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I wish to have long and short forms of command line options invoked using my shell script. I know that getopts can be used, but like in Perl, I have not been able to do the same with shell.

Any ideas on how this can be done, so that i can use options like:

./shell.sh --copyfile abc.pl /tmp/
./shell.sh -c abc.pl /tmp/

In the above, both the commands mean the same thing to my shell, but using, getopts, I have not been able to implement these?

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23 Answers 23

up vote 140 down vote accepted

The bash getopts builtin does not support long option names with the double-dash prefix. It only supports single-character options.

There is a shell tool getopt which is another program, not a bash builtin. The GNU implementation of getopt(3) (used by the command-line getopt(1) on Linux) supports parsing long options.

But the BSD implementation of getopt (e.g. on Mac OS X) does not.

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18  
Were you reading over my shoulder? :D –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 31 '08 at 6:29
6  
Great minds think alike! –  Bill Karwin Dec 31 '08 at 6:31
4  
So. What is the cross-platform, portable solution? –  troelskn Oct 17 '09 at 23:05
4  
GNU Getopt seems to be the only choice. On Mac, install GNU getopt from macports. On Windows, I'd install GNU getopt with Cygwin. –  Bill Karwin Oct 18 '09 at 4:23
1  
Apparently, ksh getopts can handle long options. –  Tgr Jul 23 '10 at 14:13

The built-in getopts command is still, AFAIK, limited to single-character options only.

There is (or used to be) an external program getopt that would reorganize a set of options such that it was easier to parse. You could adapt that design to handle long options too. Example usage:

aflag=no
bflag=no
flist=""
set -- $(getopt abf: "$@")
while [ $# -gt 0 ]
do
    case "$1" in
    (-a) aflag=yes;;
    (-b) bflag=yes;;
    (-f) flist="$flist $2"; shift;;
    (--) shift; break;;
    (-*) echo "$0: error - unrecognized option $1" 1>&2; exit 1;;
    (*)  break;;
    esac
    shift
done

# Process remaining non-option arguments
...

You could use a similar scheme with a getoptlong command.

Note that the fundamental weakness with the external getopt program is the difficulty of handling arguments with spaces in them, and in preserving those spaces accurately. This is why the built-in getopts is superior, albeit limited by the fact it only handles single-letter options.

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8  
+1 for small example –  Leonel Aug 10 '09 at 18:55
7  
getopt, except for the GNU version (which has a different calling convention), is fundamentally broken. Do not use it. Please use **getopts instead bash-hackers.org/wiki/doku.php/howto/getopts_tutorial –  hendry Aug 20 '09 at 23:21
    
+1 great example –  Tom Auger Jul 18 '11 at 19:31
5  
@hendry - from your own link: "Note that getopts is not able to parse GNU-style long options (--myoption) or XF86-style long options (-myoption)!" –  Tom Auger Jul 18 '11 at 19:32
1  
Jonathan -- you should rewrite the example to use eval set with quotes (see my answer below) so that it also works correctly with GNU getopt (the default on Linux) and handles spaces correctly. –  Urban Vagabond Jul 22 '12 at 0:25

getopt and getopts are different beasts, and people seem to have a bit of misunderstanding of what they do. getopts is a built-in command to bash to process command-line options in a loop and assign each found option and value in turn to built-in variables, so you can further process them. getopt, however, is an external utility program, and it doesn't actually process your options for you the way that e.g. bash getopts, the Perl Getopt module or the Python optparse/argparse modules do. All that getopt does is canonicalize the options that are passed in -- i.e. convert them to a more standard form, so that it's easier for a shell script to process them. For example, an application of getopt might convert the following:

myscript -ab infile.txt -ooutfile.txt

into this:

myscript -a -b -o outfile.txt infile.txt

You have to do the actual processing yourself. You don't have to use getopt at all if you make various restrictions on the way you can specify options: only put one option per argument; all options go before any positional parameters (i.e. non-option arguments); and for options with values (e.g. -o above), the value has to go as a separate argument (after a space).

Why use getopt instead of getopts? The basic reason is that only GNU getopt gives you support for long-named command-line options.1 (GNU getopt is the default on Linux. Mac OS X and FreeBSD come with a basic and not-very-useful getopt, but the GNU version can be installed; see below.)

For example, here's an example of using GNU getopt, from a script of mine called javawrap:

# NOTE: This requires GNU getopt.  On Mac OS X and FreeBSD, you have to install this
# separately; see below.
TEMP=`getopt -o vdm: --long verbose,debug,memory:,debugfile:,minheap:,maxheap: \
             -n 'javawrap' -- "$@"`

if [ $? != 0 ] ; then echo "Terminating..." >&2 ; exit 1 ; fi

# Note the quotes around `$TEMP': they are essential!
eval set -- "$TEMP"

VERBOSE=false
DEBUG=false
MEMORY=
DEBUGFILE=
JAVA_MISC_OPT=
while true; do
  case "$1" in
    -v | --verbose ) VERBOSE=true; shift ;;
    -d | --debug ) DEBUG=true; shift ;;
    -m | --memory ) MEMORY="$2"; shift 2 ;;
    --debugfile ) DEBUGFILE="$2"; shift 2 ;;
    --minheap )
      JAVA_MISC_OPT="$JAVA_MISC_OPT -XX:MinHeapFreeRatio=$2"; shift 2 ;;
    --maxheap )
      JAVA_MISC_OPT="$JAVA_MISC_OPT -XX:MaxHeapFreeRatio=$2"; shift 2 ;;
    -- ) shift; break ;;
    * ) break ;;
  esac
done

This lets you specify options like --verbose -dm4096 --minh=20 --maxhe 40 --debugfi="/Users/John Johnson/debug.txt" or similar. The effect of the call to getopt is to canonicalize the options to --verbose -d -m 4096 --minheap 20 --maxheap 40 --debugfile "/Users/John Johnson/debug.txt" so that you can more easily process them. The quoting around "$1" and "$2" is important as it ensures that arguments with spaces in them get handled properly.

