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I'm using a numbers matching table, from one upwards. However, I realize I need to start at zero instead. Can't figure it out..

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS util_nums (n integer primary key 
    autoincrement not null);

insert into util_nums(n) select null from (select 0 as n union select 1 
union select 2 union select 3 union select 4 union select 5 union select 6 
union select 7 union select 8 union select 9 union select 10) a 
    cross join 
(select 0 as n union select 1 union select 2 union select 3 union select 4 
union select 5 union select 6 union select 7 union select 8 union select 9 
union select 10) b 
    cross join (select 0 as n union select 1 union select 2 
union select 3 union select 4 union select 5 union select 6 union select 7 
union select 8 union select 9 union select 10) c;
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What are you trying to do? It's not clear. –  egrunin Oct 27 '10 at 14:33
    
your query is trying to add 1331 nulls into a non-null field, that is also auto-incremented... destined to fail in sql server.. what environment are you working with ? –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Oct 27 '10 at 14:35
    
Is this MySQL, or some other RDBMS? If you want to know syntax it's quite important to know... –  MatBailie Oct 27 '10 at 14:39
    
I'm using sqlite. I have values 1,2,3,4 etc I need to start from zero. –  Jules Oct 27 '10 at 14:41
    
posted some possible solutions for sqlite.. –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Oct 27 '10 at 14:55

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Sqlite allows you to insert explicit values for the primary key fields:

insert into util_nums(n) values (0);

to Get a lot more rows insert quickly try this after that..

insert into util_nums default values;
insert into util_nums(n) select null from util_nums a, util_nums b, util_nums c, util_nums d;
insert into util_nums(n) select null from util_nums a, util_nums b, util_nums c, util_nums d;
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Thanks this answers my question, but its a lot slower, 3 seconds as compared to less than 1 second for my insert query, shame, would have been better to have more values. –  Jules Oct 27 '10 at 15:03
    
If you do it in a transaction it will be faster ;) Mine has 104,994 numbers in it at the end, yours has 1,331. How many do you NEED is the real question –  My Other Me Oct 28 '10 at 6:09

in sql server it would be easy if you create your table like this

CREATE TABLE util_nums (n as int primary key 
    identity(0,1) not null,anotherfieldtoholdthenulls integer);

the identity(0,1) means start from zero and increment by 1 ..

update

try using UPDATE SQLITE_SEQUENCE SET seq = -1 WHERE name = 'util_nums' before starting the insert, and see if it is allowed....

You should also be able to do INSERT INTO util_nums VALUES(0)

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you can temporarly disable auto increment using

 SET sql_mode = 'NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO';

But I suggest update value to 0 after insert

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I need to use a query, I don't think I ca use SET with sqlite. –  Jules Oct 27 '10 at 14:42

If you're useing SQLite you should probably read this http://www.sqlite.org/autoinc.html . This caught my eye:

If the table has never before contained any data, then a ROWID of 1 is used.

It doesn't seem to be any way to force autoincrement to start from something other than 1. Also note that it may generate gaps by skipping numbers.


This may work but I have no means of testing at the moment:
Add a row with an ID of -1. Then delete it. It isn't clear from the documentation what happens when you have only negative IDs in the table.

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"SQLite Autoincrement"

The important part seems to be...

If no negative ROWID values are inserted explicitly, then automatically
generated ROWID values will always be greater than zero.

So? Create the table, insert a dummy record, with a forced id of -1, and then insert your data. Deleting the dummy record afterwards as/if necessary.

(Inserting a value with -1 will force the next inserted rwo to have an id of 0, assuming the table was otherwise empty.)

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SQLite allows you to specify a value here.

Just insert c.n - 1, from your cartesian product, instead of null, and call it a day.

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