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I currently have method which is trying to find out what the obj is it recieved. It knows is on a certain interface, for example IService but I have code which looks at it and tries to tell me is it is for example Service1 or Service2. I currently a lot of if(obj is thisObj) style statements, what would be the best solution to make this code pretty?

here is a sample of what exactly I have:

    public void DoSomething(IService service)
    {
        if (service is Service1)
        {
            //DO something
        }

        if (service is Service2)
        {
            //DO something else
        }           
    }

now having two isnt too much of a bad thing, but I am looking at having probably 20+ of these which just becomes awful to use.

Any ideas?


ok further details I think are needed and here they are:

prior to this method I have another method which is recieving a xml doc, which it them deserializes into the interface IService, so we have something like this:

    private static void Method(InnerXml)

    {

            var messageObj = (IServiceTask)XmlSerialization.Deserialize(typeof(IServiceTask), InnerXml);

            var service = GetService(messageObj);
            service.PerformTask(xmlDoc);

    }

    private static IService GetService(IServiceTask messageObj)
    {
        var service = new IService ();

        if (messageObj is Task1)
        {
            service = (SomeService)messageObj;
        }

        if (messageObj is Task2)
        {
            service = (SomeOtherService)messageObj;
        }
        return service ;
    }

Hopefully that makes it a bit clearer.

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What is that GetService method doing? It seams to just be defaulting to a "new IService" (which one hopes throws a compile time exception) if the messageObj is not of type A or B. I'd use a collection of allowed types and then return itself if in said collection. –  mlk Oct 26 '10 at 15:37
    
GetService is defining which service to actually use, when .PerformTask() is called. –  JamesStuddart Oct 26 '10 at 15:45
    
That is not how I read the code. The casts are "forgotten" out side of the braces they are in. –  mlk Oct 26 '10 at 15:59
    
Is the code above correct, or does it return a new SomeOtherService/SomeService? –  mlk Oct 26 '10 at 16:04
    
This code isnt tried and tested yet just written, I am stabbing in the dark with what I am trying to achieve, so those cast may well be wrong. I should be ensuring that messageObj becomes a new instance of SomeService/SomeOtherService, to ensure that when .DoSomething() is executed that the correct code runs. –  JamesStuddart Oct 26 '10 at 16:10
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12 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What I believe you want is:

class ServiceFactory 
{
     Dictionary<Type, NewService> serviceCreators;
     ServiceFactory() 
     {
         serviceCreators = new Dictionary<Type, NewService>();
         serviceCreators.Add(typeof(Task1), delegate { return new SomeService(); });
         serviceCreators.Add(typeof(Task2), delegate { return new SomeOtherService(); });
     }

     public IService CreateService(IServiceTask messageObj) 
     {
         if(serviceCreators.Contains(messageObj.GetType()) 
         {
              return serviceCreators[messageObj.GetType()];
         }
         return new DefaultService();
     }
}

delegate IService NewService();

Or maybe to add a new method to IServiceTask - CreateService.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks I will give that a whirl, I will mark as the answer and give will a mark upm as your answer is more thorough and you have put up with my babbling with the issue :) –  JamesStuddart Oct 26 '10 at 16:38
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Can you change IService ?

Add method DoSomething() and implement it in all the services.

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Well, it depends on what the //DO something lines are doing. In some cases it would be appropriate to declare a method in the service interface and put the logic for those operations in the services themselves.

Sometimes, on the other hand, it's code which the service itself ought not to know about - at which point life becomes distinctly uglier :( Sometimes this sort of thing is really hard to avoid. I've occasionally found that a mixture of generics and lambda expressions help, e.g.