If you delete the first 9 lines (everything up through the eval set line), the code will still work! However, your code will be much pickier in what sorts of options it accepts: In particular, you'll have to specify all options in the "canonical" form described above. With the use of getopt, however, you can group single-letter options, use shorter non-ambiguous forms of long-options, use either the --file foo.txt or --file=foo.txt style, use either the -m 4096 or -m4096 style, mix options and non-options in any order, etc. getopt also outputs an error message if unrecognized or ambiguous options are found.

NOTE: There are actually two totally different versions of getopt, basic getopt and GNU getopt, with different features and different calling conventions.2 Basic getopt is quite broken: Not only does it not handle long options, it also can't even handle handle embedded spaces inside of arguments or empty arguments, whereas getopts does do this right. The above code will not work in basic getopt. GNU getopt is installed by default on Linux, but on Mac OS X and FreeBSD it needs to be installed separately. On Mac OS X, install MacPorts (http://www.macports.org) and then do sudo port install getopt to install GNU getopt (usually into /opt/local/bin), and make sure that /opt/local/bin is in your shell path ahead of /usr/bin. On FreeBSD, install misc/getopt.

A quick guide to modifying the example code for your own program: Of the first few lines, all is "boilerplate" that should stay the same, except the line that calls getopt. You should change the program name after -n, specify short options after -o, and long options after --long. Put a colon after options that take a value.

Finally, if you see code that has just set instead of eval set, it was written for BSD getopt. You should change it to use the eval set style, which works fine with both versions of getopt, while the plain set doesn't work right with GNU getopt.

1Actually, getopts in ksh93 supports long-named options, but this shell isn't used as often as bash. In zsh, use zparseopts to get this functionality.

2Technically, "GNU getopt" is a misnomer; this version was actually written for Linux rather than the GNU project. However, it follows all the GNU conventions, and the term "GNU getopt" is commonly used (e.g. on FreeBSD).

share|improve this answer
    
This was very helpful, the idea of using getopt to check the options and then process those options in a very simple loop worked really well when I wanted to add long style options to a bash script. Thanks. –  ianmjones Dec 21 '11 at 11:48
3  
People seem to have a bit of misunderstanding of what getopt and getopts do. They don't actually process your options for you, [..]. All that they do is canonicalize the options. ----> Thanks for that, exactly what I have been wondering for a while. –  Antoine 'hashar' Musso Jul 11 '12 at 19:35
    
getopt on Linux is not a GNU utility and the traditional getopt doesn't come initially from BSD but from AT&T Unix. ksh93's getopts (also from AT&T) supports GNU-style long options. –  Stephane Chazelas Jan 29 '13 at 15:06
    
@StephaneChazelas -- edited to reflect your comments. I still prefer the term "GNU getopt" even though it's a misnomer, because this version follows GNU conventions and generally acts like a GNU program (e.g. making use of POSIXLY_CORRECT), while "Linux-enhanced getopt" wrongly suggests that this version exists only on Linux. –  Urban Vagabond Jun 24 '13 at 4:07
    
It comes from the util-linux package, so it is Linux only as that bundle of software is meant for Linux only (that getopt could easily be ported to other Unices, but many other software in util-linux are Linux-specific). All non-GNU programs making use of GNU getopt(3) understand $POSIX_CORRECT. For instance, you wouldn't say that aplay is GNU just on those grounds. I suspect that when FreeBSD mention GNU getopt, they mean the GNU getopt(3) C API. –  Stephane Chazelas Jun 24 '13 at 6:39

Here's an example that actually uses getopt with long options:

aflag=no
bflag=no
cargument=none

# options may be followed by one colon to indicate they have a required argument
if ! options=$(getopt -o abc: -l along,blong,clong: -- "$@")
then
    # something went wrong, getopt will put out an error message for us
    exit 1
fi

set -- $options

while [ $# -gt 0 ]
do
    case $1 in
    -a|--along) aflag="yes" ;;
    -b|--blong) bflag="yes" ;;
    # for options with required arguments, an additional shift is required
    -c|--clong) cargument="$2" ; shift;;
    (--) shift; break;;
    (-*) echo "$0: error - unrecognized option $1" 1>&2; exit 1;;
    (*) break;;
    esac
    shift
done
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2  
+1 for the long option example and conditional check of getopt return value. –  Jason McCreary Dec 9 '11 at 18:57
    
You should rewrite the example to use eval set with quotes (see my answer below) so that it also works correctly with GNU getopt (the default on Linux) and handles spaces correctly. –  Urban Vagabond Jul 22 '12 at 0:25
    
This does work with GNU getopt. –  lzap Jul 12 '13 at 8:47
1  
Oh wait, you are right. Adding eval helps! Thanks. –  lzap Jul 12 '13 at 8:57
    
Thanks, very helpful example –  wukong Aug 4 '13 at 16:42

The Bash builtin getopts function can be used to parse long options by putting a dash character followed by a colon into the optspec:

