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THE SITUATION:

  1. I have code in lib/foo/bar.rb with a simple method defined as such:

    module Foo
      class Bar
        def test
          "FooBar"
        end
      end
    end
    
  2. In my helper, FooBarHelper, I have:

    require `lib/foo/bar`
    module FooBarHelper
      def test_foo_bar
        fb = Foo::Bar.new
        fb.test
      end
    end
    
  3. In my view, I call this helper method like so:

    <%= test_foo_bar =>
    
  4. In my config/environments/development.rb, I added the directory to my config.autoload_paths:

    config.autoload_paths += ["#{config.root}/lib/foo"]
    

THE PROBLEM:

When I change the return value of Foo::Bar.test to, for example, "MODIFIED FOOBAR", the original return value, "FooBar", is still being displayed on the view and not the new value.

Since I'm in development mode, shouldn't the code reload the code on every request?

Could someone tell me what I'm missing?

Thanks!

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

They removed the lib folder the app root in Rails 3.

You can either add it back
config.autoload_paths << 'lib'
or you can use `require_dependency` in your helper.
module FooBarHelper
  require_dependency 'foo/bar'

  def test_foo_bar
    fb = Foo::Bar.new
    fb.test
  end
end

Both ways tell Rails that your file lib/foo/bar.rb should be autoloaded and subsequently, reloaded each request.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response Samuel! Aren't I already using your first suggestion? Should I be using the << operator instead fo +=? I thought they were equivalent. –  John Oct 26 '10 at 3:03
    
For your purpose, they are the same. The difference is you want lib to be autoloaded for it to be able to find the foo/bar.rb source file for the constant Foo::Bar. –  Samuel Oct 26 '10 at 3:11
    
I updated THE SITUATION section of my post to make it easier to pick apart. See Part 4. –  John Oct 26 '10 at 3:12
1  
Do you still have a require statement? Rails doesn't stop you from requiring files and preventing it from reloading them (think libraries that you didn't write). If you use autoload, you cannot use require and must let rails do it. Otherwise use require_dependency if you don't want to autoload the lib folder. –  Samuel Oct 26 '10 at 4:15
1  
Nice! Will require_dependency auto-reload? I also managed to apply what you stated about the auto-class mapping so that I don't have to autoload the entire lib folder by simply creating another folder foo_lib and putting foo inside of it. Question: Where did you read about this stuff? Because I would definitely like to read more about it. –  John Oct 26 '10 at 4:23

Previous answers does not work. Here is a working one: http://ileitch.github.com/2012/03/24/rails-32-code-reloading-from-lib.html

You have to use both:

config.watchable_dirs['lib'] = [:rb]

and

require_dependency

but any config.autoload_paths based solution won't work in Rails ~> 3.2

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2  
I definitely think this should be the accepted solution. I spent the last half hour search for this because autoloading the entire lib dir just felt dirty. –  Patrick Nov 13 '12 at 20:12
    
Thanks for your answer, Mike. The problem is that the first answer was given at the time when Rails 3.1 was available. However, I acknowledge your answer is also correct. I've given you an up-vote, but perhaps you could create a new question for Rails > 3.2 and answer it yourself. –  John Dec 21 '12 at 8:57
1  
I put config.watchable_dirs['lib'] = [:rb] in development.rb and in my controller I used require_dependency "my_folder\my_class" to reference my class in lib\my_folder\my_class. See apidock.com/rails/v3.2.8/ActiveSupport/Dependencies/Loadable/… for more. –  Sebastian Patten Dec 30 '12 at 4:52
    
I upvoted this because it unearthed a rarely mentioned config option (watchable_dirs). However, it doesn't work for me in Rails 4.0.0. If I omit config.autoload_paths, it can't even find the libraries, and you don't explain how you tell Rails where to look instead of via autoload_paths. Do you mess with $: or something? Furthermore, I get superclass mismatch for class errors with require_dependency. –  Adam Spiers Aug 10 '13 at 11:58
    
OK, I pinned this down to weirdness resulting from subclassing Struct.new(...). Once I eliminated that, autoloading and reloading all worked great simply by setting config.autoload_paths. –  Adam Spiers Aug 10 '13 at 13:04

Autoloading code from the lib folder was intentionally disabled in rails3, see this ticket for more details.

The workaround suggested by Samuel is a great start, however I found that certain environments still had difficulty finding the libraries in a testing environment (say being invoked from a cucumber scenario), and that including the root path, as suggested within the ticket and hinted by the original comment in application.rb was a more robust approach:

config.autoload_paths += %W(#{config.root}/lib)
share|improve this answer

Why are you putting the require into the module, when using autoload_path you should not need to require the file at all, it should be working without, I think if you manually require the file afterwards, rails does not know when to load it again?

Something like this:

require `bar`

module FooBarHelper

  def test_foo_bar
    fb = Foo::Bar.new
    fb.test
  end

end

should work, no need for having the require inside your module.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response Max! Appreciate it! So how do you propose I access my Bar class? –  John Oct 26 '10 at 1:53
    
I have updated my above answer, does that work for you with reloading? –  Max Schulze Oct 26 '10 at 2:02
    
No dice on my end... did this work for you? –  John Oct 26 '10 at 2:21
    
Sorry my mistake, if you have /lib/foo in your load path you only need to require bar in the file. I corrected my example. –  Max Schulze Oct 26 '10 at 2:33
    
Still seeing the same result... –  John Oct 26 '10 at 2:42

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