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Hey, I have been asked to write a recursive binary search for my data structure class in university, but i'm having a slight problem. When i search for a number that is out of bounds (over 10 in this case) it throws an out of bounds exception. I understand why it's doing it, due to the array not having >10 spaces, but i don't know how to work around it. Any ideas?

The array that im searching is an ordered array 1 - 10 (index 0 - 9).

 public int recursiveBinarySearch(int[] anArray, int searchedNumber, int min, int max) {

    if (min > max)
        {
                System.out.println(searchedNumber + " is not present in tha array.");
                //return -1 to show that the value has not been found
        return -1;
        }
        // find the centre of the array
        int centre = (min + max) / 2;

    if (anArray[centre] == searchedNumber)
        {
                System.out.println(searchedNumber + " was found at index " + centre);
        return centre;
        }

        if (anArray[centre] < searchedNumber)
        {
        return recursiveBinarySearch(anArray, searchedNumber, centre+1, max);
        }

        return recursiveBinarySearch(anArray, searchedNumber, min, centre-1);

 }
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1  
binary search should not use / 2 it should use the bitwise >>. –  Woot4Moo Oct 25 '10 at 17:35
    
Actually it should use >>>. –  helpermethod Oct 25 '10 at 18:12
1  
Why? You don't care what the bits look like. You care about what the number is (and what is half of it). That type of optimization should be left to the compiler/jvm. –  ILMTitan Oct 25 '10 at 19:07
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
public int recursiveBinarySearch(...) {
    if (max >= array.length) {
        max = array.length - 1;
    }
    if (min < 0) {
        min = 0;
    }
    ... rest of the code
} 

PS Not to be a nagger, but I would also recommend using consistent indentation. Believe me, it helps greatly in writing bug-free programs.

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Thanks so much, that's exactly what i needed. As for the indentation, thanks for pointing it out, the rest of my program is indented.. just not this method for some reason. Thanks alot again. –  Rvddps Oct 25 '10 at 17:23
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I suppose it starts with min = 0 and max = 9, then it goes

min = 0, max = 9, c = (0+9 / 2) = 4
min = 5, max = 9, c = (6+9 / 2) = 7
min = 8, max = 9, c = (8+9 / 2) = 8
min = 9, max = 9, c = (9+9 / 2) = 9
min = 10, max = 9, ...

As you can see it gets over the bound, min = 10 will of course cause problems. To avoid that just widen the initial condition:

if (min > max || min > Array.length -1 || max < 0)
  // not found!

so that if your going over the array in any of two directions then the requested element won't be found.

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Why will it cause problems? He has the take care of that in if (min > max) –  codaddict Oct 25 '10 at 17:29
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