Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a open source effort to port VCL (Delphi Lib) to .NET

share|improve this question
    
    
Is there a need for that? If I was a .NET developer, I would probably use the WPF. –  Andreas Rejbrand Oct 26 '10 at 20:32
    
@Andreas: But unless Google points you to SO, the question should be asked here. –  Henk Holterman Oct 26 '10 at 20:45
    
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

ShineOn is a free and open source port of most of the RTL to .Net. Not the VCL though.

share|improve this answer
add comment

No. The original VCL.NET source is available but not open.

share|improve this answer
    
How do you know there's no such effort? Did you check everywhere? –  Rob Kennedy Oct 26 '10 at 22:46
    
@Rob: I'm not 100% sure but from what I heard a few years back (patents) I consider it very unlikely. –  Henk Holterman Oct 27 '10 at 7:14
add comment

Yes, VCL.NET, available for years. It's open-source (you get the source code when you buy Delphi).

However, VCL.NET was just a migration layer for those who wanted to bring their existing VCL applications to .NET with minimal effort. This didn't have much success though, so VCL.NET seems to have been dropped.

In fact .NET Framework is to large extent a copy of VCL. It shares the same design concepts, very similar class hierarchy in many areas, similar UI designer etc. . It's no wonder, as they both were designed by the same person.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Henk 1) definition of open source changes over time. There's nothing to discuss here: if you get the source, it's open. If you don't, it's closed. 2) It owes to many things, but it's most close to VCL. 3) I stand corrected –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Oct 26 '10 at 21:04
2  
@Eugene: All that means is that some people who write some things on Wikipedia don't know what they're talking about. (Which is no big surprise.) See opensource.org/osd.html for the official Open Source Definition. –  Mason Wheeler Oct 26 '10 at 21:21
2  
Just to set the record straight and part of the reason for the confusion regarding VCL's influence on .NET, is that it suffers from a couple levels of indirection. Accoprding to MS, the lineage of .NET stems from J++ and WFC... However, with WFC it's design was influenced by Anders Hejlsberg, since that is what he went to MS to originally do. Since most of those that worked on WFC and J++ moved on, there is a very pervasive attitude that .NET came from WFC which was assumed to have been fully and independently developed with no external influence. WinForms was mechanically ported from WFC. –  Allen Bauer Oct 26 '10 at 22:02
1  
@Allen while the indirection does exist, the similarity between VCL and later .NET Framework (at least in the aspects I mentioned) is quite obvious, no? I mean if the developers looked at VCL (they don't need to have developed VCL before, they just need a copy of documentation to study), they could get inspiration in VCL. Or am I wrong? –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Oct 27 '10 at 9:31
1  
@Eugene - I was actually trying to refute Henk's claim that ".NET is only slightly related to VCL. It owes to VB, MFC and java as well." I've had direct experience with some of those (from those within MS) that try to deny the link between VCL, Delphi and .NET. Yes, there have been other external influences, but most of the time the denial comes from ignorance rather than actually educating themselves. IOW, you are very correct in your assessment that VCL and .NET clearly share a common lineage. BTW, MFC itself owes a lot to Borland's OWL (Object Windows Library). –  Allen Bauer Oct 27 '10 at 14:29
show 11 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.