Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a 2d array matrix[10][10] that I'd like to inspect at debug time.

I understand that I can do this in GDB using

p *matrix@10

But it outputs this in one line, making it difficult to read.

Is there a way to have this output formatted in any way, lets say as a matrix?

share|improve this question
    
in C++ or objective C or C or what? –  Armen Tsirunyan Oct 27 '10 at 10:15
    
@Armen: In any of them, lets say I have an array int matrix[10][10]. –  Nocturne Oct 27 '10 at 17:18
    
set print array on will make gdb print pretty –  yuan Jan 23 at 9:18
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

An important feature of GDB is the ability of execute functions in the debugged code, so you can implement whatever printing you like, for example:

#include <stdio.h>

int matrix[10][10];

void print(int matrix[10][10])
{
    int i, j;
    for (i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
    {
        for (j = 0; j < 10; ++j)
            printf("%d ", matrix[i][j]);
        printf("\n");
    }
}

int main()
{
    int i, j;
    for (i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
        for (j = 0; j < 10; ++j)
            matrix[i][j] = i*10 + j;
    return 0;
}

After compiling this code with -g switch and running under GDB you can use the print function as follows:

(gdb) call print(matrix)
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 
40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 
50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 
60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 
70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 
80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 
90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 
share|improve this answer
add comment

You could always define a function in GDB to do the same thing. If you had the following c code:

#include <stdio.h>
#define ARRAY_SIZE 5

void printArray(int array[ARRAY_SIZE][ARRAY_SIZE]) {
  int y;

  for (y = 0; y < ARRAY_SIZE; y++) {
    printf("[%d,%d,%d,%d,%d]\n",
        array[y][0],
        array[y][1],
        array[y][2],
        array[y][3],
        array[y][4]);
  }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  int matrix[ARRAY_SIZE][ARRAY_SIZE] = {
    {1,2,3,4,5},
    {5,1,2,3,4},
    {4,5,1,2,3},
    {3,4,5,1,2},
    {2,3,4,5,1},
  };

  printArray(matrix);

  return 0;
}

You could then define the following GDB function (or something similar to it):

(gdb) define printMatrix
Type commands for definition of "printmatrix".
End with a line saying just "end".
>set $arr = $arg0
>set $y = 0
>while $y < 5
 >printf "[%d,%d,%d,%d,%d]\n",$arr[$y][0],$arr[$y][1],$arr[$y][2],$arr[$y][3],$arr[$y][4]
 >set $y = $y + 1
 >end
>end

which would result in the following output:

(gdb) printMatrix matrix
[1,2,3,4,5]
[5,1,2,3,4]
[4,5,1,2,3]
[3,4,5,1,2]
[2,3,4,5,1]
(gdb) 

You could just as easily use nested while loops in your GDB function. And, as noted in a previous answer you can always just call the printArray function in your program from within GDB.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This is a more helpful extension of the last post. Also you can use: print var @cols@rows

define printMatrix
set $arr = $arg0
set $rows = $arg1
set $cols = $arg2
set $i = 0
printf "\n"
while $i < $rows
set $j = 0
while $j < $cols
printf "%8.4f,",$arr[$i*$cols + $j]
set $j = $j + 1
end
printf "\n"
set $i = $i + 1
end
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.