#!/usr/bin/env bash 
optspec=":hv-:"
while getopts "$optspec" optchar; do
    case "${optchar}" in
        -)
            case "${OPTARG}" in
                loglevel)
                    val="${!OPTIND}"; OPTIND=$(( $OPTIND + 1 ))
                    echo "Parsing option: '--${OPTARG}', value: '${val}'" >&2;
                    ;;
                loglevel=*)
                    val=${OPTARG#*=}
                    opt=${OPTARG%=$val}
                    echo "Parsing option: '--${opt}', value: '${val}'" >&2
                    ;;
                *)
                    if [ "$OPTERR" = 1 ] && [ "${optspec:0:1}" != ":" ]; then
                        echo "Unknown option --${OPTARG}" >&2
                    fi
                    ;;
            esac;;
        h)
            echo "usage: $0 [-v] [--loglevel[=]<value>]" >&2
            exit 2
            ;;
        v)
            echo "Parsing option: '-${optchar}'" >&2
            ;;
        *)
            if [ "$OPTERR" != 1 ] || [ "${optspec:0:1}" = ":" ]; then
                echo "Non-option argument: '-${OPTARG}'" >&2
            fi
            ;;
    esac
done

After copying to executable file name=getopts_test.sh in the current working directory, one can produce output like

$ ./getopts_test.sh
$ ./getopts_test.sh -f
Non-option argument: '-f'
$ ./getopts_test.sh -h
usage: code/getopts_test.sh [-v] [--loglevel[=]<value>]
$ ./getopts_test.sh --help
$ ./getopts_test.sh -v
Parsing option: '-v'
$ ./getopts_test.sh --very-bad
$ ./getopts_test.sh --loglevel
Parsing option: '--loglevel', value: ''
$ ./getopts_test.sh --loglevel 11
Parsing option: '--loglevel', value: '11'
$ ./getopts_test.sh --loglevel=11
Parsing option: '--loglevel', value: '11'

Obviously getopts neither performs OPTERR checking nor option-argument parsing for the long options. The script fragment above shows how this may be done manually. The basic principle also works in the Debian Almquist shell ("dash"). Note the special case:

getopts -- "-:"  ## without the option terminator "-- " bash complains about "-:"
getopts "-:"     ## this works in the Debian Almquist shell ("dash")

Note that, as GreyCat from over at http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ points out, this trick exploits a non-standard behaviour of the shell which permits the option-argument (i.e. the filename in "-f filename") to be concatenated to the option (as in "-ffilename"). The POSIX standard says there must be a space between them, which in the case of "-- longoption" would terminate the option-parsing and turn all longoptions into non-option arguments.

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1  
Clever solution, that. Thanks for sharing. –  Carlo Zottmann Jul 4 '12 at 15:45
1  
Doesn't your 'h' case need to go above your '*' in the outer case? –  Rhys Ulerich Sep 21 '12 at 20:12
1  
IMHO better solution stackoverflow.com/questions/402377/… or on stackoverflow.com/questions/4180880/… –  pevik Jul 29 '13 at 11:14
1  
The h) case should appear before the *) one otherwise the latter catch all remaining options so the -h one is never processed. –  jlliagre May 30 at 9:26
    
I bow in your general direction, Master of Bash! –  TomRoche Aug 10 at 22:35

getopt and getopts become very frustrating to use, especially when one has many flags. Keeping the list of options in sync with the case statement used is one thing, but if you need to update a 'usage' function which outputs a listing of all the flags, you easily forget to document your flags.

Take a look at shFlags http://code.google.com/p/shflags/ which is a portable shell library (meaning sh, bash, dash, ksh, zsh on Linux, Solaris, etc.). I wrote to wrap getopt to make the whole process easier. It makes adding new flags as simple as adding one line to your script, and it provides an auto generated usage function.

Here is a simple 'Hello, world!' using shFlags.

#!/bin/sh

# source shflags from current directory
. ./shflags

# define a 'name' command-line string flag
DEFINE_string 'name' 'world' 'name to say hello to' 'n'

# parse the command-line
FLAGS "$@" || exit 1
eval set -- "${FLAGS_ARGV}"

# say hello
echo "Hello, ${FLAGS_name}!"

For OSes that have the enhanced getopt that supports long options (e.g. Linux), you can do:

$ ./hello_world.sh --name Kate
Hello, Kate!

For the rest, you must use the short option:

$ ./hello_world.sh -n Kate
Hello, Kate!

Adding a new flag is as simple as adding a new DEFINE_ call.

kate

share|improve this answer
    
This is great!! i will use it –  Janning Jan 26 '11 at 8:18
    
This is fantastic but unfortunately my getopt (OS X) doesn't support spaces in arguments :/ wonder if there is an alternative. –  Alastair Stuart Mar 16 '11 at 16:16
    
+1 nice one .... –  Felipe Alvarez Apr 8 '11 at 0:27
    
So glad I found this post. Started using shflags and it has made my life easier! –  Anthony Topper Jul 3 '12 at 13:16
    
@AlastairStuart -- there is indeed an alternative on OS X. Use MacPorts to install GNU getopt (it will usually be installed into /opt/local/bin/getopt). –  Urban Vagabond Jul 9 '12 at 5:56

I kind of solved this way:

# A string with command options
options=$@

# An array with all the arguments
arguments=($options)

# Loop index
index=0

for argument in $options
  do
    # Incrementing index
    index=`expr $index + 1`

    # The conditions
    case $argument in
      -a) echo "key $argument value ${arguments[index]}" ;;
      -abc) echo "key $argument value ${arguments[index]}" ;;
    esac
  done

exit;

Am I being dumb or something? getopt and getopts are so confusing.

