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I have a non-Java project that produces a versioned build artifact, and I want to upload this to a Nexus repository. Because the project isn't Java, it doesn't use Maven for builds. And I'd rather not introduce Maven/POM files just to get files into Nexus.

The links on blogs to the Nexus REST API all end up at a sign-in wall, with no "create user" link that I can see.

So, what's the best (or any reasonable) way to upload build artifacts to a Nexus repository without Maven? "bash + curl" would be great, or even a Python script.

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Note, make sure you have a settings.xml in ~/.m2 with the appropriate servers & auth defined. –  Adam Vandenberg Oct 27 '10 at 21:39

6 Answers 6

up vote 34 down vote accepted

Have you considering using the Maven command-line to upload files?

mvn deploy:deploy-file \
    -Durl=$REPO_URL \
    -DrepositoryId=$REPO_ID \
    -DgroupId=org.myorg \
    -DartifactId=myproj \
    -Dversion=1.2.3  \
    -Dpackaging=zip \
    -Dfile=myproj.zip

This will automatically generate the Maven POM for the artifact.

Update

The following Sonatype article states that the "deploy-file" maven plugin is the easiest solution, but it also provides some examples using curl:

https://support.sonatype.com/entries/22189106-How-can-I-programatically-upload-an-artifact-into-Nexus-

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1  
Looking into this now; is there a way to tell Maven not to download and cache a bunch of junk before doing the upload? –  Adam Vandenberg Oct 27 '10 at 21:09
1  
Nevermind; apparently that was maven plugin self-updating going on. –  Adam Vandenberg Oct 27 '10 at 21:14
1  
Ok, works for me. Thanks! –  Adam Vandenberg Oct 27 '10 at 21:37

Using curl:

curl -v \
    -F "r=releases" \
    -F "g=com.acme.widgets" \
    -F "a=widget" \
    -F "v=0.1-1" \
    -F "p=tar.gz" \
    -F "file=@./widget-0.1-1.tar.gz" \
    -u myuser:mypassword \
    http://localhost:8081/nexus/service/local/artifact/maven/content

You can see what the parameters mean here: https://support.sonatype.com/entries/22189106-How-can-I-programatically-upload-an-artifact-into-Nexus-

To make the permissions for this work I created a new role in the admin GUI and I added two privileges to that role: Artifact Download and Artifact Upload. Then I added that role to the default deployment user.

You won't find this in the REST API documentation that comes bundled with the Nexus server, so these parameters might change in the future.

On a Sonatype JIRA issue, it was mentioned that they "are going to overhaul the REST API (and the way it's documentation is generated) in an upcoming release, most likely later this year".

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+1 I found the sonatype link separately and updated my post –  Mark O'Connor Jan 7 at 9:09

No need to use these commands .. you can directly use the nexus web Interface in order to upload your JAR using GAV parameters.

enter image description here

So it is very simple.

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12  
A GUI doesn't help; I need to be able to upload via a command-line script used as part of a build process. –  Adam Vandenberg Feb 22 '11 at 18:51
    
Well, it translates to a HTTP POST request, don't you think? –  Yngve Sneen Lindal Oct 10 '13 at 7:54

The calls that you need to make against Nexus are REST api calls.

The maven-nexus-plugin is a Maven plugin that you can use to make these calls. You could create a dummy pom with the necessary properties and make those calls through the Maven plugin.

Something like:

mvn -DserverAuthId=sonatype-nexus-staging -Dauto=true nexus:staging-close

Assumed things:

  1. You have defined a server in your ~/.m2/settings.xml named sonatype-nexus-staging with your sonatype user and password set up - you will probably already have done this if you are deploying snapshots. But you can find more info here.
  2. Your local settings.xml includes the nexus plugins as specified here.
  3. The pom.xml sitting in your current directory has the correct Maven coordinates in its definition. If not, you can specify the groupId, artifactId, and version on the command line.
  4. The -Dauto=true will turn off the interactive prompts so you can script this.

Ultimately, all this is doing is creating REST calls into Nexus. There is a full Nexus REST api but I have had little luck finding documentation for it that's not behind a paywall. You can turn on the debug mode for the plugin above and figure it out however by using -Dnexus.verboseDebug=true -X.

You could also theoretically go into the UI, turn on the Firebug Net panel, and watch for /service POSTs and deduce a path there as well.

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In ruby https://github.com/RiotGames/nexus_cli A CLI wrapper around Sonatype Nexus REST calls.

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