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Solution 1 :

foreach (var item in itemList)
{
   myContext.ExecuteStoreCommand("EXEC MyProc {0};", item); // Insertion
}

or

Solution 2 :

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
foreach (var item in itemList)
{
   sb.AppendLine(String.Format("EXEC MyProc {0};", item)); // Insertion
}
myContext.ExecuteStoreCommand(sb.ToString());
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5  
These things are called stored procedures - NOT store procedures.... –  marc_s Oct 27 '10 at 14:04
    
The confusion seems to be wrt to SQL server and Entity framework 4.0. The former is slightly better known in the community ;-). But still STORED procedure and STORE command are different things. –  Noel Abrahams Oct 27 '10 at 14:39

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Second is faster (one call to the database instead of multiple), first is safer since it protects against SQL injection.

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both are second one is subject to sql injection, that is for sure

by reading this and this, I agree with kekekela

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The first isn't since its using a parameterized command. –  heisenberg Oct 27 '10 at 14:07
    
@Justin - the documentation regarding ExecuteStoreCommand indicates that the OP's first statement does in fact generate a parameterized command: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee358758.aspx –  JeremyDWill Oct 27 '10 at 14:15
    
@kekekela, I updated my answer –  Fredou Oct 27 '10 at 14:15

I would guess Solution 2 because there is less I/O between your application and the database. If speed is all you're concerned with, you could check for yourself by debugging with the System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch utility.

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Test results : Solution 2 is twice fast as Solution 1 –  Patrice Pezillier Oct 27 '10 at 14:12
    
Seems like a lot of people suspected it would be. That being said, I'd strongly urge you to consider the others' points about security/sql injection risks. Just because it's the fastest way doesn't necessarily mean it's the best way. –  Jeremy Wiggins Oct 27 '10 at 14:16

This sounds like an opportunity for a small optimization which is easily tested.

Likely they are very close to the same speed.

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Test results : Solution 2 is twice fast as Solution 1 –  Patrice Pezillier Oct 27 '10 at 14:13
    
Are we talking 1ms vs. 2ms? –  codekaizen Oct 27 '10 at 14:24

Solution 2 is faster as its only a single call to myContext.ExecuteStoreCommand so less overhead from method calls through the context object

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Test results : Solution 2 is twice fast as Solution 1 –  Patrice Pezillier Oct 27 '10 at 14:12

The one you haven't mentioned.

Prepare an SqlCommand with the stored procedure's name as the CommandText, the CommandType set to CommandType.StoredProcedure, and the params appropriately added.

Besides the performance gain from not using an ad-hoc query (that'd have to be reparsed each time), you'll also nip most of your current SQL injection issues in the bud.

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