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1  
This seems to work for me, I don't know what the problem is with this method, but it seems simple, so there must be a reason everyone else is not using it. –  Billy Moon Aug 7 '11 at 10:46
2  
Wow it works so marvelously!! –  Theodore R. Smith Aug 18 '11 at 14:33
1  
@Billy Yes, this is simple because I don't use any script to manage my parameters and etc. Basically I convert the arguments string ($@) to an array and I loop through it. In the loop, current value will be the key and the next one will be the value. Simple as that. –  Rafael Rinaldi Aug 23 '11 at 23:23
1  
@Theodore I'm glad this was helpful to you! It was a pain to me as well. If you're interested, you can see an example of it in action here: raw.github.com/rafaelrinaldi/swf-to-html/master/swf-to-html.sh –  Rafael Rinaldi Aug 23 '11 at 23:24
1  
Simple. It puts down the broad strokes. Thank you very much for you comment... I found you can do --option) or --option=*) on each case to handle both assignment types (spaces or equals). With the later, just process $argument with: value=${argument/*=/""} instead of: ${arguments[index]} to get your value. –  Shaun Sep 13 '12 at 5:59

In case you don't want the getopt dependency, you can do this:

while test $# -gt 0
do
  case $1 in

  # Normal option processing
    -h | --help)
      # usage and help
      ;;
    -v | --version)
      # version info
      ;;
  # ...

  # Special cases
    --)
      break
      ;;
    --*)
      # error unknown (long) option $1
      ;;
    -?)
      # error unknown (short) option $1
      ;;

  # FUN STUFF HERE:
  # Split apart combined short options
    -*)
      split=$1
      shift
      set -- $(echo "$split" | cut -c 2- | sed 's/./-& /g') "$@"
      continue
      ;;

  # Done with options
    *)
      break
      ;;
  esac

  # for testing purposes:
  echo "$1"

  shift
done

Of course, then you can't use long style options with one dash. And if you want to add shortened versions (e.g. --verbos instead of --verbose), then you need to add those manually.

But if you are looking to get getopts functionality along with long options, this is a simple way to do it.

I also put this snippet in a gist.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems to only work with one long option at a time, but it met my need. Thank you! –  kingjeffrey Jan 21 '13 at 19:48
    
In the special case --) there seems to be a shift ; missing. At the moment the -- will stay as first non option argument. –  dgw Jan 31 at 15:06
    
I think that this is actually the better answer, though as dgw points out the -- option needs a shift in there. I say this is better because the alternatives are either platform dependent versions of getopt or getopts_long or you have to force short-options to be used only at the start of the command (i.e - you use getopts then process long options afterwards), whereas this gives any order and complete control. –  Haravikk Feb 19 at 14:18

The built-in getopts can't do this. There is an external getopt(1) program that can do this, but you only get it on Linux from the util-linux package. It comes with an example script getopt-parse.bash.

There is also a getopts_long written as a shell function.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes youre right! –  lzap Aug 22 '11 at 9:14
    
Does getopts_long (above) works on Mac OS X 10.6+ ? –  David Andreoletti Jan 16 '12 at 1:57
    
The getopt was included in FreeBSD version 1.0 in 1993, and has been part of FreeBSD since then. As such, it was adopted from FreeBSD 4.x for inclusion in Apple's Darwin project. As of OS X 10.6.8, the man page included by Apple remains an exact duplicate of the FreeBSD man page. So yes, it's included in OS X and gobs of other operating systems beside Linux. -1 on this answer for the misinformation. –  ghoti Mar 27 '12 at 3:41

** "getopts": with short options AND long options AND short/long arguments **

Works with all combinations, e.G.:

  • foobar -f --bar
  • foobar --foo -b
  • foobar -bf --bar --foobar
  • foobar -fbFBAshorty --bar -FB --arguments=longhorn
  • foobar -fA "text shorty" -B --arguments="text longhorn"
  • bash foobar -F --barfoo
  • sh foobar -B --foobar - ...
  • bash ./foobar -F --bar

#!/bin/bash
# foobar: getopts with short and long options AND arguments

###### some declarations for these example ######

Options=$@
Optnum=$#
sfoo='no '
sbar='no '
sfoobar='no '
sbarfoo='no '
sarguments='no '
sARG=empty
lfoo='no '
lbar='no '
lfoobar='no '
lbarfoo='no '
larguments='no '
lARG=empty

