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I want to run an infinite loop for a while. Basically, i want to have something like this

//do something

while(1){
  //do some work
}

//do some other thing

but i want the running time of the loop to be fixed, example, the loop could be running for 5 seconds. Do somebody have an idea?

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2  
Need more information, is there a reason you can't just sleep ? –  user318904 Oct 25 '10 at 21:46
    
Could be needed for a real time application. I'm just speculating though. –  Graphics Noob Oct 25 '10 at 21:53
11  
The title is an oxymoron :) –  500 - Internal Server Error Oct 25 '10 at 22:06
2  
And seriosly, there is a huge difference between simple waiting and busy waiting. Pick one. –  ruslik Oct 25 '10 at 23:15
1  
"for a while": nice pun! –  Arun Oct 26 '10 at 5:20

6 Answers 6

Just do sleep(5) (include unistd.h). You can use it like this:

// do some work here
someFunction();    

// have a rest
sleep(5);

// do some more work
anotherFunction();

If you're doing work inside the loop, you can do (include time.h):

// set the end time to the current time plus 5 seconds
time_t endTime = time(NULL) + 5;

while (time(NULL) < endTime)
{
    // do work here.
}
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Keep in mind that the while loop will take at least 5 seconds, it may take longer than 5 seconds if the work inside the loop takes a long time. –  dreamlax Oct 25 '10 at 21:50
    
this is interesting, but i don't want to make a system call inside thee loop –  the_drug Oct 26 '10 at 6:18
    
@the_drug: Is there a reason why? –  dreamlax Oct 28 '10 at 5:58
    
yes, beacause i am trying to measure the memory bandwidht. A system call will increase the execution time of the loop... –  the_drug Oct 28 '10 at 8:48

Try using clock().

#include <time.h>

clock_t start = clock();

while (1)
{
    clock_t now = clock();
    if ((now - start)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC > 5)
        break;

    // Do something
}
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1  
clock() returns the amount of processor time used, not real time. –  dreamlax Oct 26 '10 at 0:09

First of all, consider using the sleep function if possible. If you have to do actual work for a specified time period, which I find unlikely, the following ugly solution would work:

#include <signal.h>
int alarmed = 0;
void sigh(int signum) {
    alarmed = 1;
}
int main(void){
    /* ... */
    signal(SIGALRM, &sigh);
    alarm(5); // Alarm in 5 seconds
    while(!alarmed) {
        /* Do work */
    }
    /* ... */
}

A solution using time.h would also be possible, and perhaps simpler and/or more accurate, depending on context:

#include <time.h>
int main(void){
    /* ... */
    clock_t start = clock();
    while(clock() - start < 5 * CLOCKS_PER_SEC) {
        /* Do work */
    }
    /* ... */
}
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That should be void sigh(int signum), right? –  Oliver Charlesworth Oct 25 '10 at 22:35
    
the first solution is the one i am actually using. The fact is that i have to use "volatile" variables in my loop, otherwise they are lost. But using volatile variables slowdowns my loop. –  the_drug Oct 26 '10 at 6:21
    
@Oli: It should. I'll edit now — wasn't really paying attention last night ;) –  You Oct 26 '10 at 7:01

Pseudo-code:

starttime = ...;

while(currentTime - startTime < 5){

}
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If you don't want to call a time getting function each time through the loop and are on a system that has alarm (POSIXes like Unix, Linux, BSD...) you can do:

static volatile int timeout = 0;

void handle_alrm(int sig) {
     timeout = 1;
}

int main(void) {
    signal(SIGALRM, handle_alrm);
    ...
    timeout = 0;
    alarm(5);
    while (!timeout) {
       do_work();
    }
    alarm(0); // If the signal didn't fire yet we can turn it off now.
    ...

Signals can have other side effects (like kicking you out of system calls). You should look into these before relying on them.

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Does timeout actually need to be volatile? And if so, should it just be a sig_atomic_t? I ask because every time I do anything with signals, I always have to look it all up over again... –  Steve Jessop Oct 25 '10 at 22:06
    
In this context I would use both; I can make an argument that either/both of them are unnecessary, but they won't do any harm and they might save your ass. –  zwol Oct 25 '10 at 22:09
    
@Steve: I was going to make it sig_atomic_t but I thought "that might not be available on Windows" and then forgot to go back and change it when I realized that alarm might not be available there either. –  nategoose Oct 25 '10 at 23:03
    
@Steve: As far as making it volatile, I think it does need to be this way, but even if it is not if you restrict your access to it to just the types in my example it should not cause any inefficiency or extra instructions in the program. –  nategoose Oct 25 '10 at 23:06
    
@Zack: If either getting the new time or using alarms are implemented correctly the other should not be necessary, but it could save you in the case that you did timing math wrong. It may also be the case that SIGALRM isn't available (either in use somewhere else in the program or just not on the target platform). –  nategoose Oct 25 '10 at 23:09

Not tested; resolution is very coarse.

#include <time.h>
#define RUNTIME 5.0 /* seconds */

double runtime = 0;
double start = clock(); /* automatically convert clock_t to double */
while (runtime < RUNTIME / CLOCKS_PER_SEC) {
    /* work */
    runtime = clock() - start;
}

If /* work */ takes more than 5 seconds, the loop will take more than 5 seconds.

If /* work */ takes 1.2 seconds, the loop will execute approximately 5 times for a total of 6 seconds

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Just curious, why use a double and not clock_t? –  dreamlax Oct 25 '10 at 23:19
    
Because clock_t is an "arithmetic type". There is no guarantee it can hold fractional values (for instance: 0.5) ... and I feel better using doubles –  pmg Oct 25 '10 at 23:27
    
Also, after perusing the relevant spec it appears that clock() will return the amount of processor time used, not real time. –  dreamlax Oct 26 '10 at 0:08

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