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In Windows, how can we identify whether a program is 64 bit or 32 bit?

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File? Do you mean a PE (.exe/.dll/etc) file? –  KennyTM Oct 26 '10 at 11:46
    
As KennyTM said, code has bitness, files do not. –  leppie Oct 26 '10 at 11:48
    
yes .. .exe/.dll/etc –  anand Oct 26 '10 at 11:49
    
Using an object library file,how do i check whether its for 32 bit or 64 bit platforms? –  anand Oct 26 '10 at 12:53
1  
If it is a refinement of your question, please edit it rather than adding a comment. Also, what do you mean by "object library file"? a .lib file? –  CharlesB Oct 26 '10 at 13:32
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marked as duplicate by nawfal, DocMax, Bob Kaufman, Nik Bougalis, Neolisk Feb 26 '13 at 1:21

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8 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can open it with Dependancy Walker, it displays a "64" sign on the icon if it is a 64 bit dll/exe:

alt text

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And you want to run this and screenscrape the result? Sounds like a bad solution. –  leppie Oct 26 '10 at 12:03
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It is not mentioned that the OP wanted a programmatic solution, and no language is specified, so I assume it is a satisfying solution –  CharlesB Oct 26 '10 at 12:11
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Note that Dependency Walker doesn't work with managed (.NET) dlls. For them you can use corflags command-line tool stackoverflow.com/a/1002800/8479 –  Rory Jan 10 '13 at 14:16
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You can use dumpbin which is part of the MS toolchain. Or you can use Dependency Walker if you prefer something visual.

For example, here is the output from dumpbin /headers for the 64 bit kernel32.dll on my system:

Dump of file \windows\system32\kernel32.dll

PE signature found

File Type: DLL

FILE HEADER VALUES
            8664 machine (x64)
               6 number of sections
        4E21213B time date stamp Sat Jul 16 06:27:23 2011
               0 file pointer to symbol table
               0 number of symbols
              F0 size of optional header
            2022 characteristics
                   Executable
                   Application can handle large (>2GB) addresses
                   DLL

And the same for the 32 bit version:

Dump of file \windows\syswow64\kernel32.dll

PE signature found

File Type: DLL

FILE HEADER VALUES
             14C machine (x86)
               4 number of sections
        4E211318 time date stamp Sat Jul 16 05:27:04 2011
               0 file pointer to symbol table
               0 number of symbols
              E0 size of optional header
            2102 characteristics
                   Executable
                   32 bit word machine
                   DLL
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Use dumpbin /HEADERS zlib1.dll|findstr 14C. Details: blog.ringerc.id.au/2012/12/… –  Craig Ringer Dec 6 '12 at 9:29
    
@Craig Yes, that's what I said. –  David Heffernan Dec 6 '12 at 9:30
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[serverfault.com]This might help, which points [stackoverflow.com] to this. Second link is probably of more use - the accepted answer looks to be a C# solution to your problem.

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Check out this link: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/827218

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This KB is for determining wether the OS is 32 bit or 64 bit, not an exe/dll –  CharlesB Oct 26 '10 at 11:56
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TrID is what you're looking for.

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Use the Dependency Walker application on them to determine this. You can also do this programmatically using the GetBinaryType() Win32 API function.

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Just a heads up, GetBinaryType doesn't work for dlls –  pezcode Oct 28 '11 at 17:12
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There is a tool called coreflags.exe you could try it.

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The method of running an executable & then checking in process explorer or similar tool, has some obvious drawbacks:

  1. We have to execute the process.
  2. For the short lived processes (like echo hello world types.), process explorer might not even register that a new process has started.

Dumpbin.exe method can solve the purpose probably.

Another alternative would be to use linux/cygwin's file command. It works well on both windows & Linuxes.

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