_usage() {
###### U S A G E : Help and ERROR ######
cat <<EOF
 foobar $Options
$*
        Usage: foobar <[options]>
        Options:
                -b   --bar            Set bar to yes    ($foo)
                -f   --foo            Set foo to yes    ($bart)
                -h   --help           Show this message
                -A   --arguments=...  Set arguments to yes ($arguments) AND get ARGUMENT ($ARG)
                -B   --barfoo         Set barfoo to yes ($barfoo)
                -F   --foobar         Set foobar to yes ($foobar)
EOF
}
if [ $# = 0 ]; then _usage "  >>>>>>>> no options given "; fi
##################################################################    
#######  "getopts" with: short options  AND  long options  #######
#######            AND  short/long arguments               #######
while getopts ':bfh-A:BF' OPTION ; do
  case "$OPTION" in
    b  ) sbar=yes                       ;;
    f  ) sfoo=yes                       ;;
    h  ) _usage                         ;;   
    A  ) sarguments=yes;sARG="$OPTARG"  ;;
    B  ) sbarfoo=yes                    ;;
    F  ) sfoobar=yes                    ;;
    -  ) [ $OPTIND -ge 1 ] && optind=$(expr $OPTIND - 1 ) || optind=$OPTIND
         eval OPTION="\$$optind"
         OPTARG=$(echo $OPTION | cut -d'=' -f2)
         OPTION=$(echo $OPTION | cut -d'=' -f1)
         case $OPTION in
             --foo       ) lfoo=yes                       ;;
             --bar       ) lbar=yes                       ;;
             --foobar    ) lfoobar=yes                    ;;
             --barfoo    ) lbarfoo=yes                    ;;
             --help      ) _usage                         ;;
             --arguments ) larguments=yes;lARG="$OPTARG"  ;; 
             * )  _usage " Long: >>>>>>>> invalide options (long) " ;;
         esac
       OPTIND=1
       shift
      ;;
    ? )  _usage "Short: >>>>>>>> invalide options (short) "  ;;
  esac
done
##################################################################
echo "----------------------------------------------------------"
echo "RESULT short-foo      : $sfoo                                 long-foo      : $lfoo"
echo "RESULT short-bar      : $sbar                                 long-bar      : $lbar"
echo "RESULT short-foobar   : $sfoobar                                 long-foobar   : $lfoobar"
echo "RESULT short-barfoo   : $sbarfoo                                 long-barfoo   : $lbarfoo"
echo "RESULT short-arguments: $sarguments  with Argument = \"$sARG\"        long-arguments: $larguments and $lARG"
share|improve this answer
#!/bin/bash
while getopts "abc:d:" flag
do
  case $flag in
    a) echo "[getopts:$OPTIND]==> -$flag";;
    b) echo "[getopts:$OPTIND]==> -$flag";;
    c) echo "[getopts:$OPTIND]==> -$flag $OPTARG";;
    d) echo "[getopts:$OPTIND]==> -$flag $OPTARG";;
  esac
done

shift $((OPTIND-1))
echo "[otheropts]==> $@"

exit

.

#!/bin/bash
until [ -z "$1" ]; do
  case $1 in
    "--dlong")
      shift
      if [ "${1:1:0}" != "-" ]
      then
        echo "==> dlong $1"
        shift
      fi;;
    *) echo "==> other $1"; shift;;
  esac
done
exit
share|improve this answer

Another way...

# translate long options to short
for arg
do
    delim=""
    case "$arg" in
       --help) args="${args}-h ";;
       --verbose) args="${args}-v ";;
       --config) args="${args}-c ";;
       # pass through anything else
       *) [[ "${arg:0:1}" == "-" ]] || delim="\""
           args="${args}${delim}${arg}${delim} ";;
    esac
done
# reset the translated args
eval set -- $args
# now we can process with getopt
while getopts ":hvc:" opt; do
    case $opt in
        h)  usage ;;
        v)  VERBOSE=true ;;
        c)  source $OPTARG ;;
        \?) usage ;;
        :)
        echo "option -$OPTARG requires an argument"
        usage
        ;;
    esac
done
share|improve this answer
    
This is by far the best solution. Very simple and does not require the dreaded "getopt". Thank you! –  Caetano Sauer Dec 15 '13 at 12:19
    
This one is the bomb. Thanks mtvee –  Todd Morrison Jun 7 at 16:24

In ksh93, getopts does support long names...

while getopts "f(file):s(server):" flag
do
    echo "$flag" $OPTIND $OPTARG
done

Or so the tutorials I have found have said. Try it and see.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is ksh93's getopts builtin. Apart from this syntax, it also has a more complicated syntax that also allows long options without a short equivalent, and more. –  jilles Oct 9 '11 at 12:28
1  
A reasonable answer. The OP didn't specify WHAT shell. –  ghoti Mar 27 '12 at 3:44

An improved solution:

# translate long options to short
# Note: This enable long options but disable "--?*" in $OPTARG, or disable long options after  "--" in option fields.
for ((i=1;$#;i++)) ; do
    case "$1" in
        --)
            # [ ${args[$((i-1))]} == ... ] || EndOpt=1 ;;& # DIRTY: we still can handle some execptions...
            EndOpt=1 ;;&
        --version) ((EndOpt)) && args[$i]="$1"  || args[$i]="-V";;
        # default case : short option use the first char of the long option:
        --?*) ((EndOpt)) && args[$i]="$1"  || args[$i]="-${1:2:1}";;
        # pass through anything else:
        *) args[$i]="$1" ;;
    esac
    shift
done
# reset the translated args
set -- "${args[@]}"

function usage {
echo "Usage: $0 [options] files" >&2
    exit $1
}

# now we can process with getopt
while getopts ":hvVc:" opt; do
    case $opt in
        h)  usage ;;
        v)  VERBOSE=true ;;
        V)  echo $Version ; exit ;;
        c)  source $OPTARG ;;
        \?) echo "unrecognized option: -$opt" ; usage -1 ;;
        :)
        echo "option -$OPTARG requires an argument"
        usage -1
        ;;
    esac
done

shift $((OPTIND-1))
[[ "$1" == "--" ]] && shift
share|improve this answer

I have been working on that subject for quite a long time... and made my own library which you will need to source in your main script. See libopt4shell and cd2mpc for an example. Hope it helps !

share|improve this answer

Maybe it's simpler to use ksh, just for the getopts part, if need long command line options, as it can be easier done there.

