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What is a good way to read this XML? Or maybe I can structure the XML differently.

What I want is the process to be the main thing and then you could have any number of related process to follow.

  <Job>
    <Process>*something.exe</Process>
    <RelatedToProcess>*somethingelse.exe</RelatedToProcess>
    <RelatedToProcess>*OneMorething.exe</RelatedToProcess>
  </Job>

I am currently using a XmlNodeList and reading the innertext and then splitting the string on * but I know there has to be a better way.

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You've gotten some good feedback on parsing the XML, but we're kind of in the dark as to what you want to do with the text content. You want to extract the substring before and after the *? –  LarsH Oct 26 '10 at 13:51

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try this console app:

class Program
{
    public class Job
    {
        public string Process { get; set; }
        public IList<string> RelatedProcesses { get; set; }
    }
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var xml = "<Job>" +
                    "<Process>*something.exe</Process>" +
                        "<RelatedToProcess>*somethingelse.exe</RelatedToProcess>" +
                        "<RelatedToProcess>*OneMorething.exe</RelatedToProcess>" +
                      "</Job>";
        var jobXml = XDocument.Parse(xml);

        var jobs = from j in jobXml.Descendants("Job")
                    select new Job
                    {
                        Process = j.Element("Process").Value,
                        RelatedProcesses = (from r in j.Descendants("RelatedToProcess")
                                            select r.Value).ToList()
                    };

        foreach (var t in jobs)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(t.Process);
            foreach (var relatedProcess in t.RelatedProcesses)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(relatedProcess);
            }
        }

        Console.Read();

    }
}
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I suggest you to use Linq To Xml. You can load your xml in XDocument and then access each separate XElement by name or path.

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+1 i too suggest LINQ to XML –  Thorin Oakenshield Oct 26 '10 at 12:30
    
use linq, this should help: msforge.net/blogs/janko/archive/2008/01/31/… –  Kirit Chandran Oct 26 '10 at 12:35

I like to use XmlSerializer for simple tasks like this, as it results in significantly less code to process the XML. All you need is a simple class that maps to your XML, e.g.

public class Job
{
    public string Process { get; set; }

    [XmlElement("RelatedToProcess")]
    public List<string> RelatedProcesses { get; set; }
}

You can then read the XML like this:

XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Job));
using (var reader = XmlReader.Create(@"d:\temp\test.xml"))
{
    Job j = (Job)serializer.Deserialize(reader);
    Console.WriteLine(j.Process);
    Console.WriteLine(j.RelatedProcesses.Count);
    j.RelatedProcesses.ForEach(p => Console.WriteLine(p));
}
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you can use XDocument and XElement

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If you want the Process to be "main thing" I would recommend restructuring XML as

  <Job>
    <Process Name="*.something.exe">
        <RelatedToProcess>*somethingelse.exe</RelatedToProcess>
        <RelatedToProcess>*OneMorething.exe</RelatedToProcess>
    </Process>
  </Job>

This way you can easily get all child elements of "Process" element...And logically they relate (at least to me :)) Whether you use attribute or element is a matter of style...

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XDocument for sure!

XDocument xDoc = XDocument.Load("Process.xml");
var process = from p in xDoc.Descendants("Process")
              select p.Value;

var relatedProcess = from p in xDoc.Descendants("RelatedToProcess")
                     select p.Value;

Console.WriteLine("Process: {0}", process.ElementAtOrDefault(0).ToString());
foreach (var p in relatedProcess)
    Console.WriteLine("RelatedToProcess: {0}", p);

The code will print:

Process: *something.exe
RelatedToProcess: *somethingelse.exe
RelatedToProcess: *OneMorething.exe
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I would actually store it slightly different. Concept is that you create a "Process" complex type and then you reuse it within RelatedProcess and you can make name an attribute if desired.

<Job>
  <Process>something.exe</Process>
  <RelatedProcess>
     <Process>
        <Name>somethingelse.exe</Name>
     </Process>
     <Process>
        <Name>OneMorething.exe
        </Name>
     </Process>
  </RelatedProcess>
</Job>

That would allow for better growth. For instance if you decided to have recursive processeses i.e.:

<Job>
  <Process>
     <Name>something.exe</Name>
     <RelatedProcess>
       <Process>
          <Name>somethingelse.exe</Name>
          <RelatedProcess>
             <Process>
              <Name>recursive.exe</Name>
             </Process>
          </RelatedProcess>
       </Process>
       <Process>
          <Name>OneMorething.exe</Name>
       </Process>
    </RelatedProcess>
  </Process>
</Job>

Here is an XDocument example.. I did not show the recursive creation of processes because i wasn't sure if you wanted to use it.

string xml = "<Job>...xml here ";
XDocument doc =  XDocument.Parse(xml);

var Processess = from process in doc.Elements("Job").Elements("Process")

 select new
{
    ProcessName = process.Element("Name"),
    RelatedProcesses = (from rprocess in process.Elements("RelatedProcess").Elements("Process")
                        select new
                        {
                            ProcessName = rprocess.Element("Name")
                        }
                         ).ToList()
};

Let me know if you have questions.

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