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If I have a vararg Java method foo(Object ...arg) and I call foo(null, null), I have both arg[0] and arg[1] as nulls. But if I call foo(null), arg itself is null. Why is this happening?

How should I call foo such that foo.length == 1 && foo[0] == null is true?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 42 down vote accepted

The issue is that when you use the literal null, Java doesn't know what type it is supposed to be. It could be a null Object, or it could be a null Object array. For a single argument it assumes the latter.

You have two choices. Cast the null explicitly to Object or call the method using a strongly typed variable. See the example below:

public class Temp{
   public static void main(String[] args){
      foo("a", "b", "c");
      foo(null, null);
      foo((Object)null);
      Object bar = null;
      foo(bar);
   }

   private static void foo(Object...args) {
      System.out.println("foo called, args: " + asList(args));
   }
}

Output:

foo called, args: [a, b, c]
foo called, args: [null, null]
foo called, args: [null]
foo called, args: [null]
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Would be helpful to others if you had listed the asList method in the sample, and its purpose. –  Arun Kumar Jun 19 at 5:34
1  
@ArunKumar asList() is a static import from the java.util.Arrays class. I just assumed it was obvious. Although now that I'm thinking about it, I probably should have just used Arrays.toString() since the only reason it gets converted to a List is so it will print pretty. –  Mike Deck Jun 20 at 6:17

You need an explicit cast to Object:

foo((Object) null);

Otherwise the argument is assumed to be the whole array that the varargs represents.

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Not really, see my post. –  Buhake Sindi Oct 26 '10 at 21:27
7  
well, I think you are wrong :) –  Bozho Oct 26 '10 at 21:30
    
Oops, same here...sorry, midnight oil. –  Buhake Sindi Oct 26 '10 at 21:34

You need to understand what varargs does. The varargs method takes an arbitrary number of values and puts the value into an array before the method is invoked.

if you do foo(null); it is translated as foo(Object[] arg) since 1 value is passed. Since its only 1 parameter value passed, it's loosely interpreted as Object[] args = null and that's why args is null in your case.

foo(null, null) potentially creates an Object[] arg where arg[0] = arg[1] = null;

Hope this helps.

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1  
I'm not sure your explanation makes sense. When you do foo(null), the method is still foo(Object[] arg)... the null is just getting interpreted as the whole Object[] arg rather than the single element of arg. Varargs cannot change the actual type of the parameter based on the number of arguments to the method. –  ColinD Oct 26 '10 at 21:28
    
@ColinD, thanks...I didn't realise my mistake there. Reupdated. –  Buhake Sindi Oct 26 '10 at 21:36

A Test Case to illustrate this:

The Java code with a vararg-taking method declaration (which happens to be static):

public class JavaReceiver {
    public static String receive(String... x) {
        String res = ((x == null) ? "null" : ("an array of size " + x.length));
        return "received 'x' is " + res;
    }
}

This Java code (a JUnit4 test case) calls the above (we are using the test case not to test anything, just to generate some output):

import org.junit.Test;

public class JavaSender {

    @Test
    public void sendNothing() {
        System.out.println("sendNothing(): " + JavaReceiver.receive());
    }

    @Test
    public void sendNullWithNoCast() {
        System.out.println("sendNullWithNoCast(): " + JavaReceiver.receive(null));
    }

    @Test
    public void sendNullWithCastToString() {
        System.out.println("sendNullWithCastToString(): " + JavaReceiver.receive((String)null));
    }

    @Test
    public void sendNullWithCastToArray() {
        System.out.println("sendNullWithCastToArray(): " + JavaReceiver.receive((String[])null));
    }

    @Test
    public void sendOneValue() {
        System.out.println("sendOneValue(): " + JavaReceiver.receive("a"));
    }

    @Test
    public void sendThreeValues() {
        System.out.println("sendThreeValues(): " + JavaReceiver.receive("a", "b", "c"));
    }

    @Test
    public void sendArray() {
        System.out.println("sendArray(): " + JavaReceiver.receive(new String[]{"a", "b", "c"}));
    }
}

Running this as a JUnit test yields:

sendNothing(): received 'x' is an array of size 0
sendNullWithNoCast(): received 'x' is null
sendNullWithCastToString(): received 'x' is an array of size 1
sendNullWithCastToArray(): received 'x' is null
sendOneValue(): received 'x' is an array of size 1
sendThreeValues(): received 'x' is an array of size 3
sendArray(): received 'x' is an array of size 3

To make this more interesting, let's call the receive() function from Groovy 2.1.2 and see what happens. It turns out that the results are not the same! This may be a bug though.

import org.junit.Test

class GroovySender {

    @Test
    void sendNothing() {
        System.out << "sendNothing(): " << JavaReceiver.receive() << "\n"
    }

    @Test
    void sendNullWithNoCast() {
        System.out << "sendNullWithNoCast(): " << JavaReceiver.receive(null) << "\n"
    }

    @Test
    void sendNullWithCastToString() {
        System.out << "sendNullWithCastToString(): " << JavaReceiver.receive((String)null) << "\n"
    }

    @Test
    void sendNullWithCastToArray() {
        System.out << "sendNullWithCastToArray(): " << JavaReceiver.receive((String[])null) << "\n"
    }

    @Test
    void sendOneValue() {
        System.out << "sendOneValue(): " + JavaReceiver.receive("a") << "\n"
    }

    @Test
    void sendThreeValues() {
        System.out << "sendThreeValues(): " + JavaReceiver.receive("a", "b", "c") << "\n"
    }

    @Test
    void sendArray() {
        System.out << "sendArray(): " + JavaReceiver.receive( ["a", "b", "c"] as String[] ) << "\n"
    }

}

Running this as a JUnit test yields the following, with the difference to Java highlighted in bold.

sendNothing(): received 'x' is an array of size 0
sendNullWithNoCast(): received 'x' is null
sendNullWithCastToString(): received 'x' is null
sendNullWithCastToArray(): received 'x' is null
sendOneValue(): received 'x' is an array of size 1
sendThreeValues(): received 'x' is an array of size 3
sendArray(): received 'x' is an array of size 3
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This is because a varargs method can be called with an actual array rather than a series of array elements. When you provide it with the ambiguous null by itself, it assumes the null is an Object[]. Casting the null to Object will fix this.

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I prefer

foo(new Object[0]);

to avoid Null pointer exceptions.

Hope it helps.

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1  
Well, if it is a vararg method, why not just call it like foo()? –  BrainStorm.exe Mar 11 at 0:05

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