# Working Getopts Long => KSH

#! /bin/ksh
# Getopts Long
USAGE="s(showconfig)"
USAGE+="c:(createdb)"
USAGE+="l:(createlistener)"
USAGE+="g:(generatescripts)"
USAGE+="r:(removedb)"
USAGE+="x:(removelistener)"
USAGE+="t:(createtemplate)"
USAGE+="h(help)"

while getopts "$USAGE" optchar ; do
    case $optchar in
    s)  echo "Displaying Configuration" ;;
        c)  echo "Creating Database $OPTARG" ;;
    l)  echo "Creating Listener LISTENER_$OPTARG" ;;
    g)  echo "Generating Scripts for Database $OPTARG" ;;
    r)  echo "Removing Database $OPTARG" ;;
    x)  echo "Removing Listener LISTENER_$OPTARG" ;;
    t)  echo "Creating Database Template" ;;
    h)  echo "Help" ;;
    esac
done
share|improve this answer
    
+1 -- Note that this is limited to ksh93 - from the open source AST project (AT&T Research). –  Henk Langeveld Aug 16 '12 at 14:36

I don't have enough rep yet to comment or vote his solution up, but sme's answer worked extremely well for me. The only issue I ran into was that the arguments end up wrapped in single-quotes (so I have an strip them out).

I also added some example usages and HELP text. I'll included my slightly extended version here:

#!/bin/bash

# getopt example
# from: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/402377/using-getopts-in-bash-shell-script-to-get-long-and-short-command-line-options
HELP_TEXT=\
"   USAGE:\n
    Accepts - and -- flags, can specify options that require a value, and can be in any order. A double-hyphen (--) will stop processing options.\n\n

    Accepts the following forms:\n\n

    getopt-example.sh -a -b -c value-for-c some-arg\n
    getopt-example.sh -c value-for-c -a -b some-arg\n
    getopt-example.sh -abc some-arg\n
    getopt-example.sh --along --blong --clong value-for-c -a -b -c some-arg\n
    getopt-example.sh some-arg --clong value-for-c\n
    getopt-example.sh
"

aflag=false
bflag=false
cargument=""

# options may be followed by one colon to indicate they have a required argument
if ! options=$(getopt -o abc:h\? -l along,blong,help,clong: -- "$@")
then
    # something went wrong, getopt will put out an error message for us
    exit 1
fi

set -- $options

while [ $# -gt 0 ]
do
    case $1 in
    -a|--along) aflag=true ;;
    -b|--blong) bflag=true ;;
    # for options with required arguments, an additional shift is required
    -c|--clong) cargument="$2" ; shift;;
    -h|--help|-\?) echo -e $HELP_TEXT; exit;;
    (--) shift; break;;
    (-*) echo "$0: error - unrecognized option $1" 1>&2; exit 1;;
    (*) break;;
    esac
    shift
done

# to remove the single quotes around arguments, pipe the output into:
# | sed -e "s/^'\\|'$//g"  (just leading/trailing) or | sed -e "s/'//g"  (all)

echo aflag=${aflag}
echo bflag=${bflag}
echo cargument=${cargument}

while [ $# -gt 0 ]
do
    echo arg=$1
    shift

    if [[ $aflag == true ]]; then
        echo a is true
    fi

done
share|improve this answer

In order to stay cross-platform compatible, and avoid the reliance on external executables, I ported some code from another language.

I find it very easy to use, here is an example:

ArgParser::addArg "[h]elp"    false    "This list"
ArgParser::addArg "[q]uiet"   false    "Supress output"
ArgParser::addArg "[s]leep"   1        "Seconds to sleep"
ArgParser::addArg "v"         1        "Verbose mode"

ArgParser::parse "$@"

ArgParser::isset help && ArgParser::showArgs

ArgParser::isset "quiet" \
   && echo "Quiet!" \
   || echo "Noisy!"

local __sleep
ArgParser::tryAndGetArg sleep into __sleep \
   && echo "Sleep for $__sleep seconds" \
   || echo "No value passed for sleep"

# This way is often more convienient, but is a little slower
echo "Sleep set to: $( ArgParser::getArg sleep )"

The required BASH is a little longer than it could be, but I wanted to avoid reliance on BASH 4's associative arrays. You can also download this directly from http://nt4.com/bash/argparser.inc.sh

#!/usr/bin/env bash

# Updates to this script may be found at
# http://nt4.com/bash/argparser.inc.sh

# Example of runtime usage:
# mnc.sh --nc -q Caprica.S0*mkv *.avi *.mp3 --more-options here --host centos8.host.com

# Example of use in script (see bottom)
# Just include this file in yours, or use
# source argparser.inc.sh

unset EXPLODED
declare -a EXPLODED
function explode 
{
    local c=$# 
    (( c < 2 )) && 
    {
        echo function "$0" is missing parameters 
        return 1
    }

    local delimiter="$1"
    local string="$2"
    local limit=${3-99}

    local tmp_delim=$'\x07'
    local delin=${string//$delimiter/$tmp_delim}
    local oldifs="$IFS"

