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Is there any way to compare such strings on bash:

2.4.5 and 2.8 and 2.4.5.1

etc

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10 Answers

up vote 45 down vote accepted

Here is a pure Bash version that doesn't require any external utilities:

#!/bin/bash
vercomp () {
    if [[ $1 == $2 ]]
    then
        return 0
    fi
    local IFS=.
    local i ver1=($1) ver2=($2)
    # fill empty fields in ver1 with zeros
    for ((i=${#ver1[@]}; i<${#ver2[@]}; i++))
    do
        ver1[i]=0
    done
    for ((i=0; i<${#ver1[@]}; i++))
    do
        if [[ -z ${ver2[i]} ]]
        then
            # fill empty fields in ver2 with zeros
            ver2[i]=0
        fi
        if ((10#${ver1[i]} > 10#${ver2[i]}))
        then
            return 1
        fi
        if ((10#${ver1[i]} < 10#${ver2[i]}))
        then
            return 2
        fi
    done
    return 0
}

testvercomp () {
    vercomp $1 $2
    case $? in
        0) op='=';;
        1) op='>';;
        2) op='<';;
    esac
    if [[ $op != $3 ]]
    then
        echo "FAIL: Expected '$3', Actual '$op', Arg1 '$1', Arg2 '$2'"
    else
        echo "Pass: '$1 $op $2'"
    fi
}

# Run tests
# argument table format:
# testarg1   testarg2     expected_relationship
echo "The following tests should pass"
while read -r test
do
    testvercomp $test
done << EOF
1            1            =
2.1          2.2          <
3.0.4.10     3.0.4.2      >
4.08         4.08.01      <
3.2.1.9.8144 3.2          >
3.2          3.2.1.9.8144 <
1.2          2.1          <
2.1          1.2          >
5.6.7        5.6.7        =
1.01.1       1.1.1        =
1.1.1        1.01.1       =
1            1.0          =
1.0          1            =
1.0.2.0      1.0.2        =
1..0         1.0          =
1.0          1..0         =
EOF

echo "The following test should fail (test the tester)"
testvercomp 1 1 '>'

Run the tests:

$ . ./vercomp
The following tests should pass
Pass: '1 = 1'
Pass: '2.1 < 2.2'
Pass: '3.0.4.10 > 3.0.4.2'
Pass: '4.08 < 4.08.01'
Pass: '3.2.1.9.8144 > 3.2'
Pass: '3.2 < 3.2.1.9.8144'
Pass: '1.2 < 2.1'
Pass: '2.1 > 1.2'
Pass: '5.6.7 = 5.6.7'
Pass: '1.01.1 = 1.1.1'
Pass: '1.1.1 = 1.01.1'
Pass: '1 = 1.0'
Pass: '1.0 = 1'
Pass: '1.0.2.0 = 1.0.2'
Pass: '1..0 = 1.0'
Pass: '1.0 = 1..0'
The following test should fail (test the tester)
FAIL: Expected '>', Actual '=', Arg1 '1', Arg2 '1'
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This has some problems. Example outputs: "1.0 < 1", "1 < 1.0", and "1.2 > 2.1" –  Gordon Davisson Oct 26 '10 at 15:50
    
@Gordon: I fixed those bugs. I made the choice that 1.0 > 1 instead of being equal. –  Dennis Williamson Oct 26 '10 at 16:05
    
Found another: "1.1.1 < 1.01.1" but "1.01.1 < 1.1.1". How about replacing the final return 2 with if (( ${#ver1[@]} < ${#ver2[@]} )); then return 2; else return 0; fi? –  Gordon Davisson Oct 26 '10 at 16:26
    
@Gordon: I decided to make 1.0 = 1 so it's consistent with 1.01.1 = 1.1.1. –  Dennis Williamson Oct 26 '10 at 18:48
1  
Looks good now; I withdraw my objections. –  Gordon Davisson Oct 26 '10 at 19:19
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If you have coreutils-7 (in Ubuntu Karmic but not Jaunty) then your sort command should have a -V option (version sort) which you could use to do the comparison:

verlte() {
    [  "$1" = "`echo -e "$1\n$2" | sort -V | head -n1`" ]
}

verlt() {
    [ "$1" = "$2" ] && return 1 || verlte $1 $2
}

verlte 2.5.7 2.5.6 && echo "yes" || echo "no" # no
verlt 2.4.10 2.4.9 && echo "yes" || echo "no" # no
verlt 2.4.8 2.4.10 && echo "yes" || echo "no" # yes
verlte 2.5.6 2.5.6 && echo "yes" || echo "no" # yes
verlt 2.5.6 2.5.6 && echo "yes" || echo "no" # no
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1  
Nice solution. For Mac OSX users, you can use GNU Coreutils gsort. That's available through homebrew: brew install coreutils. Then the above should just be modified to use gsort. –  justsee Apr 1 '13 at 4:33
    
I got it working in a script in Ubuntu precise by removing -e from echo. –  Hannes R. Mar 31 at 12:38
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There probably is no universally correct way to achieve this. If you are trying to compare versions in the Debian package system try dpkg --compare-versions <first> <relation> <second>.

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+1 even it is not quit an answer to the question. But it was very helpful to me nevertheless. –  Arvodan Feb 16 '11 at 13:33
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You can recursively split on . and compare as shown in the following algorithm, taken from here. It returns 10 if the versions are the same, 11 if version 1 is greater than version 2 and 9 otherwise.

