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I've created a simple test case exhibiting a strange behavior I've noticed in a larger code base I'm working on. This test case is below. I'm relying on the STL Map's "[ ]" operator to create a pointer to a struct in a map of such structs. In the test case below, the line...

TestStruct *thisTestStruct = &testStructMap["test"];

...gets me the pointer (and creates a new entry in the map). The weird thing I've noticed is that this line not only causes a new entry in the map to be created (because of the "[ ]" operator), but for some reason it causes the struct's destructor to be called two extra times. I'm obviously missing something - any help is much appreciated! Thanks!

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <map>

using namespace std;
struct TestStruct;

int main (int argc, char * const argv[]) {

    map<string, TestStruct> testStructMap;

    std::cout << "Marker One\n";

    //why does this line cause "~TestStruct()" to be invoked twice?
    TestStruct *thisTestStruct = &testStructMap["test"];

    std::cout << "Marker Two\n";

    return 0;
}

struct TestStruct{
    TestStruct(){
        std::cout << "TestStruct Constructor!\n";
    }

    ~TestStruct(){
        std::cout << "TestStruct Destructor!\n";
    }
};

the code above outputs the following...

/*
Marker One
TestStruct Constructor!             //makes sense
TestStruct Destructor!               //<---why?
TestStruct Destructor!               //<---god why?
Marker Two
TestStruct Destructor!               //makes sense
*/

...but I don't understand what causes the first two invocations of TestStruct's destructor? (I think the last destructor invocation makes sense because testStructMap is going out of scope.)

share|improve this question
    
The answer is below. But turn the optimization level as high as it will go and see how many copies get elided. –  Loki Astari Oct 25 '10 at 19:36
    
Further details about this question and the why behind it may be found in this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/26021118/… –  srm Sep 24 at 16:15

6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The functionality of std::map<>::operator[] is equivalent to

(*((std::map<>::insert(std::make_pair(x, T()))).first)).second

expression, as specified in the language specification. This, as you can see, involves default-constructing a temporary object of type T, copying it into a std::pair object, which is later copied (again) into the new element of the map (assuming it wasn't there already). Obviously, this will produce a few intermediate T objects. Destruction of these intermediate objects is what you observe in your experiment. You miss their construction, since you don't generate any feedback from copy-constructor of your class.

The exact number of intermediate objects might depend on compiler optimization capabilities, so the results may vary.

share|improve this answer

You have some unseen copies being made:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <map>

using namespace std;
struct TestStruct;

int main (int argc, char * const argv[]) {

    map<string, TestStruct> testStructMap;

    std::cout << "Marker One\n";

    //why does this line cause "~TestStruct()" to be invoked twice?
    TestStruct *thisTestStruct = &testStructMap["test"];

    std::cout << "Marker Two\n";

    return 0;
}

struct TestStruct{
    TestStruct(){
        std::cout << "TestStruct Constructor!\n";
    }

    TestStruct( TestStruct const& other) {
        std::cout << "TestStruct copy Constructor!\n";
    }

    TestStruct& operator=( TestStruct const& rhs) {
        std::cout << "TestStruct copy assignment!\n";
    }

    ~TestStruct(){
        std::cout << "TestStruct Destructor!\n";
    }
};

Results in:

Marker One
TestStruct Constructor!
TestStruct copy Constructor!
TestStruct copy Constructor!
TestStruct Destructor!
TestStruct Destructor!
Marker Two
TestStruct Destructor!
share|improve this answer

add the following to TestStruct's interface:

TestStruct(const TestStruct& other) {
    std::cout << "TestStruct Copy Constructor!\n";
}   
share|improve this answer

Your two mysterious destructor calls are probably paired with copy constructor calls going on somewhere within the std::map. For example, it's conceivable that operator[] default-constructs a temporary TestStruct object, and then copy-constructs it into the proper location in the map. The reason that there are two destructor calls (and thus probably two copy constructor calls) is implementation-specific, and will depend on your compiler and standard library implementation.

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operator[] inserts to the map if there is not already an element there.

What you are missing is output for the compiler-supplied copy constructor in your TestStruct, which is used during container housekeeping. Add that output, and it should all make more sense.

EDIT: Andrey's answer prompted me to take a look at the source in Microsoft VC++ 10's <map>, which is something you could also do to follow this through in all its gory detail. You can see the insert() call to which he refers.

mapped_type& operator[](const key_type& _Keyval)
    {   // find element matching _Keyval or insert with default mapped
    iterator _Where = this->lower_bound(_Keyval);
    if (_Where == this->end()
        || this->comp(_Keyval, this->_Key(_Where._Mynode())))
        _Where = this->insert(_Where,
            value_type(_Keyval, mapped_type()));
    return ((*_Where).second);
    }
share|improve this answer

so the lesson is - dont put structs in a map if you care about their lifecycles. Use pointers, or even better shared_ptrs to them

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