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 <!DOCTYPE html>
 <html> 
 <head>
 </head>
 <body>
      <div style="background-color:#f09;">
           <textarea></textarea>
      </div>
 </body>
 </html>

Result in Chrome:

Result in FF:

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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Try display:block on the textarea:

 <!DOCTYPE html>
 <html> 
 <head>
      <style type="text/css">
           textarea {display:block;}
      </style>
 </head>
 <body>
      <div style="background-color:#f09;">
           <textarea></textarea>
      </div>
 </body>
 </html>

The issue is that the textarea is inline and it is using the text height to add a bit of extra padding. You can also specify:

 <!DOCTYPE html>
 <html> 
 <head>
 </head>
 <body>
      <div style="background-color:#f09;line-height:0px;font-size:1px;">
           <textarea></textarea>
      </div>
 </body>
 </html>

Finally, if you're really worried about consistency between browsers keep in mind margins and other things like that can be defined with different defaults in different browsers. Utilizing something like YUI-Reset can help bring all new browsers to a consistent standard from which you can build.

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4  
If you want to keep the <textarea>'s display style inline, you can also use textarea { vertical-align: bottom; } (or top, or middle; probably pretty much any value other than baseline, which is the default for inline elements). –  eyelidlessness Oct 26 '10 at 0:15
    
Thank god! Very nice. :) –  Spot Mar 10 '11 at 5:50
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Setting the display mode to block did the trick for me. Just to clarify, here is the declaration that you need to add to your stylesheet. I would recommend adding it to your reset or normalize stylesheet, in the first place.

textarea {
    display:block
}
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I usually have a "first line" in every global.css file I make. saying:

<style>    
html,body,p,h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6,img,table,td,th 
{
   margin:0;padding:0;border:none;
   font-familiy:"my sites default font";font-size:10px;
}
</style>

After this, I feel that I have full control of the browsers behaviour, when testing on 5 different platforms: Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Opera and ... doh... Microsoft Internet Extracrap..

Then you can easily do something similar for < input > and < textarea > too. if the first line does too much, then just make a second line for the "special cases" alone.

<style>
textarea {margin:0; padding:0; border:none; display:block;}
</style>

Remember that CSS inherits, so you can have multiple declarations of different classes.

Does this remove your problem?

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I accept the -1 but please do comment who ever you are, so I know what you dont agree upon. It works for me, so I would like to know what I have missed. –  BerggreenDK Dec 9 '10 at 22:09
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