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Are ordinary sql queries different from MS Access 2007 queries?

I have this simple query but it is not working in MS Access query (SQL View). What is wrong with this?

SELECT StudentSubject.*, Subject.*,Professor.*, Student.*, Church.*
FROM 
(

SELECT StudentSubject.*, Subject.*,Professor.* , Student.*
FROM 
 (

 SELECT  StudentSubject.*, Subject.*,Professor.* 
FROM
 StudentSubject 
LEFT JOIN Subject ON StudentSubject.SubjectID=Subject.SubjectID
 INNER JOIN Professor ON Subject.ProfessorID=Professor.ProfessorID

  ) 
  INNER JOIN Student ON StudentSubject.StudentID=Student.StudentID
) 
LEFT JOIN Church ON Student.ChurchID=Church.ChurchID;

I believe this would work if I was using MySQL/MSSQL(If I use alias and do it directly - this is the ouput of ms access sql designer)

I get syntax error on join operation. But MS Access doesn't point out which join.

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1  
What do you mean by "not working"? –  RedFilter Oct 25 '10 at 16:11
    
Yes, MS Access uses a TSQL syntax which differs slightly from SQL Server (in certain constructs) –  Mitch Wheat Oct 25 '10 at 16:13
    
@RedFilter I get "syntax error on join operation", If you search by substring there is no "not working" on my post @Mitch Wheat would you mind translating this to TSQL –  Aivan Monceller Oct 25 '10 at 16:16
1  
@geocine: It seems your substring matching algorithm is "not working" as well...you cheeky monkey. –  RedFilter Oct 25 '10 at 16:22
1  
Seems to me you need to alias your derived table subselects. I don't see how you could possible refer to tables in the top-level SELECT that are not in the top-level FROM. It's very, very ugly SQL and I can't figure out why you think you need to do it that way. That is, I just don't see any point in the derived tables. It just looks to me like you're doing nothing more than joining tables in the derived tables and I can't see why you can't do that all in one go. –  David-W-Fenton Oct 25 '10 at 18:22
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Are ordinary sql queries different from MS Access 2007 queries?

By "ordinary SQL" you probably mean entry level SQL-92 Standard SQL (whether you know it or not!)

As a whole, Access (ACE, Jet, whatever) is not compliant with SQL-92.

Specifically, Access's JOIN syntax is not compliant with SQL-92.

In SQL-92, one or more JOIN clauses can be enclosed together within parentheses to show precedence; where no parentheses are used all JOIN clauses will have the same precedence.

In Access, each JOIN clause must be enclosed on its own within parentheses, however all JOIN clauses will have the same precedence.

In other words, Access chokes on the Standard syntax and its own syntax is less expressive than the Standard's :(

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Thank you for the very detailed answer –  Aivan Monceller Oct 26 '10 at 17:27
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It is slightly different, but I don't think the query in the question would work on other DBs, either - there are references to table names in subqueries that aren't aliased with the matching table name.

Try this, instead:

SELECT StudentSubject.*, Subject.*,Professor.*, Student.*, Church.*
FROM  StudentSubject 
LEFT JOIN Subject ON StudentSubject.SubjectID=Subject.SubjectID
INNER JOIN Professor ON Subject.ProfessorID=Professor.ProfessorID
INNER JOIN Student ON StudentSubject.StudentID=Student.StudentID
LEFT JOIN Church ON Student.ChurchID=Church.ChurchID;

This may still return an error due to different columns having the same name - if so, you should replace .* above with only the required columns from each table, with appropriate column aliases.

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you're right, I edited this straight from MS Access. I have already tried you're answer before I posted the question however I get a weird error. Syntax error (missing operator) 'StudentSubject.SubjectID=Subject.SubjectID INNER JOIN Professor ON Subject.ProfessorID=Professor.ProfessorID INNER JOIN Student ON StudentSubject.StudentID=Student.StudentID LEFT JOIN Church ON Student.ChurchID=Church.Church' –  Aivan Monceller Oct 25 '10 at 16:24
    
@geocine, have you tried to replace .* with only the required columns from each table, with appropriate column aliases? Sometimes the returned error messages can be a bit misleading. –  Mark Bannister Oct 25 '10 at 16:31
    
Yes, thank you. However, I found the answer. –  Aivan Monceller Oct 25 '10 at 16:40
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Adding the parenthesis did the trick

SELECT Subject.SubjectName,Professor.ProfessorName,Church.ChurchName,Student.StudentName 
FROM  ((((StudentSubject LEFT JOIN Subject 
ON StudentSubject.SubjectID=Subject.SubjectID)
INNER JOIN Professor ON Subject.ProfessorID=Professor.ProfessorID)
INNER JOIN Student ON StudentSubject.StudentID=Student.StudentID)
LEFT JOIN Church ON Student.ChurchID=Church.ChurchID);
share|improve this answer
    
This isn't the same query as you posted in your question. It may very well return the same data, but it is much, much less convoluted than your original, with all its nested derived-table subqueries. –  David-W-Fenton Oct 27 '10 at 21:37
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