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When running a query like "insert into table " how do we handle the commit size? I.e. are all records from anotherTable inserted in a single transaction OR is there a way to set a commit size?

Thanks very much ~Sri PS: I am a first timer here, and this site looks very good!

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For newbies, Please try to avoid adding unnecessary elements to the question. Make use of the comment section (frugally) for the same. :) Bit by Bit makes a byte. –  SuvP May 30 '14 at 19:25

12 Answers 12

In the context that the original poster wants to avoid rollback space problems, the answer is pretty straightforward. The rollback segments should be sized to accpomodate the size of transactions, not the other way round. You commit when your transaction is complete.

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+1 for being the most sensible answer here –  Rob van Wijk Jun 6 '09 at 10:09

In good databases that is an atomic statement, so no, there is no way to limit the number of records inserted - which is a good thing!

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The reason why I want to do that is to avoid the rollback segment going out of space. Also, I want to see results being populated in the target table at regular intervals.

I dont want to use a where loop because it might add performance overheads. Isn't it?

~Sri

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You should tag your question with "oracle" since IIRC the rollback segment is an Oracle feature. –  Bill Karwin Dec 31 '08 at 2:51
    
I believe the expected approach on this site is that you should edit your original question with any further information, as it could potentially get lost as other answers are voted up. –  RSlaughter Dec 31 '08 at 3:02
    
Can you add this as a modification to the original question? –  David Aldridge Jan 2 '09 at 15:08

I've written code in various langues, mostly Java, to do bulk inserts like what you described. Each time I did it, mostly from parsing some input file or something like that, I would basically just prepare a sub-set of data to insert from the total amount (usually batches of 4000 or so) and feed that data to our DAO layer. So it was done programatically. We never noticed any real performance hit for doing it this way and we were dealing with a few million records. If you have large data sets to insert the operation will "take awhile" regardless of how you do it.

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David Aldridge is right, size the rollback segment based on the maximum transaction, when you want the INSERT to either succeed or fail as a whole.

Some alternatives:

If you don't care about being able to roll it back (which is what the segment is there for), you could ALTER TABLE and add the NOLOGGING clause. But that's not a wise move unless you're loading a reporting table where you drop all old rows and load new ones, or some other special cases.

If you're okay with some rows getting inserted and others failing for some reason, then add support for handling the failures, using the INSERT INTO LOG ERRORS INTO syntax.

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You can't handle the commit size unless you explicitly code it. For example you could use a where loop, and code up a way to limit the ammount of data your selecting.

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but with large inserts this is usually sub-optimal. –  Bob Probst Dec 31 '08 at 2:50
    
Not sure why this answer is getting down-voted as it's correct. –  Nick Pierpoint Jan 8 '09 at 12:46
    
Me neither nick never understand it. –  JoshBerke Jan 8 '09 at 20:19

If you need the data set to be limited, build that limit into the query.

For example, in Microsoft SQL Server parlance, you can use "TOP N" to make sure the query only returns a limited number of rows.

INSERT INTO thisTable
  SELECT TOP 100 * FROM anotherTable;
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But then he needs to insert 101-200 and then 201-300... –  Mark Brady Jan 2 '09 at 23:00

You are right, you may want to run large inserts in batches. The attached link shows a way to do it in SQL Server, if you are using a different backend you would do something simliar but the exact syntax might be differnt. This is a case when a loop is acceptable.

http://www.tek-tips.com/faqs.cfm?fid=3141

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"The reason why I want to do that is to avoid the rollback segment going out of space. Also, I want to see results being populated in the target table at regular intervals."

The first is simply a matter of sizing the undo tablespace correctly. Since the undo is a delete of an existing row, it doesn't require a lot of space. Conversely, a delete generally requires more space because it has to have a copy of the entire deleted row to re-insert it to undo it.

For the second, have a look at v$session_longops and/or rows_processed in v$sql

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INSERT INTO TableInserted
SELECT *
FROM (
   SELECT  *,
          ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY ID) AS RowNumber
   FROM TableSelected
) X
WHERE RowNumber BETWEEN 101 AND 200

You could wrap the above into a while loop pretty easily, replacing the 101 and 200 with variables. It's better than doing 1 record at a time.