    IFS="$tmp_delim"
    EXPLODED=($delin)
    IFS="$oldifs"
}


# See: http://fvue.nl/wiki/Bash:_Passing_variables_by_reference
# Usage: local "$1" && upvar $1 "value(s)"
upvar() {
    if unset -v "$1"; then           # Unset & validate varname
        if (( $# == 2 )); then
            eval $1=\"\$2\"          # Return single value
        else
            eval $1=\(\"\${@:2}\"\)  # Return array
        fi
    fi
}

function decho
{
    :
}

function ArgParser::check
{
    __args=${#__argparser__arglist[@]}
    for (( i=0; i<__args; i++ ))
    do
        matched=0
        explode "|" "${__argparser__arglist[$i]}"
        if [ "${#1}" -eq 1 ]
        then
            if [ "${1}" == "${EXPLODED[0]}" ]
            then
                decho "Matched $1 with ${EXPLODED[0]}"
                matched=1

                break
            fi
        else
            if [ "${1}" == "${EXPLODED[1]}" ]
            then
                decho "Matched $1 with ${EXPLODED[1]}"
                matched=1

                break
            fi
        fi
    done
    (( matched == 0 )) && return 2
    # decho "Key $key has default argument of ${EXPLODED[3]}"
    if [ "${EXPLODED[3]}" == "false" ]
    then
        return 0
    else
        return 1
    fi
}

function ArgParser::set
{
    key=$3
    value="${1:-true}"
    declare -g __argpassed__$key="$value"
}

function ArgParser::parse
{

    unset __argparser__argv
    __argparser__argv=()
    # echo parsing: "$@"

    while [ -n "$1" ]
    do
        # echo "Processing $1"
        if [ "${1:0:2}" == '--' ]
        then
            key=${1:2}
            value=$2
        elif [ "${1:0:1}" == '-' ]
        then
            key=${1:1}               # Strip off leading -
            value=$2
        else
            decho "Not argument or option: '$1'" >& 2
            __argparser__argv+=( "$1" )
            shift
            continue
        fi
        # parameter=${tmp%%=*}     # Extract name.
        # value=${tmp##*=}         # Extract value.
        decho "Key: '$key', value: '$value'"
        # eval $parameter=$value
        ArgParser::check $key
        el=$?
        # echo "Check returned $el for $key"
        [ $el -eq  2 ] && decho "No match for option '$1'" >&2 # && __argparser__argv+=( "$1" )
        [ $el -eq  0 ] && decho "Matched option '${EXPLODED[2]}' with no arguments"        >&2 && ArgParser::set true "${EXPLODED[@]}"
        [ $el -eq  1 ] && decho "Matched option '${EXPLODED[2]}' with an argument of '$2'"   >&2 && ArgParser::set "$2" "${EXPLODED[@]}" && shift
        shift
    done
}

function ArgParser::isset
{
    declare -p "__argpassed__$1" > /dev/null 2>&1 && return 0
    return 1
}

function ArgParser::getArg
{
    # This one would be a bit silly, since we can only return non-integer arguments ineffeciently
    varname="__argpassed__$1"
    echo "${!varname}"
}

##
# usage: tryAndGetArg <argname> into <varname>
# returns: 0 on success, 1 on failure
function ArgParser::tryAndGetArg
{
    local __varname="__argpassed__$1"
    local __value="${!__varname}"
    test -z "$__value" && return 1
    local "$3" && upvar $3 "$__value"
    return 0
}

function ArgParser::__construct
{
    unset __argparser__arglist
    # declare -a __argparser__arglist
}

##
# @brief add command line argument
# @param 1 short and/or long, eg: [s]hort
# @param 2 default value
# @param 3 description
##
function ArgParser::addArg
{
    # check for short arg within long arg
    if [[ "$1" =~ \[(.)\] ]]
    then
        short=${BASH_REMATCH[1]}
        long=${1/\[$short\]/$short}
    else
        long=$1
    fi
    if [ "${#long}" -eq 1 ]
    then
        short=$long
        long=''
    fi
    decho short: "$short"
    decho long: "$long"
    __argparser__arglist+=("$short|$long|$1|$2|$3")
}

## 
# @brief show available command line arguments
##
function ArgParser::showArgs
{
    # declare -p | grep argparser
    printf "Usage: %s [OPTION...]\n\n" "$( basename "${BASH_SOURCE[0]}" )"
    printf "Defaults for the options are specified in brackets.\n\n";

    __args=${#__argparser__arglist[@]}
    for (( i=0; i<__args; i++ ))
    do
        local shortname=
        local fullname=
        local default=
        local description=
        local comma=

        explode "|" "${__argparser__arglist[$i]}"

        shortname="${EXPLODED[0]:+-${EXPLODED[0]}}" # String Substitution Guide: 
        fullname="${EXPLODED[1]:+--${EXPLODED[1]}}" # http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/parameter-substitution.html
        test -n "$shortname" \
            && test -n "$fullname" \
            && comma=","

        default="${EXPLODED[3]}"
        case $default in
            false )
                default=
                ;;
            "" )
                default=
                ;;
            * )
                default="[$default]"
        esac

        description="${EXPLODED[4]}"

        printf "  %2s%1s %-19s %s %s\n" "$shortname" "$comma" "$fullname" "$description" "$default"
    done
}

function ArgParser::test
{
    # Arguments with a default of 'false' do not take paramaters (note: default
    # values are not applied in this release)

    ArgParser::addArg "[h]elp"      false       "This list"
    ArgParser::addArg "[q]uiet" false       "Supress output"
    ArgParser::addArg "[s]leep" 1           "Seconds to sleep"
    ArgParser::addArg "v"           1           "Verbose mode"

