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I am experiencing issues with a WCF REST service. The wire object that I try to return has certain properties not set, resulting in DateTime.MinValue for properties of type DateTime. The service returns an empty document (with HTTP status 200 ???). When I try to call JSON serialization myself, the exception that is thrown is:

SerializationException: DateTime values that are greater than DateTime.MaxValue or smaller than DateTime.MinValue when converted to UTC cannot be serialized to JSON.

This can be reproduced by running the following code in a console app:

DataContractJsonSerializer ser = new DataContractJsonSerializer(typeof(DateTime));
MemoryStream m = new MemoryStream();
DateTime dt = DateTime.MinValue;

// throws SerializationException in my timezone
ser.WriteObject(m, dt);
string json = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(m.GetBuffer());
Console.WriteLine(json);

Why is this behaviour? I think it is related to my timezone (GMT+1). As DateTime.MinValue is default(DateTime), I would expect that this can be serialized without problems.

Any tips on how to make my REST service behave? I don't want to change my DataContract.

share|improve this question
    
Can you make your DateTime nullable and use null as the default value? –  Gabe Oct 26 '10 at 16:57
    
@Gabe: I guess I could. Feels stupid to change my type to work around a serialization detail. But it is probably the most pragmatic road. –  Teun D Oct 26 '10 at 19:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 36 down vote accepted

The main problem is DateTime.MinValue has DateTimeKind.Unspecified kind. It is defined as:

MinValue = new DateTime(0L, DateTimeKind.Unspecified);

But this is not a real problem, this definition leads to problem during serialization. JSON DateTime serialization done through:

System.Runtime.Serialization.Json.JsonWriterDelegator.WriteDateTime(DateTime value)

Unfortunately it is defined as:

...

if (value.Kind != DateTimeKind.Utc)
{
    long num = value.Ticks - TimeZone.CurrentTimeZone.GetUtcOffset(value).Ticks;
    if ((num > DateTime.MaxValue.Ticks) || (num < DateTime.MinValue.Ticks))
    {
        throw DiagnosticUtility.ExceptionUtility.ThrowHelperError(XmlObjectSerializer.CreateSerializationException(SR.GetString("JsonDateTimeOutOfRange"), new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("value")));
    }
}

...

So it doesn't take into account Unspecified and treats it as Local. To avoid this situation you can define your own constant:

MinValueUtc = new DateTime(0L, DateTimeKind.Utc);

or

MinValueUtc = DateTime.MinValue.ToUniversalTime();

It looks weird of course, but it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
That is a nice explanation. This also explains why XML serialization works and JSON doesn't. My problem is that the MinValue is there because it is not set. Instead of adding a simple attribute, I will now have to set this custom MinValueUtc to all datetime properties. –  Teun D Oct 26 '10 at 19:49
    
You may consider working (or just store) with datetimes always in UTC converting to LocalTime just before you need to show them. So after init either in constructor or just in proper setter convert 'incoming' datetime value to UTC via .ToUniversalTime(). It helps resolve default value problem. –  Nick Martyshchenko Oct 26 '10 at 20:09
    
saved me a lot of time, many thanks! –  Bogdan_Ch Sep 13 '11 at 9:31
    
Good question and response, I was running into the same problem. –  Jerry Liang Mar 14 '13 at 23:27

using this constructor:

public DataContractJsonSerializer(Type type, IEnumerable<Type> knownTypes, int maxItemsInObjectGraph, bool ignoreExtensionDataObject, IDataContractSurrogate dataContractSurrogate, bool alwaysEmitTypeInformation)

example code:

DataContractJsonSerializer serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(o.GetType(), null, int.MaxValue, false, new DateTimeSurrogate(), false);

 public class DateTimeSurrogate : IDataContractSurrogate
    {

        #region IDataContractSurrogate 成员

        public object GetCustomDataToExport(Type clrType, Type dataContractType)
        {
            return null;
        }

        public object GetCustomDataToExport(System.Reflection.MemberInfo memberInfo, Type dataContractType)
        {
            return null;
        }

        public Type GetDataContractType(Type type)
        {
            return type;
        }

        public object GetDeserializedObject(object obj, Type targetType)
        {
                   return obj;
        }

        public void GetKnownCustomDataTypes(System.Collections.ObjectModel.Collection<Type> customDataTypes)
        {

        }

        public object GetObjectToSerialize(object obj, Type targetType)
        {
            if (obj.GetType() == typeof(DateTime))
            {
                DateTime dt = (DateTime)obj;
                if (dt == DateTime.MinValue)
                {
                    dt = DateTime.MinValue.ToUniversalTime();
                    return dt;
                }
                return dt;
            }
            if (obj == null)
            {
                return null;
            }
            var q = from p in obj.GetType().GetProperties()
                    where (p.PropertyType == typeof(DateTime)) && (DateTime)p.GetValue(obj, null) == DateTime.MinValue
                    select p;
            q.ToList().ForEach(p =>
            {
                p.SetValue(obj, DateTime.MinValue.ToUniversalTime(), null);
            });
            return obj;
        }

        public Type GetReferencedTypeOnImport(string typeName, string typeNamespace, object customData)
        {
            return null;
        }

        public System.CodeDom.CodeTypeDeclaration ProcessImportedType(System.CodeDom.CodeTypeDeclaration typeDeclaration, System.CodeDom.CodeCompileUnit compileUnit)
        {
            return typeDeclaration;
        }

        #endregion
    }
share|improve this answer
    
So, where would I use this constructor? I currently just add WebMessageFormat.Json to the WebInvoke attribute. Any hints to how to combine this technique in the declaritive style? –  Teun D May 23 '11 at 19:35

If your time zone is GMT+1, then the UTC value of DateTime.MinValue in your time zone is going to be an hour less than DateTime.MinValue.

share|improve this answer
4  
Yes, I figured as much. But what to do? Isn't it weird that the default value of a very common class from the framework cannot be serialized in one half of the world? –  Teun D Oct 26 '10 at 19:44

Try to add this on any DateTime Member

[DataMember(IsRequired = false, EmitDefaultValue = false)]

Most of these erros happens because the default value of the datetime is DateTime.MinValue which is from year of 1 and the JSON serialization is from year 1970.

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