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I want to print all prime numbers that are 2-digits long. Here is my code:

    for(int input = 11; input <= 99; input += 2){
        for(int x = 2; x < (int)Math.sqrt(input) + 1; x++){
            if(input%x != 0){
                System.out.println(input);
                break;
            }else{
                break;
            }
        }
    }

The problem is that it prints numbers like 35 or 49 which are not prime numbers.

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5  
Probably irrelevant to your problem, but those two break statements seem superfluous. –  BoltClock Oct 27 '10 at 18:58
    
This is pretty simple to debug, why not use the debugger? –  alternative Oct 27 '10 at 19:16
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9 Answers 9

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This works. You can see the output here.

public class Main {

public static void main(String[] args) {
for(int input = 11; input <= 99; input += 2){
    boolean found = false;
    for(int x = 2; x < (int)Math.sqrt(input) + 1; x++){
        if(input%x == 0){
            found = true;
            break;
        }

    }
    if(!found) {
            System.out.println(input);
    }
}
}
}
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Your test for primeness is incorrect. You stop testing a number (input) as soon as you find a divisor which the input is not divisible by.

That's not the definition of prime - you need to test that the input number is not divisible by any divisors less than it - in other words you need to test all values of x before you can declare a number as prime.

You can break out of the loop that checks input % x != 0 when an input is divisible by x, but not when it is not divisible - you need to keep on checking when this condition is true!

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1  
"you need to test that the input number is not divisible by any divisors less than it" is not correct, you don't need to test every other numbers, just every other prime numbers below it –  Yanick Rochon Oct 27 '10 at 19:07
2  
You can save even more work by only test up to sqrt of your number as anything over that needs a smaled divisor or end up higher than you number :) –  David Mårtensson Oct 27 '10 at 19:19
    
Well yes there are certain optimizations one can take - I was really just trying to explain the correct definition of prime-ness. –  matt b Oct 27 '10 at 20:21
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I always love questions where the shortest and most obvious answer is to just hardcode the output:

System.out.println("11\n13\n17\n19\n23\n29\n31\n37\n41\n43" +
   "\n47\n53\n59\n61\n67\n71\n73\n79\n83\n89\n97");
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Also the most performant! –  Mark Peters Oct 27 '10 at 19:17
    
good thinking :) –  sdadffdfd Oct 27 '10 at 19:17
1  
Downvoted. This is homework, the OP needs to master the loops. Proposed solution solves the problem but misses the larger point. –  Seva Alekseyev Oct 27 '10 at 19:20
1  
@Seva: Lighten up. There were already 6 good answers posted helping the OP with his homework when I posted this. I was just trying to make a statement about how it's easy to overengineer for a certain set of requirements. By the way, just because some SO member calls it homework and then tags it as such without confirmation from the OP, doesn't mean it is or should be treated as such. –  Mark Peters Oct 27 '10 at 19:27
1  
Indeed, this is the best solution for the OP's specific problem. If the problem had been to print out prime numbers until an out of memory error, well, that'd be different. "Don't be more complicated or wasteful than you need to be" is a very important lesson, too. –  Pops Oct 27 '10 at 19:40
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Wikipedia gives a good algorithm for finding prime numbers. It also lists those up to 100.

If you are looking for debugging help, I would simply step through your code until you see which of your tests are not correct. This is a quick simple program and shouldn't take you long.

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The problem is in this block:

if(input%x != 0)
{
System.out.println(input);
break;
}

It will print 'input' if it is not divisible by current value of 'x', but it may be divisible by next values of 'x'. In that case 'input' is not prime, but it is printed.

Correct code:

boolean flag;
for(int input = 11; input <= 99; input += 2)
{
        flag = true;
        for(int x = 2; x < (int)Math.sqrt(input) + 1; x++)
        {
            if(input%x == 0)
            {
                flag = false;
                break;
            }
        }
        if(flag == true)
            System.out.println(input);
}
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tried it, but it prints non prime numbers like 15,49,... –  artworkad シ Oct 27 '10 at 19:19
    
@ArtWorkAD: Its giving correct result. No non-prime numbers are printed. Please check it once again. –  nullpointerexception Oct 27 '10 at 19:24
    
thanks, it works now! –  artworkad シ Oct 27 '10 at 19:26
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To find a prime, you don't need to test every numbers below it up to it's square root; you simply need to test every other prime below it. Here's a demo :

ArrayList<Integer> primes = new ArrayList<Integer>(); // hold every other prime numbers that we find
boolean isPrime;

// add first base prime number
primes.add(2);

for (int x = 3; x < max; x+=2) {  // start from 3 and skip multiples of 2
    isPrime = true;  // prove it's not prime
    for (Integer i : primes) {
        if (x % i == 0) {
            isPrime = false; // x is divisible by a prime number... 
            break; // exit loop, we proved it's not a prime
        }
    }
    if (isPrime) {
        if (x >= 10) {
            System.out.println(x);  // print only two digits prime numbers
        }
        primes.add(x);  // add x to our prime our number list for future checks
    }
}

** EDIT **

A yet more flexible and reusable implementation in a static method (not optimized for listing large prime numbers) :

public static List<Integer> findPrimes(int min, int max) {
    LinkedList<Integer> primes = new LinkedList<Integer>();
    boolean isPrime;
    double square;

    // add first base prime number
    primes.add(2);

    for (int x = 3; x < max; x+=2) {  // start from 3 and skip multiples of 2

        isPrime = true;  // prove it's not prime
        square = Math.sqrt(x);
        for (Integer i : primes) {
            isPrime = x % i != 0;  // x is not prime if it is divisible by i
            if (!isPrime || i > square) { 
                break;
            }
        }
        if (isPrime) {
            primes.add(x);  // add x to our prime numbers
        }
    }

    // remove all numbers below min
    while (!primes.isEmpty() && primes.getFirst() < min) {
        primes.removeFirst();
    }

    return primes;
}

Method usage :

List<Integer> primes = findPrimes(10, 100);
System.out.println("Listing " + primes.size() + " prime numbers");
for (Integer prime : primes) {
    System.out.println(prime);
}
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You are printing all the odd numbers. You always break out of the loop so x never exceeds 2.

if(input%x != 0){
    System.out.println(input);
    break;  // <<-- break here
}else{
    break;  // <<-- and break here
}

Also think carefully about the definition of a prime number:

  • If any of the numbers you test is an exact divisor the number is not prime.
  • If all of the numbers you test are not exact divisors then the number is prime.

You should only break out of the loop if you found a divisor. If you haven't found one yet you need to keep going until you have tested all the possibilities. And you shouldn't print anything until you've finished the loop and know the result.

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for(int input = 11; input <= 99; input += 2){
    int found = 0;
    for(int x = 2; x < (int)Math.sqrt(input) + 1; x++)
        if(input%x == 0){
            found = 1;
            break;
        }
    if(found == 0)
        System.out.println(input);

}

this should do the work

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-1 This doesn't even compile. You can't use an int as a conditional. Even it did compile it wouldn't print the desired output. –  mR_fr0g Oct 27 '10 at 19:06
    
are you sure it doesn't print the desired output ? I think your solution prints the same thing.... :/ –  sdadffdfd Oct 27 '10 at 19:16
    
You have edited your answer since my comment. It now works –  mR_fr0g Oct 27 '10 at 19:19
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Yes because it is printing out all cases where a non-factor is found. You need to ONLY print out cases where no factors can be found.

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