    ArgParser::parse "$@"

    ArgParser::isset help && ArgParser::showArgs

    ArgParser::isset "quiet" \
        && echo "Quiet!" \
        || echo "Noisy!"

    local __sleep
    ArgParser::tryAndGetArg sleep into __sleep \
        && echo "Sleep for $__sleep seconds" \
        || echo "No value passed for sleep"

    # This way is often more convienient, but is a little slower
    echo "Sleep set to: $( ArgParser::getArg sleep )"

    echo "Remaining command line: ${__argparser__argv[@]}"

}

if [ "$( basename "$0" )" == "argparser.inc.sh" ]
then
    ArgParser::test "$@"
fi
share|improve this answer

Here you can find a few different approaches for complex option parsing in bash: http://mywiki.wooledge.org/ComplexOptionParsing

I did create the following one, and I think it's a good one, because it's minimal code and both long and short options work. A long option can also have multiple arguments with this approach.

#!/bin/bash
# Uses bash extensions.  Not portable as written.

declare -A longoptspec
longoptspec=( [loglevel]=1 ) #use associative array to declare how many arguments a long option expects, in this case we declare that loglevel expects/has one argument, long options that aren't listed i n this way will have zero arguments by default
optspec=":h-:"
while getopts "$optspec" opt; do
while true; do
    case "${opt}" in
        -) #OPTARG is name-of-long-option or name-of-long-option=value
            if [[ "${OPTARG}" =~ .*=.* ]] #with this --key=value format only one argument is possible
            then
                opt=${OPTARG/=*/}
                OPTARG=${OPTARG#*=}
                ((OPTIND--))    
            else #with this --key value1 value2 format multiple arguments are possible
                opt="$OPTARG"
                OPTARG=(${@:OPTIND:$((longoptspec[$opt]))})
            fi
            ((OPTIND+=longoptspec[$opt]))
            continue #now that opt/OPTARG are set we can process them as if getopts would've given us long options
            ;;
        loglevel)
          loglevel=$OPTARG
            ;;
        h|help)
            echo "usage: $0 [--loglevel[=]<value>]" >&2
            exit 2
            ;;
    esac
break; done
done

# End of file
share|improve this answer

I could not find the features I wanted in existing solutions, so I ended up writing my own. EasyOptions is going to handle short and long options. There is a Ruby and a pure Bash implementation.

Example

#!/bin/bash

## Your Program 1.0
## Copyright (c) 2014 Someone
##
## Program description. Options:
##     --verbose, -v      This is *all* you need to write for defining the option
##     --foobar           This option has no short version.
##     --log-level=LEVEL  This option requires a value.

source easyoptions.sh || exit 1
[[ -n "$verbose"   ]] && echo "Option --verbose was specified"
[[ -n "$foobar"    ]] && echo "Option --foobar was specified"
[[ -n "$log_level" ]] && echo "Option --log-level was specified as $log_level"

for argument in "${arguments[@]}"; do
    echo "Found argument: $argument"
done

Executing:

$ example.sh --foobar --log-level 123 hello
Option --foobar was specified
Option --log-level was specified as 123
Found argument: hello

$ example.sh --log-level
Error: you must specify a value for --log-level.
See --help for usage and options.
share|improve this answer

If all your long options have unique, and matching, first characters as the short options, so for example

./slamm --chaos 23 --plenty test -quiet

Is the same as

./slamm -c 23 -p test -q

You can use this before getopts to rewrite $args:

# change long options to short options

for arg; do 
    [[ "${arg:0:1}" == "-" ]] && delim="" || delim="\""
    if [ "${arg:0:2}" == "--" ]; 
       then args="${args} -${arg:2:1}" 
       else args="${args} ${delim}${arg}${delim}"
    fi
done

# reset the incoming args
eval set -- $args

# proceed as usual
while getopts ":b:la:h" OPTION; do
    .....

Thanks for mtvee for the inspiration ;-)

share|improve this answer

getopts "could be used" for parsing long options as long as you don't expect them to have arguments...

Here's how to:

$ cat > longopt
while getopts 'e:-:' OPT; do
  case $OPT in
    e) echo echo: $OPTARG;;
    -) #long option
       case $OPTARG in
         long-option) echo long option;;
         *) echo long option: $OPTARG;;
       esac;;
  esac
done

$ bash longopt -e asd --long-option --long1 --long2 -e test
echo: asd
long option
long option: long1
long option: long2
echo: test

If you try to use OPTIND for getting a parameter for the long option, getopts will treat it as the first no optional positional parameter and will stop parsing any other parameters. In such a case you'll be better off handling it manually with a simple case statement.

This will "always" work:

$ cat >longopt2
while (($#)); do
    OPT=$1
    shift
    case $OPT in
        --*) case ${OPT:2} in
            long1) echo long1 option;;
            complex) echo comples with argument $1; shift;;
        esac;;

        -*) case ${OPT:1} in
            a) echo short option a;;
            b) echo short option b with parameter $1; shift;;
        esac;;
    esac
done


$ bash longopt2 --complex abc -a --long -b test
comples with argument abc
short option a
short option b with parameter test

Albeit is not as flexible as getopts and you have to do much of the error checking code yourself within the case instances...

But it is an option.

share|improve this answer

sudo port install getopt #external program on Mac OS X

share|improve this answer

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