Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It is very common to write a loop and remember the previous.

I want a generator that does that for me. Something like:

import operator

def foo(it):
    it = iter(it)
    f = it.next()
    for s in it:
        yield f, s
        f = s

Now subtract pair-wise.

L = [0, 3, 4, 10, 2, 3]

print list(foo(L))
print [x[1] - x[0] for x in foo(L)]
print map(lambda x: -operator.sub(*x), foo(L)) # SAME

Outputs:

[(0, 3), (3, 4), (4, 10), (10, 2), (2, 3)]
[3, 1, 6, -8, 1]
[3, 1, 6, -8, 1]
  • What is a good name for this operation?
  • What is a better way to write this?
  • Is there a built-in function that does something similar?
  • Trying to use 'map' didn't simplify it. What does?
share|improve this question
    
The list comprehension is already trivially simple, and it's the obvious and natural way to do this. Going from that to the much more obscure map suggests you're overthinking this. The generator function is also already simple and straightforward. –  Glenn Maynard Oct 27 '10 at 2:13
    
it's looks like en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bigram, aka ngram when n is 2 –  sunqiang Oct 27 '10 at 7:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

[y - x for x,y in zip(L,L[1:])]

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Why didn't I think of that. I like it a lot. –  Eddy Pronk Oct 28 '10 at 0:47
    
+1 for simplicity and portability. –  Johnsyweb Oct 28 '10 at 9:06
l = [(0,3), (3,4), (4,10), (10,2), (2,3)]
print [(y-x) for (x,y) in l]

Outputs: [3, 1, 6, -8, 1]

share|improve this answer
    
The construct used in the print statement is called a "list comprehension." –  Matt Caldwell Oct 27 '10 at 2:10

Recipe from iterools:

from itertools import izip, tee
def pairwise(iterable):
    "s -> (s0,s1), (s1,s2), (s2, s3), ..."
    a, b = tee(iterable)
    next(b, None)
    return izip(a, b)

and then:

>>> L = [0, 3, 4, 10, 2, 3]
>>> [b - a for a, b in pairwise(L)]
[3, 1, 6, -8, 1]

[EDIT]

Also, this works (Python < 3):

>>> map(lambda(a, b):b - a, pairwise(L))
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the name pairwise and composing it using itertools. –  Eddy Pronk Oct 28 '10 at 0:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.