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I have a flag enum below.

[Flags]
public enum FlagTest
{
    None = 0x0,
    Flag1 = 0x1,
    Flag2 = 0x2,
    Flag3 = 0x4
}

I cannot make the if statement evaluate to true.

FlagTest testItem = FlagTest.Flag1 | FlagTest.Flag2;

if (testItem == FlagTest.Flag1)
{
    // Do something,
    // however This is never true.
}

How can I make this true?

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Correct me if I'm wrong, is 0 appropriate to be used as flag value? –  Roylee Jan 17 '13 at 16:11
2  
@Roylee: 0 is acceptable, and it's a good idea to have a "None" or "Undefined" flag in order to test having no flags set. It's by no means required, but it's a good practice. The important thing to remember about this is pointed out by Leonid in his answer. –  Andy Mar 10 '13 at 19:08
2  
@Roylee It is actually recommended by Microsoft to provide a None flag with a value of zero. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/… –  ThatMatthew Apr 17 '13 at 19:27
    
A lot of people also argue that bit comparison is too difficult to read so should be avoided in favour of an collection of flags, where you can just do collection.contains flag –  MikeT Oct 21 '13 at 12:45
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11 Answers 11

up vote 117 down vote accepted
if ((testItem & FlagTest.Flag1) == FlagTest.Flag1)
{
     // Do something
}
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What exactly is the logic here? Why does the predicate have to be written like this? –  Ian O'Brien Mar 25 at 15:42
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In .NET 4 there is a new method Enum.HasFlag. This allows you to write:

if ( testItem.HasFlag( FlagTest.Flag1 ) )
{
    // Do Stuff
}

which is much more readable, IMO.

The .NET source indicates that this performs the same logic as the accepted answer:

public Boolean HasFlag(Enum flag) {
    if (!this.GetType().IsEquivalentTo(flag.GetType())) {
        throw new ArgumentException(
            Environment.GetResourceString(
                "Argument_EnumTypeDoesNotMatch", 
                flag.GetType(), 
                this.GetType()));
    }

    ulong uFlag = ToUInt64(flag.GetValue()); 
    ulong uThis = ToUInt64(GetValue());
    // test predicate
    return ((uThis & uFlag) == uFlag); 
}
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17  
Ah, finally something out of the box. This is great, I've been waiting for this relatively simple feature for a long time. Glad they decided to slip it in. –  Rob van Groenewoud Apr 13 '10 at 22:25
6  
Note, however, the answer below showing performance issues with this method -- this might be an issue for some people. Happily not for me. –  Andy Mortimer Nov 18 '11 at 10:58
1  
The performance consideration for this method is boxing because it takes arguments as an instance of the Enum class. –  Adam Houldsworth Dec 7 '12 at 16:18
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:) For those who have trouble visualizing what is happening with the accepted solution (which is this)

if ((testItem & FlagTest.Flag1) == FlagTest.Flag1)
{
    // do stuff
}

We have (as per the question) test item defined as so

testItem 
 = flag1 | flag2  
 = 001 | 010  
 = 011

Then in the if statement the left hand side of the equals is as so:

(testItem & flag1) 
 = (011 & 001) 
 = 001

And the full if statement (that evaluates to true if flag1 is set in testItem) as so

(testItem & flag1) == flag1
 = (001) == 001
 = true

Hope that makes sense to people :)

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I set up an extension method to do it: related question.

Basically:

public static bool IsSet( this Enum input, Enum matchTo )
{
    return ( Convert.ToUInt32( input ) & Convert.ToUInt32( matchTo ) ) != 0;
}

Then you can do:

FlagTests testItem = FlagTests.Flag1 | FlagTests.Flag2;

if( testItem.IsSet ( FlagTests.Flag1 ) )
    //Flag1 is set


Incidentally the convention I use for enums is singular for standard, plural for flags. That way you know from the enum name whether it can hold multiple values.

