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Iterating over a NULL terminated string using for_each is possible:

const char *name = "Bob";

void func(const char &arg)
{
   cout << arg;
}

int main()
{
    for_each(name, name + strlen(name), func);
}

Is something similar possible for a NULL terminated list of strings (without having to determine the total length of the list first) such as:

const char *names[] = { "Bob", "Adam", "Simon", NULL };
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3  
In C++ a list of strings should be represented using std::list<std::string> (or std::vector if that suits better). This would solve all your problems at once. –  Björn Pollex Oct 27 '10 at 12:25
2  
In what way similar? You are determining the length of your string in your example. –  eq- Oct 27 '10 at 12:26
    
@eq- I realise I am determining the length of the string in my example, but I would prefer not to. Also when there is a single string determining the length is trivial, but with a large array of strings it becomes more tedious. I really want something I can pass in as the end iterator that will cause the ending NULL in the array to be detected as the end of the list by for_each automatically. –  Andrew Cecil Oct 27 '10 at 12:31
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10 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

std::for_each "iterates" over a range, so to use it with an array of indeterminate length, you need to use custom iterators to signal the end of the array (on NULL member). If you insist on using NULL-terminated char* array, you could of course create your own for_each function for it, for example like this:

template <typename Function>
void for_each_in_null_terminated_cstring_array(const char** array, Function f)
{
    while (*array) {
        f(*array);
        array++;
    }
}

const char *names[] = { "Bob", "Adam", "Simon", NULL };
for_each_in_null_terminated_cstring_array(names, func);

I'm not really recommending this solution, though.

edit: Yes, more general is always more better, isn't it?

template <typename T, typename Function>
void for_each_in_null_terminated_array(T* array, Function f)
{
    while (*array) {
        f(*array);
        array++;
    }
}

(Here's the implementation of a null terminated ("false"-terminated) iterator I mentioned earlier - with a change or two based on suggestions below. It should be a real InputIterator)

template <class T>
class nt_iterator: public std::iterator<std::input_iterator_tag, T>
{
public:
    typedef typename nt_iterator<T>::pointer pointer;
    typedef typename nt_iterator<T>::value_type value_type;

    nt_iterator(): p(), pte(true) {}
    nt_iterator(pointer p_): p(p_), pte(!p_) {}
    nt_iterator(const nt_iterator<T>& rhs): p(rhs.p), pte(rhs.pte) {}
    nt_iterator<T>& operator++() {
        ++p;
        if (!*p) pte = true; // once past-the-end, always past-the-end
        return *this;
    }
    nt_iterator<T> operator++(int) {
        nt_iterator n(*this);
        operator++();
        return n;
    }
    bool operator==(const nt_iterator<T>& rhs) {
        return pte && rhs.pte || p == rhs.p;
    }
    bool operator!=(const nt_iterator<T>& rhs) {
        return !(operator==(rhs));
    }
    value_type operator*() { return *p; }

private:
    pointer p;
    bool pte; // past-the-end flag
};

And how it's used:

void print(const char* str);

int main()
{
    const char* array[] = {"One", "Two", "Three", NULL, "Will you see this?"};
    std::for_each(nt_iterator<const char*>(array),
                  nt_iterator<const char*>(),
                  print);
}

It's probably a bit slower than the loop version, because of the increased amount of equivalence checks - the speed difference is of course insignificant compared to, for example, printing text - but one should note that std::for_each does not magically make looping faster (in fact, you might be surprised to see how your compiler vendor defines the function - that is, if you are expecting too much).

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2  
No, you don't need to determine the length by definition. This is possible with custom iterators. It'd be ugly, but it can be done. –  larsmans Oct 27 '10 at 12:46
    
Still, +1 as I recommend this solution. –  larsmans Oct 27 '10 at 13:13
    
This is quite handy! Small critiques: I would say that you oughtn't to use == NULL and should rely on either operator! or == T(), e.g., pte = !*p;. Also, the usual way of specifying a generic past-the-end iterator is with the default constructor, as for example std::istream_iterator. –  Jon Purdy Oct 29 '10 at 19:33
    
(I re-added the code I pulled because it seemed unnecessary) I agree - I've kind of mixed NULL's and negations here and there. I actually first used pte = !*p but I was thinking all pointers and thought it seemed too tricky - it'd be the version I'd use in my own code, tho ;) –  eq- Oct 29 '10 at 20:31
    
Looks great to me. I'll definitely use something like this if I ever run across a case for it. –  Jon Purdy Oct 29 '10 at 20:44
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With

const char *names[] = { "Bob", "Adam", "Simon" };

you can just call

std::for_each(names, names + sizeof(names)/sizeof(names[0]), func );

or, nicer, using two helper functions:

std::for_each(begin(names), end(names), func );

Of course, this fails the moment the array decays into a pointer (but at least the compiler won't accept it then). If you must rely on that trailing NULL, you either need to write your own looping function or count before-hand, as with std::strlen():

std::ptr_diff_t num = std::find( names
                               , names + std::numeric_limits<std::size_t>::max()
                               , NULL);
std::for_Each( names, names+num, func );
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3  
Strictly speaking, you are determining the length of the array... –  larsmans Oct 27 '10 at 12:35
    
And with the NULL terminated array of strings this technique works if you substract one from the end pointer - "names + sizeof(names)/sizeof(names[0]) - 1". –  Andrew Cecil Oct 27 '10 at 12:39
    
@Andrew: Either that or make func() capable of dealing with NULL arguments. –  sbi Oct 27 '10 at 12:40
    
@larsmans: I have no idea what you're referring to. –  sbi Oct 27 '10 at 12:40
1  
I am referring to the OP's requirement "without having to determine the total length of the list first". You're using sizeof to do just that. –  larsmans Oct 27 '10 at 12:44
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Expanding on Basilevs answer with a fully working solution.

