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I am trying to parse some dates that are coming out of a document. It would appear users have entered these dates in a similar but not exact format.

here are the formats: 9/09 9/2009 09/2009 9/1/2009 9-1-2009

What is the best way to go about trying to parse all of these? These seem to be the most common, but I guess what is hanging me up is that if i have a pattern of "M/yyyy" wont that always catch before "MM/yyyy" Do I have to set up my try/catch blocks nested in a least restrictive to most restrictive way? it seems like it sure is going to take a lot of code duplication to get this right.

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Well, you could just have a list of patterns, and then a simple loop to keep trying until you hit one that works. –  Pointy Oct 26 '10 at 14:14
    
And then simply break the loop? –  Derek Oct 26 '10 at 14:16
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5 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

You'll need to use a different SimpleDateFormat object for each different pattern. That said, you don't need that many different ones, thanks to this:

Number: For formatting, the number of pattern letters is the minimum number of digits, and shorter numbers are zero-padded to this amount. For parsing, the number of pattern letters is ignored unless it's needed to separate two adjacent fields.

So, you'll need these formats:

  • "M/y" (that covers 9/09, 9/2009, and 09/2009)
  • "M/d/y" (that covers 9/1/2009)
  • "M-d-y" (that covers 9-1-2009)

So, my advice would be to write a method that works something like this (untested):

// ...
String[] formatStrings = {"M/y", "M/d/y", "M-d-y"};
// ...

Date tryParse(String dateString)
{
    for (String formatString : formatStrings)
    {
        try
        {
            return new SimpleDateFormat(formatString).parse(dateString);
        }
        catch (ParseException e) {}
    }

    return null;
}
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Matt's approach above is fine, but please be aware that you will run into problems if you use it to differentiate between dates of the format y/M/d and d/M/y. For instance, a formatter initialised with y/M/d will accept a date like 01/01/2009 and give you back a date which is clearly not what you wanted. I fixed the issue as follows, but I have limited time and I'm not happy with the solution for 2 main reasons:

  1. It violates one of Josh Bloch's quidelines, specifically 'don't use exceptions to handle program flow'.
  2. I can see the getDateFormat() method becoming a bit of a nightmare if you needed it to handle lots of other date formats.

If I had to make something that could handle lots and lots of different date formats and needed to be highly performant, then I think I would use the approach of creating an enum which linked each different date regex to its format. Then use MyEnum.values() to loop through the enum and test with if(myEnum.getPattern().matches(date)) rather than catching a dateformatexception.

Anway, that being said, the following can handle dates of the formats 'y/M/d' 'y-M-d' 'y M d' 'd/M/y' 'd-M-y' 'd M y' and all other variations of those which include time formats as well:

import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Date;

public class DateUtil {
    private static final String[] timeFormats = {"HH:mm:ss","HH:mm"};
    private static final String[] dateSeparators = {"/","-"," "};

    private static final String DMY_FORMAT = "dd{sep}MM{sep}yyyy";
    private static final String YMD_FORMAT = "yyyy{sep}MM{sep}dd";

    private static final String ymd_template = "\\d{4}{sep}\\d{2}{sep}\\d{2}.*";
    private static final String dmy_template = "\\d{2}{sep}\\d{2}{sep}\\d{4}.*";

    public static Date stringToDate(String input){
    Date date = null;
    String dateFormat = getDateFormat(input);
    if(dateFormat == null){
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Date is not in an accepted format " + input);
    }

    for(String sep : dateSeparators){
        String actualDateFormat = patternForSeparator(dateFormat, sep);
        //try first with the time
        for(String time : timeFormats){
        date = tryParse(input,actualDateFormat + " " + time);
        if(date != null){
            return date;
        }
        }
        //didn't work, try without the time formats
        date = tryParse(input,actualDateFormat);
        if(date != null){
        return date;
        }
    }

    return date;
    }

    private static String getDateFormat(String date){
    for(String sep : dateSeparators){
        String ymdPattern = patternForSeparator(ymd_template, sep);
        String dmyPattern = patternForSeparator(dmy_template, sep);
        if(date.matches(ymdPattern)){
        return YMD_FORMAT;
        }
        if(date.matches(dmyPattern)){
        return DMY_FORMAT;
        }
    }
    return null;
    }

    private static String patternForSeparator(String template, String sep){
    return template.replace("{sep}", sep);
    }

    private static Date tryParse(String input, String pattern){
    try{
        return new SimpleDateFormat(pattern).parse(input);
    }
    catch (ParseException e) {}
    return null;
    }


}
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In Apache commons lang, DateUtils class we have a method called parseDate. We can use this for parsing the date.

Also another library Joda-time also have the method to parse the date.

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This solution checks all the possible formats before throwing an exception. This solution is more convenient if you are trying to test for multiple date formats.

Date extractTimestampInput(String strDate){
    final List<String> dateFormats = Arrays.asList("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.SSS", "yyyy-MM-dd");    

    for(String format: dateFormats){
        SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat(format);
        try{
            return sdf.parse(strDate);
        } catch (ParseException e) {
             //intentionally empty
        }
    }
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid input for date. Given '"+strDate+"', expecting format yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.SSS or yyyy-MM-dd.");

}
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What about just defining multiple patterns? They might come from a config file containing known patterns, hard coded it reads like:

List<SimpleDateFormat> knownPatterns = new ArrayList<SimpleDateFormat>();
knownPatterns.add(new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss'Z'"));
knownPatterns.add(new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm.ss'Z'"));
knownPatterns.add(new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss"));
knownPatterns.add(new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd' 'HH:mm:ss"));
knownPatterns.add(new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ssXXX"));

for (SimpleDateFormat pattern : knownPatterns) {
    try {
        // Take a try
        return new Date(pattern.parse(candidate).getTime());

    } catch (ParseException pe) {
        // Loop on
    }
}
System.err.println("No known Date format found: " + candidate);
return null;
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