Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I have the following code:

typedef struct
{
    char **p;
} STRUCT;

int main()
{
    STRUCT s;
    *(s.p) = "hello";
    printf("%s\n", *(s.p));

    return 0;
}

which obviously doesn't work, but it should show what I want to do. How would I go about initialising, accessing, printing, etc the array of strings in the structure?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have two * where you want just one, I think. Try:

typedef struct
{
    char *p;
} STRUCT;

int main()
{
    STRUCT s;
    s.p = "hello";
    printf("%s\n", s.p);

    return 0;
}

If you do really want to have the double indirection, you need to allocate some space for the pointer you're dereferencing. *(s.p) in your original program dereferences an uninitialized pointer. In this case:

typedef struct
{
    char **p;
} STRUCT;

int main()
{
    STRUCT s;
    s.p = malloc(sizeof(char *));
    *(s.p) = "hello";
    printf("%s\n", *(s.p));
    free(s.p);
    return 0;
}

This second program allocates space for just one string pointer; if you want an array, just allocate the appropriate amount of space.

share|improve this answer

There is no array at the moment, but I assume you want to create one. You need to first allocate as many char *s as you want strings:

int main()
{
    STRUCT s;
    int N = 10; // number of strings you want
    s.p = (char **)malloc(N * sizeof(char *));
    s.p[0] = "hello";
    s.p[1] = "world";
    ...
    printf("%s\n", s.p[0]);
    free(s.p);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm but can a pointer not be considered an array as well? ie. with char** p, the first pointer points to a string and the second one points to the characters in the string. –  jon2512chua Oct 25 '10 at 17:24
    
@jon2512chua: An array can be considered as a pointer, not the other way round. You can't store anything using a pointer unless you allocate space for it, or make it point to an existing variable/array. –  casablanca Oct 25 '10 at 17:47
    
Ok got it thanks. –  jon2512chua Oct 25 '10 at 18:51

You're going to need to know how many strings are contained in the array, either by adding a count member to the struct or by using a NULL sentinel value. The following examples use the NULL sentinel:

Allocating and initializing:

STRUCT s;
s.p = malloc(sizeof *s.p * (number_of_strings + 1));
if (s.p)
{
  size_t i;
  for (i = 0; i < number_of_strings; i++)
  {
    s.p[i] = malloc(length_of_ith_string + 1);
    if (s.p[i])
      strcpy(s.p[i], ith_string);
  }
  s.p[i] = NULL;
}

for appropriate values of number_of_strings, length_of_ith_string, and ith_string.

Accessing/printing:

for (i = 0; s.p[i] != NULL; i++)
  printf("String %d: %s\n", i, s.p[i]);

Deallocating:

for (i = 0; s.[i] != NULL; i++)
  free(s.p[i]);
free(s.p);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.