { background-position: 0 -188px; } 
    .sprite-container .sprite-4 { background-position: -20px -188px; }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div class="sprite-container">
      <div class="sprite-3"></div> 
      <div class="sprite-4"></div> 
      <!-- Empty divs are fine! Unless you *really* want text on top of
           your sprite map. :o) Btw: &shy; is invisible when a hyperlink
           is wrapped around it. &nbsp is not... it creates an 
           underscored hyperlink. Use &shy; which is a soft-hyphen.
       -->
    </div>
</body>
</html>

This code works in: IE 7, Firefox 3, Google Chrome 1, Opera 9 & Safari 3.

Tip: Avoiding http:// in the URL will allow the sprite map to be served up from both http:// and https:// connections.

(Scroll to the right to see the “no-repeat scroll 0 0;” )

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