A custom iterator may be defined as follows:

template <class T>
class NullTerminatedIterator
    :public std::iterator<std::forward_iterator_tag,
    T,ptrdiff_t,const T*,const T&>
{
public:
    typedef NullTerminatedIterator<T> NTI;

    NullTerminatedIterator(T * start): current(start) {}
    NTI & operator++() {current++; return *this;}
    T & operator*() { return *current; } 
    static NTI end() { return NTI(0); }
    bool operator==(const NTI & that) { return *current == *that.current; }
    bool operator!=(const NTI & that) { return *current != *that.current; }
private:
    T * current;
};

And then used like so:

const char *names[] = {"Bob", "Adam", "Simon", NULL};

NullTerminatedIterator<char*> iter((char**)names);

for_each(iter, NullTerminatedIterator<char*>::end(), func);

The base class for the NullTerminatedIterator are taken from this custom iterator question.

This only traverses the list during the for_each call, as requested.

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@Basilevs - Are you referring to the static function or the static const variable nullNTI? This code runs correctly in VS2010. –  Andrew Cecil Oct 28 '10 at 6:22
    
@Basilevs: Thanks, i've corrected it in the answer. –  Andrew Cecil Oct 28 '10 at 10:27
    
@Basilevs - Maybe it was just the cast of 0 to (T*) that I needed, but it wouldn't compile in VS2010 when trying to initialise with NTI(0). –  Andrew Cecil Oct 28 '10 at 11:11
    
@Basilevs - Turns out the NTI(0) not working was just a consequence of something else not compiling at the time - fixed in answer now, along with correct use of NullTerminatedIterator in for_each line. Thanks again! –  Andrew Cecil Oct 28 '10 at 12:03
    
Damn, I've just noticed you are an OP :) –  Basilevs Oct 28 '10 at 15:32
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There have been multiple answers that tell you what you can do instead. However the answer to your particular question is just "no, you can't" :)

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See my edited answer. –  sbi Oct 27 '10 at 12:41
    
@sbi: nah... that still iterates over the sequence two times, I think what the OP wants is that the range be iterated once. But with for_each. I believe it's impossible –  Armen Tsirunyan Oct 27 '10 at 12:43
    
Yes, he can. See my reply to eq-'s answer. –  larsmans Oct 27 '10 at 12:51
1  
Yeah, it's possible. You just need to write an iterator type in which the end iterator is "special" and doesn't point to a specific location, but instead just compares equal to any iterator that points to a null value. It's kind of similar to the stream iterators already in the standard library. –  jalf Oct 27 '10 at 13:11
1  
@Armen: I never said it was worth it. Just that it is possible ;) (It's also one of the stronger arguments in favor of Alexandrescu's "iterators must go" thing. Something like this would be much more natural to express as a range.) –  jalf Oct 27 '10 at 14:41
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template <class T>
struct NullTerminatedIterator {
  typedef NullTerminatedIterator<T> NTI;
  T * current;
  NTI & operator++() {current++; return this;}
  T & operator*() {return *current;} 
  NullTerminatedIterator(T * start): current(start) {}
  static NTI end() {return  NTI(0);}
  bool operator==(const NTI & that) {return current==that.current;}

}
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I think this is what I want, but I can't quite get it to work in practice. What would the for_each line look like using this iterator? –  Andrew Cecil Oct 27 '10 at 17:25
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You can use sizeof() for compile-time sized arrays.

const char *names[] = { "Bob", "Adam", "Simon" };
std::for_each(names, names + sizeof(names)/sizeof(*names), [](const char* arg) {
    std::cout << arg << "\n";
});
std::cin.get();

For dynamically sized arrays, you should be using std::vector<std::string> and iterate over that.

Excuse my use of lambdas, your compiler (probably) doesn't support them.

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add them to a container instead, and iterate over them using for_each
i use a vector for my example:

void function(string name)
{
    cout << name;
}

int main()
{
    vector<string> nameVector;

    nameVector.push_back("Bob");
    nameVector.push_back("Adam");
    nameVector.push_back("Simon");

    for_each(nameVector.begin(), nameVector.end(), function);

    return 0;
}
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Can you not replace the argument passed to func with a reference to a pointer to const char, in order to achieve what you want. Kind of like this:

const char *names[] = { "Bob", "Adam", "Simon" };

void func( const char* &arg )
{
   cout << arg << endl;
}

int main()
{
    for_each( names, 
              names + sizeof( names ) / sizeof( names[ 0 ] ), 
              func );
}

And obviously for a NULL-terminated string array, just subtract 1 from the array size...

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I know this is not for_each, but I wanted to use old regular for-loop to do the same. This one is from the MSDN blog:

This reinterpretation of a double-null-terminated string as really a list of strings with an empty string as the terminator makes writing code to walk through a double-null-terminated string quite straightforward:

for (LPTSTR pszz = pszzStart; *pszz; pszz += lstrlen(pszz) + 1) {
   // ... do something with pszz ...
}

Looks kinda clean to me!

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    // C version 
    const char* vars[16]={"$USER","$HOME","$DISPLAY","$PASSWORD",0};

    for(const char** pc = vars; *pc!=0; pc++)
    {
            printf("%s",*pc);
    }
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