Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to set up auto discovery using UDP multicasting, and am using some sample code from the internet. this seems to work ok when I run the client and the server on the same machine, but when I run them on different machines, either with a machine running in a VM on my machine (virtualBox) or on other 'real' machines on the network then the other machines never seem to receive the messages being broadcast.

After some googling it seems the likely culprit would be the router (SpeedTouch 780) which might be dropping the packets. How can I check if this is the case? Are their other things which I can check to try and track down the problem? Might it be something else entirely?

teh codez:

server code

using System;
using System.Net.Sockets;
using System.Text;

internal class StockPriceMulticaster
    {
    private static string[] symbols = {"ABCD", "EFGH", "IJKL", "MNOP"};

    public static void Main ()
        {
        using (UdpClient publisher = new UdpClient ("230.0.0.1", 8899))
            {
            Console.WriteLine ("Publishing stock prices to 230.0.0.1:8899");
            Random gen = new Random ();
            while (true)
                {
                int i = gen.Next (0, symbols.Length);
                double price = 400*gen.NextDouble () + 100;
                string msg = String.Format ("{0} {1:#.00}", symbols, price);
                byte[] sdata = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes (msg);
                publisher.Send (sdata, sdata.Length);
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep (5000);
                }
            }
        }
    }

and the client:

using System;
using System.Net;
using System.Net.Sockets;
using System.Text;
class StockPriceReceiver{
    public static void Main(){
        UdpClient subscriber = new UdpClient(8899);
        IPAddress addr = IPAddress.Parse("230.0.0.1");
        subscriber.JoinMulticastGroup(addr);
        IPEndPoint ep = null;
        for(int i=0; i<10;i++){
            byte[] pdata = subscriber.Receive(ref ep);
            string price = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(pdata);
            Console.WriteLine(price);
        }
        subscriber.DropMulticastGroup(addr);
    }
}

EDIT

So it seems that it is publishing the UDP packets on the VirtualBox host only network interface for some reason rather than the wireless network that all the machines are connected to. Just need to figure out how to make it not do that... So added the resolution in an answer instead...

share|improve this question
    
Could it be IPv4 vs. IPv6 on your network? –  Jared Updike Oct 27 '10 at 23:42
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

So the issue turned out to be that as I had more than 1 active network connection it was choosing one and using that and that was causing the UDP packets to be sent out on a different network connection that the client was listening on. As i had installed Virtual box it had installed and activated the VirtualBox Host-only network adapter, so that host only network connections could be supported. When I switched VirtualBox over to host only mode the packets started to be received. Disabling the VirtualBox adapter and switching back to a bridged connection also worked.

share|improve this answer
    
The OS chooses a default interface to send packets from if you don't specify. For unicast packets, the interface will be chosen using routing metrics (ie it will try to choose the interface which is "closest" to the destination). For multicast, there may be a way to configure which interface is default, but generally your program should determine for itself (or by user configuration) which interface to use, and specify this through an appropriate API (I don't program in C# so I can't be more specific) –  tialaramex Nov 28 '11 at 15:11
    
I have spent a TON of time on this, specifically using a VirtualBox to test receiving multicast packets. I followed your comment and disabled the VirtualBox network adapter on my HOST computer - once i did that the client software started receiving the UDP packets. –  ajhuddy Jun 12 at 5:59
add comment

I'd try Wireshark.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah I'd started the installation of that already. I was hoping for some other options as well. oh well we'll see I suppose... –  Sam Holder Oct 27 '10 at 19:44
    
This identified the issue, data going to the wrong network interface. –  Sam Holder Oct 27 '10 at 23:06
add comment

There are a few issues to look into here.

The first is: are you sure multicast is the best way of doing this? I think broadcast would serve you better.

The other is: routers generally don't forward multicast or broadcast, switches and hubs do.

Take a look at the following two questions: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2046275/why-are-udp-multicast-packets-not-being-recieved and http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3068497/udp-multicast-over-the-internet

EDIT:

When you create your UdpClient you can specify which local endpoint you will be sending from. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/k227d11f.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
issue was data going to the wrong interface. not sure how I can make it go to the right one though... –  Sam Holder Oct 27 '10 at 23:07
1  
I have edited my answer to include something about this. –  Guge Oct 28 '10 at 6:00
add comment

In your code, you do not setup the TTL for your call to UdpClient. So if the default TTL is 1, then your packets won't get past the first router.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you have multiple interfaces, the right answer is to listen to all of them, and not try to pick one if you do not have a definition of what is right.

Here's how I implemented a UDP discovery service. It broke, originally, because my Virtual Box interfaces got in the way and swallowed up the UDP broadcasts on a random IP subnet (192.168.56.x) instead of my actual ethernet connection (192.168.0.x). So I improved it, based on the answer from Guge. It's a little verbose and I probably didn't code it in the most neat way, but it works now. I broadcast on all interfaces, then receive the data (round-robin) on all interfaces until the timeout, or single response (if justFindOne = true).

For some reason, IPv6 interfaces crash the UDP part, so I just filter out IPv4 addresses. Please correct me if there is a way for this to work on both.

    const int iPort = 7611;
    const int IP_TIMEOUT = 1000;

    private static List<DiscoveryServer> FindIPAddresses(string filter, bool justFindOne)
    {
        List<DiscoveryServer> ipNames = new List<DiscoveryServer>();

        byte[] message = new byte[2] { 17, 2 };
        string hostname = Dns.GetHostName();
        IPHostEntry entry = Dns.GetHostEntry(hostname);
        List<UdpClient> clients = new List<UdpClient>();

        try
        {
            // send out UDP packets on all IPv4 interfaces.

            foreach (var ipAddress in entry.AddressList)
            {
                if (ipAddress.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork)
                {
                    IPEndPoint ipLocalEndPoint = new IPEndPoint(ipAddress, iPort);

                    UdpClient udpC = new UdpClient(ipLocalEndPoint);
                    clients.Add(udpC);
                    udpC.EnableBroadcast = true;
                    udpC.Client.ReceiveTimeout = IP_TIMEOUT;
                    int response1 = udpC.Send(message, 2, new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Broadcast, iPort));
                }
            }

            if (clients.Count == 0)
            {
                throw new Exception("There are no IPv4 network interfaces available");
            }

            System.DateTime startTime = System.DateTime.Now;
            double timeout = IP_TIMEOUT / 1000;

            IPEndPoint remEP = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Broadcast, iPort);

            while (System.DateTime.Now.Subtract(startTime) < TimeSpan.FromSeconds(timeout) &&
                !(justFindOne && ipNames.Count() > 0))
            {
                foreach (var udpC in clients)
                {
                    if (udpC.Available > 0)
                    {
                        byte[] response = udpC.Receive(ref remEP);
                        string name;
                        if (response.Length > 2)
                        {
                            name = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(response, 3, response[2]);
                            if (filter == "" || name.Contains(filter))
                            {
                                DiscoveryServer ds = new DiscoveryServer(name, remEP.Address);
                                ipNames.Add(ds);
                                if (justFindOne) break;
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            foreach (var udpC in clients)
            {
                udpC.Close();
            }
        }
        return ipNames;

    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.