ConditionallyExecute<Service1>(service, s1 => s1.CallSomeService1Method());
ConditionallyExecute<Service2>(service, s2 => s2.CallSomeService2Method());
...

where ConditionallyExecute is something like:

private void ConditionallyExecute<T>(object obj, Action<T> action)
    where T : class
{
    T t = obj as T;
    if (t != null)
    {
       action(t);
    }
}

... but I'm not really happy when I do that :(

share|improve this answer
    
Could you use double-dispatch for your currently ugly case? Write the SomeService1Method to SomeServiceNMethods somewhere the service implementations don't know about, then have a dispatchUglyMethod() call in the service implementation, passing in a reference to an object containing all these methods. Each service that just turns around and calls the correct method on the object for its sevice (i.e. service Q calls object.someServiceQMethod) –  Paul Oct 26 '10 at 14:10
    
@Paul: I've never found double dispatch terribly elegant either, to be honest. It's one of those patterns which other people seem to like rather more than I do... –  Jon Skeet Oct 26 '10 at 14:27
    
Or how about using overload resolution for the ugly case: private void DoSomethingWithService(Service1 service) {...} and private void DoSomethingWithService(Service2 service) {...} and public void DoSomething(IService service) { DoSomethingWithService(service); } –  0xA3 Oct 26 '10 at 14:33
    
@0xA3: Overload resolution is performed at compile time not execution time... unless you used C# 4's dynamic type. –  Jon Skeet Oct 26 '10 at 14:43
    
I think Ill add a bit more detail here, the DO Something is actually already in the interface, I was just trying to simplfy the example, I will add an update to the above post. –  JamesStuddart Oct 26 '10 at 15:12
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I like using a dictionary in these scenarios.

Dictionary<Type,Action<IService>>
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As for me - I would really go with doSomething() method on the Interface so that you could implement it in all these classes. You would have:

public void DoSomething(IService service)
{

    service.doSomething();
}
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This doesn't make it any better reading, but maybe better performing (if a service can't be two types at the same time):

    public void DoSomething(IService service)
    {
        if (service is Service1)
        {
            //DO something
        }
        else if (service is Service2)
        {
            //DO something else
        }           
    }

Another approach

Maybe this would be also a possible solution:

private Dictionary<Type, Action<object>> _TypeExecutor;

private void SetupExecutors()
{
    _TypeExecutor = new Dictionary<Type, Action<object>>();

    _TypeExecutor.Add(typeof(Service1), new Action<object>((target) => target.DoSomething()));
    _TypeExecutor.Add(typeof(Service2), new Action<object>((target) =>
        {
            var instance = (Service2)target;
            var result = instance.DoSomething();
        }));
    _TypeExecutor.Add(typeof(Service3), AnotherMethod);

}

private void AnotherMethod(object target)
{
    var instance = (Service3)target;
    var result = instance.DoSomething();
}

private void DoWork(ISomething something)
{
    Action<object> action;

    if (_TypeExecutor.TryGetValue(something.GetType(), out action))
    {
        action(something);
    }
}
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Generally speaking, if you think you must do something like in your code, this is a strong sign that there is something wrong with your design. If you pass an IService interface to the method, then the intention should ideally be that it wants to call a method on that interface - without caring what implementation is behind!

But apart from that. it might be useful in your case to have some sort of Servicetype property on your IService interface (ideally this would return an enum value), which you could then check with a switch statement. This of course wouldn't reduce the necessary number of logical branches (you won't be able to reduce it without refactoring your architecture), but at least this would significantly reduce the necessary amount of code.

Thomas

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I have the above tasktype identifier already, but I need to ensure the IService is running the DoSomething() against the correct service class. –  JamesStuddart Oct 26 '10 at 15:24
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If the functionality does not rightly belong in IService then either Wills Command pattern and a Map of some type or by using the visitor pattern.

The latter requires you to add a new method IService.Visit and create interface IServiceVisitor with the methods Visit(Service1) and Visit(Service2) (etc).