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This should be a comment but as I'm a new user it looks like I just can't add comments yet... public static bool IsSet( this Enum input, Enum matchTo ) { return ( Convert.ToUInt32( input ) & Convert.ToUInt32( matchTo ) ) != 0; } Is there a way to be compatible with any kind of enum (because here it won't work if your enum is of type UInt64 or can have negative values)? –  user276648 Feb 19 '10 at 3:53
    
This is quite redundant with Enum.HasFlag(Enum) (available in .net 4.0) –  PPC Apr 11 '12 at 17:58
1  
@PPC I wouldn't say redundant exactly - plenty of people are developing on older versions of the framework. You are right though, .Net 4 users should use the HasFlag extension instead. –  Keith Apr 12 '12 at 9:55
2  
@Keith: Also, there is a notable difference: ((FlagTest)0x1).HasFlag(0x0) will return true, which may or may not be a wanted behaviour –  PPC Apr 12 '12 at 18:05
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@phil-devaney

Note that except in the simplest of cases, the Enum.HasFlag carries a heavy performance penalty in comparison to writing out the code manually. Consider the following code:

[Flags]
public enum TestFlags
{
    One = 1,
    Two = 2,
    Three = 4,
    Four = 8,
    Five = 16,
    Six = 32,
    Seven = 64,
    Eight = 128,
    Nine = 256,
    Ten = 512
}


class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        TestFlags f = TestFlags.Five; /* or any other enum */
        bool result = false;

        Stopwatch s = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
        {
            result |= f.HasFlag(TestFlags.Three);
        }
        s.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(s.ElapsedMilliseconds); // *4793 ms*

        s.Restart();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
        {
            result |= (f & TestFlags.Three) != 0;
        }
        s.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(s.ElapsedMilliseconds); // *27 ms*        

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

Over 10 million iterations, the HasFlags extension method takes a whopping 4793 ms, compared to the 27 ms for the standard bitwise implementation.

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3  
Indeed. If you look at the implementation of HasFlag, you'll see that it does a "GetType()" on both operands, which is quite slow. Then it does "Enum.ToUInt64(value.GetValue());" on both operands before doing the bitwise check. –  user276648 Sep 26 '11 at 6:36
    
This is a huge performance difference for a very small functionality gain. Worth stopping using HasFlag() –  PPC Apr 12 '12 at 18:07
    
I ran your test several times and got ~500ms for HasFlags and ~32ms for bitwise. While still an order of magnitude faster with bitwise, HasFlags was an order of magnitude down from your test. (Ran the test on a 2.5GHz Core i3 and .NET 4.5) –  MarioVW Jun 26 '13 at 17:13
    
@MarioVW Running several times on .NET 4, i7-3770 gives ~2400ms vs ~20ms on AnyCPU (64-bit) mode, and ~3000ms vs ~20ms on 32-bit mode. .NET 4.5 may have optimised it slightly. Also note the performance difference between 64-bit and 32-bit builds, which might be due to faster 64-bit arithmetic (see the first comment). –  Bob Jul 2 '13 at 7:06
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One more piece of advice... Never do the standard binary check with the flag whose value is "0". Your check on this flag will always be true.

[Flags]
public enum LevelOfDetail
{
    [EnumMember(Value = "FullInfo")]
    FullInfo=0,
    [EnumMember(Value = "BusinessData")]
    BusinessData=1
}

If you binary check input parameter against FullInfo - you get:

detailLevel = LevelOfDetail.BusinessData;
bool bPRez = (detailLevel & LevelOfDetail.FullInfo) == LevelOfDetail.FullInfo;

bPRez will always be true as ANYTHING & 0 always == 0.


Instead you should simply check that the value of the input is 0:

bool bPRez = (detailLevel == LevelOfDetail.FullInfo);
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This is an important point to remember when setting up your Flags enum. Thanks for reminding us. –  Andy Mar 10 '13 at 19:01
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if((testItem & FlagTest.Flag1) == FlagTest.Flag1) 
{
...
}
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For bit operations, you need to use bitwise operators.

This should do the trick:

if ((testItem & FlagTest.Flag1) == FlagTest.Flag1)
{
    // Do something,
    // however This is never true.
}

Edit: Fixed my if check - I slipped back into my C/C++ ways (thanks to Ryan Farley for pointing it out)

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Try this:


if ((testItem & FlagTest.Flag1) == FlagTest.Flag1)
{
    // do something
}
Basically, your code is asking if having both flags set is the same as having one flag set, which is obviously false. The code above will leave only the Flag1 bit set if it is set at all, then compares this result to Flag1.

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Not sure why:

if(testItem & FlagTest.Flag1)

is getting upmodded. It won't compile as it is missing the check for eqality. FlagTest & FlagTest does not evaluate to true/false and will therefore get a compiler error.

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Regarding the edit. You can't make it true. I suggest you wrap what you want into another class (or extension method) to get closer to the syntax you need.

i.e.

public class FlagTestCompare
{
    public static bool Compare(this FlagTest myFlag, FlagTest condition)
    {
         return ((myFlag & condition) == condition);
    }
}
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