I don't know what versions of Oracle support window functions.

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-1 because this is a horribly slow approach. For a 100,000 record table you are accessing "TableSelected" 1000 times, and each access likely is a full table scan ... –  Rob van Wijk Jun 6 '09 at 10:09
    
You're assuming that it's always a table scan. okay, put the data in a temp table. Where's your better way? Don't see it in here. –  Lurker Indeed Jun 8 '09 at 16:46

This is an extended comment to demonstrate that setting indexes to NOLOGGING will not help reduce UNDO or REDO for INSERTs.

The manual implies NOLOGGING indexes may help improve DML by reducing UNDO and REDO. And since NOLOGGING helps with table DML it seems logical that it would also help with INDEX changes. But this test case demonstrates that changing indexes to NOLOGGING has no affect on INSERT statements.

drop table table_no_index;
drop table table_w_log_index;
drop table table_w_nolog_index;

--#0: Before
select name, value from v$mystat natural join v$statname where display_name in ('undo change vector size', 'redo size') order by 1;

--#1: NOLOGGING table with no index.  This is the best case scenario.
create table table_no_index(a number) nologging;
insert /*+ append */ into table_no_index select level from dual connect by level <= 100000;
commit;
select name, value from v$mystat natural join v$statname where display_name in ('undo change vector size', 'redo size') order by 1;

--#2: NOLOGGING table with LOGGING index.  This should generate REDO and UNDO.
create table table_w_log_index(a number) nologging;
create index table_w_log_index_idx on table_w_log_index(a);
insert /*+ append */ into table_w_log_index select level from dual connect by level <= 100000;
commit;
select name, value from v$mystat natural join v$statname where display_name in ('undo change vector size', 'redo size') order by 1;

--#3: NOLOGGING table with NOLOGGING index.  Does this generate as much REDO and UNDO as previous step?
create table table_w_nolog_index(a number) nologging;
create index table_w_nolog_index_idx on table_w_nolog_index(a) nologging;
insert /*+ append */ into table_w_nolog_index select level from dual connect by level <= 100000;
commit;
select name, value from v$mystat natural join v$statname where display_name in ('undo change vector size', 'redo size') order by 1;

Here are the results from the statistics queries. The numbers are cumulative for the session. Test cases #2 and #3 have the same increase in UNDO and REDO.

--#0: BEFORE: Very little redo or undo since session just started.
redo size      35,436
undo change vector size    10,120

--#1: NOLOGGING table, no index: Very little redo or undo.
redo size      88,460
undo change vector size    21,772

--#2: NOLOGGING table, LOGGING index: Large amount of redo and undo.
redo size   6,895,100
undo change vector size 3,180,920

--#3: NOLOGGING table, NOLOGGING index: Large amount of redo and undo.
redo size   13,736,036
undo change vector size 6,354,032
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You may just want to make the indexes NOLOGGING. That way the table data is recoverable, but the indexes will need to be rebuilt if table is recovered. Index maintenance can create a lot of undo.

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Unfortunately index NOLOGGING only applies when creating an index. –  Jon Heller Jun 1 '14 at 7:59
    
@jonearles, from the documentation you linked, "This setting also determines whether subsequent ... direct-path INSERT operations against the index are logged or not logged." You can use the append hint to get direct path inserts. –  RussellH Jul 17 '14 at 0:08
    
Good point, I should have read my link more closely! But I still think it is accurate to say NOLOGGING only applies when creating or rebuilding an index. In this AskTom thread Tom says the same thing several times. Some other online sources, and my simple tests, also agree that NOLOGGING doesn't reduce index redo during direct path inserts. I submitted a comment for the documentation, although I'm not sure if that will ever do any good. –  Jon Heller Jul 17 '14 at 7:05
    
I was talking about reducing undo. From that same AskTom thread: "The undo will be minimized for the index but has to be generated ..."asktom.oracle.com/pls/asktom/… What wasn't clear from that quote is the effect of NOLOGGING on the index. –  RussellH Aug 16 '14 at 22:40
    
Unfortunately it doesn't appear to help with UNDO either. See my answer/comment below. I'm not sure why it doesn't help, it would be a very useful feature if it worked. –  Jon Heller Aug 17 '14 at 15:58

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