Example:

interface IService 
{
    void Visit(IServiceVisitor visitor);
}

class Service1 : IService
{
    void Visit(IServiceVisitor visitor) 
    {
        visitor.Visit(this);
    }
}


class Service2 : IService
{
    void Visit(IServiceVisitor visitor) 
    {
        visitor.Visit(this);
    }
}

interface IServiceVisitor 
{
    void Visit(Service1 service);
    void Visit(Service2 service);
}

class ClassThatDoesStuff : IServiceVisitor 
{
{
    void Visit(Service1 service) 
    {
         // Service one code
    }
    void Visit(Service2 service) 
    {
         // Service two code
    }

    public void DoSomething(IService service) 
    {
         serivce.Visit(this);
    }
}
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use polymorphism, it's a very simple solution.

class Abstract
{
  function something();
}

class A inherit Abstract
{
  override something()
}

class B inherit Abstract
{
  override something()
}


function foo (Abstract input)
{
 input->something()
}
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2  
You're assuming that the operation rightly belongs in the Service1 (etc) class. That may well not be the case. –  Jon Skeet Oct 26 '10 at 14:28
    
@Jon: True. Arguably though, if it is such a common operation, it should be shimmed into the inheritance tree anyway(somehow). No? –  Paul Nathan Oct 26 '10 at 14:59
1  
Paul: I'd disagree, IMO Abstract should only have a Something method if that Something method belongs to "Abstract". If it does not I'd use double dispatch or commands & a map. –  mlk Oct 26 '10 at 15:11
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Assuming you want to execute certain method according to the actual type, you can use GetMethod on the instance, and if the method exists invoke it.

public void DoSomething(IService service)
{
    System.Reflection.MethodInfo method = service.GetType().GetMethod("MySpecialMethod");
    if (method != null)
        method.Invoke(service, null);
}

This way you won't have to check the type at all, just check if the method exists - kind of walking around the tree, so I hope this approach is useful.

You can also use array of possible methods and iterating over them, checking each and have more elegant code this way.

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Like others have said, the easiest solution would be for this logic to be done inside of your IService implementations themselves through an added method.

If this functionality really does not belong inside of IService though, the Visitor pattern would a much better solution than a large number of instanceof checks.

You would create an interface like

public interface IServiceHandler {
    void handleService1(Service1 s);
    void handleService2(Service2 s);
    // add more methods for every existing subclass of IService
}

With an implementation that handles the logic currently inside of DoSomething, but with every branch separated into it's own method:

public class ServiceHandler : IServiceHandler {
    public void handleService1(Service1 s) { ... }
    public void handleService2(Service2 s) { ... }
}

IService would then need one addition method:

void accept(IServiceHandler sh);

which would be implemented in the specific implementations like

public class Service1 : IService {
    ...
    public void accept(IServiceHandler sh) { sh.handleService1(this); }
    ....
}

and analogous for the other implementations.

Your original DoSomething() method can then be rewritten as

public void DoSomething(IService service) {
    service.accept(new ServiceHandler());
}

The advantage of this approach is that your logic will be much better segregated, as well as slightly more performant as it no longer uses any instanceof checks or casts.

Also, if you ever add a new implementation of IService, the compiler will force you to add the appropriate handler for it (as it needs to implement the accept() method, which can only be done by adding the appropriate case to IServiceHandler as well), whereas with a solution dependent on a number of type-checks, it would be easy to forget to add the appropriate extra case.

Last but not least, if you ever were to need any other types of handlers, you could do so without needing any further changes to IService; you would simply create a new IServiceHandler implementation with the new logic.

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If you write the Service classes yourself, interfaces are the way to go. If Foo() should be called on the object if its either a Service1 or a Service2 then they should implement a common interface and you just check if its either one of the two and then run the relevant code.

If they classes cant be changed, however, then I think youre out of luck. 20+ completely different classes which should have 20+ completely different sets of logic applied to them must simply... be handled differently.

Or am I missing some C# magic here? Every time I see code like this I think of how Go implement interfaces.

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You are correct this is how Im doing it, Im just wondering if there is a better way of I dentifying the different classes. –  JamesStuddart Oct 26 '10 at 15:27
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