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I want to do this in Javascript:

function Z( f )
{
  f();
}

function A()
{
  this.b = function()
  {
    Z( function () { this.c() } );
  }

  this.c = function()
  {
    alert('hello world!');
  }
}

var foo = new A();
foo.b();

It can be accomplished this way:

function Z( f )
{
  f();
}

function A()
{
  var self = this;
  this.b = function()
  {
    Z( function () { self.c() } );
  }

  this.c = function()
  {
    alert('hello world!');
  }
}

var foo = new A();
foo.b();

Is there a better way?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Keeping a reference to the parent (like you have) is a good approach, however for your specific example there's no need for the anonymous wrapper, you can pass the function directly, like this:

var self = this;
this.b = function()
{
  Z(self.c);
}

You can test it out here, and without this wrapper there's actually no need for the self variable, you can just use this directly, like this:

this.b = function()
{
  Z(this.c);
}

You can test that version here.


Since there seems to be some confusion in the comments below, the above code maintains this for the question, if you want to maintain the this/context inside the callback as well, use .call() like this:

this.b = function()
{
  Z.call(this, this.c);
}

And for Z:

function Z( f )
{
  f.call(this);
}

You can test it here.

share|improve this answer
    
Right, in this simple example, there is no reason for the wrapper. It shouldn't be hard to conceive of an example where it is necessary. (Changing parameters, etc.) If you don't wrap, though, I assume the closure is passed as one might expect? –  Jonathan Swinney Oct 26 '10 at 1:04
2  
without the anonymous wrapper, c is called with the wrong this reference. –  Lee Oct 26 '10 at 1:05
    
@Jonathan - Yes, correct, in that case you'd want to pass a variable in just like you have self that gets you access to what's in the closure. –  Nick Craver Oct 26 '10 at 1:06
    
@Lee - it's not, the demo shows this, with the wrapper this is an incorrect reference. –  Nick Craver Oct 26 '10 at 1:07
1  
@Nick - function c is a member of class A. It should be able to use this internally to access other members of A. When called through Z without the wrapper, this will not be the case. You can see this demonstrated here. –  Lee Oct 26 '10 at 1:51

You can alternatively use

this.b = function()
{
    Z( (function () { this.c() }).apply(this) );
}
share|improve this answer

There is a pattern that's often called "Delegate", which addresses this issue.

In javascript, a not-too-fancy implementation might look something like this:

/** class Delegate **/
var Delegate = function(thisRef, funcRef, argsArray) {
    this.thisRef=thisRef;
    this.funcRef=funcRef;
    this.argsArray=argsArray;
}
Delegate.prototype.invoke = function() {
    this.funcRef.apply(this.thisRef, this.argsArray);
}
/** static function Delegate.create - convenience function **/
Delegate.create = function(thisRef, funcRef, argsArray) {
    var d = new Delegate(thisRef, funcRef, argsArray);
    return function() {  d.invoke(); }
}

In your example, you would use it like this:

this.b = function() {
  Z( Delegate.create(this, this.c) );
}

you could also write functions that expect to receive a Delegate:

function Z( d ) {
    d.invoke();
}

then, in A, your impl of b becomes:

this.b = function() {
    var d = new Delegate(this, this.c);

    Z( d );
    SomeOtherFunc( d );
}

The Delegate just provides a simple, consistent way of encapsulating the this reference (which you've called self), within an object instance that can be dealt with like any other object instance. It's more readable, and it keeps you from having to pollute your function scope with superfluous variables like self. A fancier delegate implementation could have its own methods and other related state. It's also possible to build the delegate in such a way that it helps to minimize some scope-related memory management problems (though the code I've shown here is definitely not an example of that).

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this works: Z( function() { Delegate.create( this, c ) } );. Without the wrapper, there is no need for self and no reason for the Delegate because it's shorter to write Z( this.c );. –  Jonathan Swinney Oct 26 '10 at 1:54
    
@Jonathan - you've added an extra wrapper that's not in my example. it's just Z( Delegate.create(this,c) ); I expanded the Delegate example a little so it's more flexible, and clearer what's going on. –  Lee Oct 26 '10 at 2:03
    
@Jonathan - Z( this.c ) will work, as long as you don't care what object this references when running inside c. The code you've shown doesn't use this from within c, so it won't present any problems. If you check out (this slight modification of @Nick's example)[jsfiddle.net/UQpnX/], you'll see the potential problem, which is solved by the anonymous wrapper, in your original example -- or with a more formal construct like the Delegate. Either one is fine. –  Lee Oct 26 '10 at 2:23
    
If you have to call .invoke() in your callback, why not use .call() or .apply() in both locations? It's a much simpler approach. –  Nick Craver Oct 26 '10 at 2:24
    
@Nick - you don't have to call invoke() in your callback. That is one of the two examples I showed. The first example is by far the more common usage of this approach: the static Delegate.create returns a simple function. You can pass it off to anywhere that you could pass any other function. The second example simply shows an alternate usage, which is really only useful if you extend Delegate to include additional domain specific features -- and there are cases in which this can be a very desirable feature. –  Lee Oct 26 '10 at 2:29

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