Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any neat trick to slice a binary number into groups of five digits in python?

'00010100011011101101110100010111' => ['00010', '00110', '10111', ... ]

Edit: I want to write a cipher/encoder in order to generate "easy to read over the phone" tokens. The standard base32 encoding has the following disadvantages:

  • Potential to generate accidental f*words
  • Uses confusing chars like chars like 'I', 'L', 'O' (may be confused with 0 and 1)
  • Easy to guess sequences ("AAAA", "AAAB", ...)

I was able to roll my own in 20 lines of python, thanks everybody. My encoder leaves off 'I', 'L', 'O' and 'U', and the resulting sequences are hard to guess.

share|improve this question
    
Wow! Thanks people! –  Paulo Scardine Oct 26 '10 at 22:14
    
Why do you have a number as a base 2 string? why not an actual integer? –  Allen Oct 26 '10 at 22:38
    
I need to write encoder/cipher to generate "easy to read over the phone" tokens and my first idea was some sort of base32 encoding, each digit in base32 is 5 binary digits. –  Paulo Scardine Oct 26 '10 at 22:48
2  
well say that, then. base64.b32encode(yourstring). –  Allen Oct 26 '10 at 22:52
    
@Allen: see my edit –  Paulo Scardine Oct 27 '10 at 14:02

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted
>>> a='00010100011011101101110100010111'
>>> [a[i:i+5] for i in range(0, len(a), 5)]
['00010', '10001', '10111', '01101', '11010', '00101', '11']
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Like this solution the most, as it uses basic stuff and is quite readable. –  helpermethod Oct 26 '10 at 22:11
>>> [''.join(each) for each in zip(*[iter(s)]*5)]
['00010', '10001', '10111', '01101', '11010', '00101']

or:

>>> map(''.join, zip(*[iter(s)]*5))
['00010', '10001', '10111', '01101', '11010', '00101']

[EDIT]

The question was raised by Greg Hewgill, what to do with the two trailing bits? Here are some possibilities:

>>> from itertools import izip_longest
>>>
>>> map(''.join, izip_longest(*[iter(s)]*5, fillvalue=''))
['00010', '10001', '10111', '01101', '11010', '00101', '11']
>>>
>>> map(''.join, izip_longest(*[iter(s)]*5, fillvalue=' '))
['00010', '10001', '10111', '01101', '11010', '00101', '11   ']
>>>
>>> map(''.join, izip_longest(*[iter(s)]*5, fillvalue='0'))
['00010', '10001', '10111', '01101', '11010', '00101', '11000']
share|improve this answer
    
I will just pad it first to the length in bits of the maximum value (which is a multiple of 5, so there will never be any trailing bits). –  Paulo Scardine Aug 9 '13 at 5:48

Per your comments, you actually want base 32 strings.

>>> import base64
>>> base64.b32encode("good stuff")
'M5XW6ZBAON2HKZTG'
share|improve this answer
    
I would like to avoid base64.b32encode('-\x04\xac\x10') –  Paulo Scardine Aug 9 '13 at 6:05

How about using a regular expression?

>>> import re
>>> re.findall('.{1,5}', '00010100011011101101110100010111')
['00010', '10001', '10111', '01101', '11010', '00101', '11']

This will break though if your input string contains newlines, that you want in the grouping.

share|improve this answer
>>> l = '00010100011011101101110100010111'
>>> def splitSize(s, size):
...     return [''.join(x) for x in zip(*[list(s[t::size]) for t in range(size)])]
...  
>>> splitSize(l, 5)
['00010', '10001', '10111', '01101', '11010', '00101']
>>> 
share|improve this answer

Another way to group iterables, from the itertools examples:

def grouper(n, iterable, fillvalue=None):
    "grouper(3, 'ABCDEFG', 'x') --> ABC DEF Gxx"
    args = [iter(iterable)] * n
    return izip_longest(fillvalue=fillvalue, *args)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.