#!/bin/bash
do_version_check() {

   [ "$1" == "$2" ] && return 10

   ver1front=`echo $1 | cut -d "." -f -1`
   ver1back=`echo $1 | cut -d "." -f 2-`

   ver2front=`echo $2 | cut -d "." -f -1`
   ver2back=`echo $2 | cut -d "." -f 2-`

   if [ "$ver1front" != "$1" ] || [ "$ver2front" != "$2" ]; then
       [ "$ver1front" -gt "$ver2front" ] && return 11
       [ "$ver1front" -lt "$ver2front" ] && return 9

       [ "$ver1front" == "$1" ] || [ -z "$ver1back" ] && ver1back=0
       [ "$ver2front" == "$2" ] || [ -z "$ver2back" ] && ver2back=0
       do_version_check "$ver1back" "$ver2back"
       return $?
   else
           [ "$1" -gt "$2" ] && return 11 || return 9
   fi
}    

do_version_check "$1" "$2"

Source

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Wow, I had no idea Dell employees could be so helpful. :) Much thanks for the link. –  unhillbilly Oct 29 '10 at 13:42
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GNU sort has an option for it:

printf '2.4.5\n2.8\n2.4.5.1\n' | sort -V

gives:

2.4.5
2.4.5.1
2.8
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1  
The question seems to be about version sort. Consider: echo -e "2.4.10\n2.4.9" | sort -n -t. –  kanaka Oct 26 '10 at 13:46
    
sorting this numerically is not right. You would need to at least normalize the strings first. –  frankc Oct 26 '10 at 19:44
    
@kanaka - You are correct. –  mouviciel Oct 30 '13 at 17:04
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For old version/busybox sort. Simple form provide roughly result and often works.

sort -n

This is escpecial useful on version which contains alpha symbols like

10.c.3
10.a.4
2.b.5
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I came across and solved this problem, to add an additional (and shorter and simpler) answer...

First note, extended shell comparison failed as you may already know...

    if [[ 1.2.0 < 1.12.12 ]]; then echo true; else echo false; fi
    false

Using the sort -t'.'-g (or sort -V as mentioned by kanaka) to order versions and simple bash string comparison I found a solution. The input file contains versions in columns 3 and 4 which I want to compare. This iterates through the list identifying a match or if one is greater than the other. Hope this may still help anyone looking to do this using bash as simple as possible.

while read l
do
    #Field 3 contains version on left to compare (change -f3 to required column).
    kf=$(echo $l | cut -d ' ' -f3)
    #Field 4 contains version on right to compare (change -f4 to required column).
    mp=$(echo $l | cut -d ' ' -f4)

    echo 'kf = '$kf
    echo 'mp = '$mp

    #To compare versions m.m.m the two can be listed and sorted with a . separator and the greater version found.
    gv=$(echo -e $kf'\n'$mp | sort -t'.' -g | tail -n 1)

    if [ $kf = $mp ]; then 
        echo 'Match Found: '$l
    elif [ $kf = $gv ]; then
        echo 'Karaf feature file version is greater '$l
    elif [ $mp = $gv ]; then
        echo 'Maven pom file version is greater '$l
   else
       echo 'Comparison error '$l
   fi
done < features_and_pom_versions.tmp.txt

Thanks to Barry's blog for the sort idea... ref: http://bkhome.org/blog/?viewDetailed=02199

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### the answer is does we second argument is higher
function _ver_higher {
        ver=`echo -ne "$1\n$2" |sort -Vr |head -n1`
        if [ "$2" == "$1" ]; then
                return 1
        elif [ "$2" == "$ver" ]; then
                return 0
        else
                return 1
        fi
}

if _ver_higher $1 $2; then
        echo higher
else
        echo same or less
fi

It's pretty simple and small.

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How about this? Seems to work?

checkVersion() {
subVer1=$1
subVer2=$2

[ "$subVer1" == "$subVer2" ] && echo "Version is same"
echo "Version 1 is $subVer1"
testVer1=$subVer1
echo "Test version 1 is $testVer1"
x=0
while [[ $testVer1 != "" ]]
do
  ((x++))
  testVer1=`echo $subVer1|cut -d "." -f $x`
  echo "testVer1 now is $testVer1"
  testVer2=`echo $subVer2|cut -d "." -f $x`
  echo "testVer2 now is $testVer2"
  if [[ $testVer1 -gt $testVer2 ]]
  then
    echo "$ver1 is greater than $ver2"
    break
  elif [[ "$testVer2" -gt "$testVer1" ]]
  then
    echo "$ver2 is greater than $ver1"
    break
  fi
  echo "This is the sub verion for first value $testVer1"
  echo "This is the sub verion for second value $testVer2"
done
}

ver1=$1
ver2=$2
checkVersion "$ver1" "$ver2"
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This seems obvious, perhaps, but this works for me:

a="2.4.5"
b="2.4.5.1"
[[ "$a" > "$b" ]] && echo "a wins"
[[ "$a" = "$b" ]] && echo "it's a tie"
[[ "$a" < "$b" ]] && echo "b wins"
b wins

Bash/Host info:

$ bash --version
GNU bash, version 4.2.25(1)-release (x86_64-pc-linux-gnu)
Copyright (C) 2011 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>

This is free software; you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.
$ uname -a
Linux laptop 3.8.0-36-generic #52~precise1-Ubuntu SMP Mon Feb 3 21:54:46 UTC 2014 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
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1  
Consider the case where a=2.9 and b=2.10. In this case, a will win even though b is technically the version up. –  dreamlax Apr 1 at 2:25
1  
I see. Nice catch. –  jmervine Apr 4 at 16:29
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