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I know that default constructors initialize objects to their default values, but how do we view these values? If there's a variable of type int, it is supposed to be initialized to 0. But how do we actually view these default values of the constructors? Can anyone please provide a code snippet to demonstrate the same?

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2  
What do you mean by view exactly? Do you mean view in the debugger, accessing from within the object? Or are you interested in knowing what exactly the default values of different types are? –  Skurmedel Oct 26 '10 at 11:46
1  
An int doesn't have a default value. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 26 '10 at 11:48
1  
@PigBen: It does, in fact, and it's of course 0. However, an int object may also be uninitialized, in which case it doesn't have a value at all. For instance, after the declaration int i;, i doesn't have the default value 0. However, the expression int() does evaluate to the default value, 0. –  MSalters Oct 26 '10 at 14:12
    
@MSalters -- This is just semantics, but I would not call that the default value. I would call that the default initialized value. But the default state of an int is uninitialized. And the uninitialized state does not have a default value. And I know you might argue that since an uninitialized variable is not required to have a value, that the only thing that can be defined as a default value is it's default initialized value. I would argue that it's default value is the one it has by default, which it doesn't. Again though, this is just semantics. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 26 '10 at 20:44
    
@PigBen: check www2.research.att.com/~bs/glossary.html. It's semantics, sure, but there is consensus on the semantics. –  MSalters Oct 27 '10 at 8:01

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Good coding practice: write your own constructor, so you know how it will be initialized. This is portable and guaranteed to always have the same behaviour. Your code will be easier to read and the compiler knows how to make that efficient, especially when using the special notation:

class Foo
{
  public:
    Foo() : i(0), j(0) {}

  private:
    int i;
    int j;
};
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Unless specified otherwise, objects are constructed with their default constructor, only if one is available.

And for example ints are not initialized.

This is a common source of huge troubles and bugs, because it can have any value.

So the rule is , always initialise your variables, and for a class you do it in the initialization list

class A
{
private:
    int i;
    float f;
    char * pC;
    MyObjectType myObject;
public:
    A() :   // the initialisation list is after the :
    i(0),
    f(2.5),
    pC(NULL),
    myObject("parameter_for_special_constructor")  
    {}
}

}

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In C++, int is not a class and does not have a default (or any other) constructor.

An int is not guaranteed to be initialised to 0.

If you have a class that has an int as an attribute, you should explicitly initialise it in each of the class's constructors (not just the default one).

class sample
{
private:
    int x;
public:
    sample()
        :x(0)
    {
    }

    sample(const int n)
        :x(n)
    {
    }

    sample(const sample& other)
        :x(other.x)
    {
    }

    // [...]
};

This way you (and users of your class) can "view" the default values.

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AFAIK, if T is a type (not necessarily a class), T() returns a default value for the type T. Here's a small test I ran:

int main()
{
    char c = char();
    int i  = int();

    cout << "c = " << hex << (int) c << endl;
    cout << "i = " << i << endl;
}

The output is:

c = 0
i = 0
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1  
Yeah, it's known as a pseudo-constructor. There's also a pseudo-destructor,but it can only be used on a named type (e.g. a typedef'd name), not directly on a built-in type. E.g. you can write int() but not (42).~int(). However, if you have a typedef int Int; then you can write (42).~Int(). Which helps in templated code where the code should work regardless of type. Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 26 '10 at 12:46
1  
A common trap though for a beginner is to type char c(); to try to initialise their character, and then they get compiler errors later because the above declares a function and does not define a variable. –  CashCow Oct 26 '10 at 13:59

Default constructors do not automatically initialise ints to 0. You can use parentheses to indicate the default value though.

struct X
{
   int x;
};

struct X x1; // x1.x is not necessarily 0

struct Y
{
   int y;
   Y() : y()
   {
   }
};

struct Y y1; // y1.y will be 0
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+1 for being technically correct and voted down by some moron who didn't even leave an explanation. Just a nit: using the word struct in the variable declarations is unnecessary in C++. Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 26 '10 at 12:08
    
I know the struct is not necessary at the point of variable declaration but I thought it would make the sample a bit clearer, the first case could be C anyway, the second one could not be as you cannot define constructors in C. –  CashCow Oct 26 '10 at 13:51
    
@CashCow: please be careful with this "could be C/C++" thingy. Especially in this area, C and C++ do differ in very subtle ways. For instance, what exactly can you do with x1 after it's declared ? What about (int*)(&x1) ? –  MSalters Oct 26 '10 at 14:16
    
@MSalters: he he, actually C++ supports that reinterpret_cast, for C compatibility no doubt. It's in the classes section, start of (and flatly contradicting the section on reinterpret_cast). IIRC. Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 26 '10 at 15:13
    
@Alf P. Steinbach: The cast is legal, yes. But that gives you a pointer rvalue. What can you do with that pointer? Is it even guaranteed to point to the uninitialized x.x1? Or does such a guarantee exist only if x.x1 is initialized? It's in those subtle areas where C and C++ standards can unexpectedly differ. –  MSalters Oct 27 '10 at 8:08

show your code

And if your int value is a member of class . you must give it a value in your default constructor func

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The default constructor is which can be invoked with 0 parameters. For example

struct X
{
   X(int x = 3) //default constructor
   {
     //...
   }
};

It initializes the object to whichever state you code it to initialize. However, if you don't define any constructor at all the compiler will attempt to generate a default constructor for you - which, in turn is equivalent to a constructor with no arguments and no body. That means that all the members of class/struct type will be initialized with their def. ctors and all the members of primitive types like int will remain uninitialized. Please note that I specialy noted that the compiler will attempt to generate a dflt ctor, because it can fail to do so, for example when one or more members of the class do not have default constructors. HTH

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...which will result in a compilation error (you may be understood as if the class will be left without a ctor at all) –  davka Oct 26 '10 at 12:31
    
@davka: No, it will result in a compilation error if and only if you use your class in a context where a def.ctor(or any constructor) is required. Otherwise everything will be OK –  Armen Tsirunyan Oct 26 '10 at 12:33
    
which is why I prefer the term empty ctor for a ctor with no parameters, reserving the default ctor to those generated by the compiler. –  davka Oct 26 '10 at 12:37
    
@davka: "default constructor" is a term defined by the Holy Standard. It's defined as any constructor that can be called without arguments. It's an intricate philosophical question whether that permits a class to have two or more default constructors, since then there's no way to call any of them without arguments. Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 26 '10 at 12:50
    
@Alf: yes, I know it's the standard terminology, I just find it somewhat confusing. But indeed, this is philosophy, not related to OP –  davka Oct 26 '10 at 13:22

AS soon as you have created an object start printing the values such as ob.x. Thats the only way u can know what default constructor has assigned to the variables.

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