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I use wchar_t for internal strings and UTF-8 for storage in files. I need to use STL to input/output text to screen and also do it by using full Lithuanian charset.
It's all fine because I'm not forced to do the same for files, so the following example does the job just fine:

#include <io.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <iostream>
    _setmode (_fileno(stdout), _O_U16TEXT);
    wcout << L"AaĄąfl" << endl;
But I became curious and attempted to do the same with files with no success. Of course I could use formatted input/output, but that is... discouraged.
    FILE* fp;
    _wfopen_s (&fp, L"utf-8_out_test.txt", L"w");
    _setmode (_fileno (fp), _O_U8TEXT);
    _fwprintf_p (fp, L"AaĄą\nfl");
    fclose (fp);
    _wfopen_s (&fp, L"utf-8_in_test.txt", L"r");
    _setmode (_fileno (fp), _O_U8TEXT);
    wchar_t text[256];
    fseek (fp, NULL, SEEK_SET);
    fwscanf (fp, L"%s", text);
    wcout << text << endl;
    fwscanf (fp, L"%s", text);
    wcout << text << endl;
    fclose (fp);
This snippet works perfectly (although I am not sure how it handles malformed chars). So, is there any way to:

  • get FILE* or integer file handle form a std::basic_*fstream?
  • simulate _setmode () on it?
  • extend std::basic_*fstream so it handles UTF-8 I/O?

Yes, I am studying at an university and this is somewhat related to my assignments, but I am trying to figure this out for myself. It won't influence my grade or anything like that.

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Googling "stl utf8" yields codeproject.com/KB/stl/utf8facet.aspx about midway on the first page. –  zneak Oct 25 '10 at 20:10
    
@zneak Oh, my. I didn't expect a LMGTFY (let alone with my own keywords). Anyway, this is exactly what I was looking for, although I was hoping for something that would be possible to memorize. Silly me. –  transistor09 Oct 26 '10 at 15:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use std::codecvt_facet template to perform the conversion.

You may use standard std::codecvt_byname, or a non-standard codecvt_facet implementation.

#include <locale>
using namespace std;
typedef codecvt_facet<wchar_t, char, mbstate_t> Cvt;
locale utf8locale(locale(), new codecvt_byname<wchar_t, char, mbstate_t> ("en_US.UTF-8"));
wcout.pubimbue(utf8locale);
wcout << L"Hello, wide to multybyte world!" << endl;

Beware that on some platforms codecvt_byname can only emit conversion only for locales that are installed in the system.

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Excuse me, but that code even not compiling? –  Dennis Yurichev Jan 6 '13 at 10:38
    
@DennisYurichev does your platform support codecvt_byname? –  Basilevs Jan 6 '13 at 11:49

The easiest way would be to do the conversion to UTF-8 yourself before trying to output. You might get some inspiration from this question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/148403/utf8-to-from-wide-char-conversion-in-stl

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I know how to convert (I wrote a decoder), but I was wondering if there was a less troublesome way. –  transistor09 Oct 25 '10 at 20:25
    
IMHO codecvt facet (once implemented) is a convenient way to perform conversions in STL. Why troublesome? –  Basilevs Oct 26 '10 at 17:02
    
Less troublesome would be if you could memorize it. Despite that, I agree that facet is convenient in most cases (until standards offer something internal). –  transistor09 Oct 26 '10 at 18:33

Well, after some testing I figured out that FILE is accepted for _iobuf (in the w*fstream constructor). So, the following code does what I need.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <io.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
//For writing
    FILE* fp;
    _wfopen_s (&fp, L"utf-8_out_test.txt", L"w");
    _setmode (_fileno (fp), _O_U8TEXT);
    wofstream fs (fp);
    fs << L"ąfl";
    fclose (fp);
//And reading
    FILE* fp;
    _wfopen_s (&fp, L"utf-8_in_test.txt", L"r");
    _setmode (_fileno (fp), _O_U8TEXT);
    wifstream fs (fp);
    wchar_t array[6];
    fs.getline (array, 5);
    wcout << array << endl;//For debug
    fclose (fp);
This sample reads and writes legit UTF-8 files (without BOM) in Windows compiled with Visual Studio 2k8.

Can someone give any comments about portability? Improvements?

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Thank you verymuch :) This solved my mind buggling question:) –  Hossein Jul 21 '13 at 10:42

get FILE* or integer file handle form a std::basic_*fstream?

Answered elsewhere.

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I tried this one out but it just didn't work. –  transistor09 Oct 26 '10 at 18:50
    
Um, scratch that, FILE* fp; wofstream fs (fp); seems to work just fine! –  transistor09 Oct 26 '10 at 18:59

You can't make STL to directly work with UTF-8. The basic reason is that STL indirectly forbids multi-char characters. Each character has to be one char/wchar_t.

Microsoft actually breaks the standard with their UTF-16 encoding, so maybe you can get some inspiration there.

share|improve this answer
    
In first snippet if I omit _setmode wcout doesn't work. I thought it would be same with files too. And after executing second snippet I tested it, the output file was a legit UTF-8. –  transistor09 Oct 25 '10 at 20:21
    
@transistor09 Yes, you can read and output UTF-8, but you can't store UTF-8 in any other way then raw data or encoded in UTF-32 (UTF-16 in Windows). –  Let_Me_Be Oct 25 '10 at 20:40
    
@Let_Me_Be That's what I want: keep wchar_t in RAM and store UTF-8 in HDD. –  transistor09 Oct 25 '10 at 21:07
    
-1, simply untrue. char can have a multibyte encoding, and std::string doesn't change that. The Standard Library explicitly confirms it, in fact: There's no reason to have std::codecvt::max_length if it would be always be 1 –  MSalters Oct 26 '10 at 8:52
    
@MSalters That specifies the number of external characters matching one internal! Not the other way around. –  Let_Me_Be Oct 26 '10 at 10:03

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