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Is there any other way to get List<foo> directly from ValueCollection.

Current I am using below code

 Dictionary<string,List<foo>> dic;

 List<foo> list= new List<foo>();

 foreach (List<foo> var in dic.Values)
 {               
      list.AddRange(var);
 }  

OR

List<List<foo>> list= new List<List<foo>>(dic.Values);

Above conversion gives me List<List<foo> but I want List<foo> from dic.values without using for each loop if possible using .NET 2.0.

share|improve this question
1  
Why don't you want to use a foreach loop? – kevingessner Oct 27 '10 at 21:36
1  
Without Linq (.NET 3.5), you're going to need a for or foreach loop somewhere. – Greg Oct 27 '10 at 21:40
    
Depending on your requirements, you may be able to link to .NET 3.0/3.5, yet still compile on an older version of visual studio. The syntax wouldn't look as sexy, because you would have to access extension methods via static syntax, but it would at least be an alternative. – Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 27 '10 at 21:42
    
@Greg, it is possible to do without a for or foreach loop by implementing your own class for it. – tster Oct 27 '10 at 21:44
    
@tster - Then the loop is in a custom class or a custom method. As I said, you will still have to write a loop somewhere - unless you use recursion or some other acrobatic feat to avoid it. Just use a foreach loop in-place or in a utility/extension method and be done with it. – Greg Oct 28 '10 at 3:22

Without using LINQ or .NET 3.5, I don't know of any way to do this without some kind of for loop. Even with LINQ, somewhere in the framework a foreach would be doing the same thing.

If you're chained to .NET 2.0 but have access to a later C# compiler version, you can use LinqBridge.dll to achieve the same effects - read about it here. Note that this would require at least VS 2008 (targeting the 2.0 framework). If you can use that, then all you'd have to do is

using System.Linq;

...

dic.Values.SelectMany(v => v).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
LINQ would at least push the foreach out to iteration time instead of creation time. – tster Oct 27 '10 at 21:51
    
True - and I suspect that the real win is that OP wouldn't have to write it themselves! With LinqBridge, it would be possible with the 2.0 Framework, too. – Ben Oct 27 '10 at 22:14

EDIT: the easy LINQ solution (not available in .NET 2.0)

dic.Values.SelectMany(list => list).ToList()

If you don't need a List and are OK with an IEnumerable then leave off the ToList()

The harder solution:

  1. Define a class which implements IList and which has a constructor which takes a ValueCollection or ICollection
  2. Implement all the methods on that. you can keep track of all the list of T's and the index of the current list you are working on.

use

return new MyListCombiner<foo>(dict.Values);
share|improve this answer
    
The OP specifically mentions .NET 2.0. – Ani Oct 27 '10 at 21:37
    
OP said "if possible". – Don Kirkby Oct 27 '10 at 21:38
1  
@Don Kirby: Title says C# 2.0. Never mind, I don't mean to nitpick. – Ani Oct 27 '10 at 21:41
    
@Don Kirkby, I read "if possible" as referring to the use of a foreach loop, but it isn't completely clear. – Jeff Ogata Oct 27 '10 at 21:45
    
I think you're right, @adrift, I probably misinterpreted that. – Don Kirkby Oct 27 '10 at 23:59

Your foreach loop should be

Dictionary<string,List<foo>> dic;

 List<foo> list= new List<foo>();

 foreach (List<foo> var in dic.Values)
 {    
      foreach(foo bar in var){           
          list.AddRange(bar);
      }
 }  

You were adding each list to a list, when you wanted to be adding each item of each list to a list.

And totally missed the for each loop part in your question.

I don't think that's possible in C# 2.0. LINQ is at heart just doing iterations over an IEnumerable which is all the foreach is doing

share|improve this answer
    
According to this reference msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/z883w3dc.aspx AddRange adds elements of a collection passed to it as IEnumerable<T>, to the list, so the OP's code is correct – Maciej Hehl Oct 27 '10 at 21:53
    
@Maciej Hehl this is true, now I want to play with this to see why it isn't doing what it should be. – msarchet Oct 27 '10 at 21:55

Ultimately, any method you choose is going to involve a for-loop at some level of abstraction. If you're staying in pure .NET 2.0, you'll have to write that for loop somewhere in your code. This sort of data conglomeration is one of the main purposes of LINQ. See the SelectMany method:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.linq.enumerable.selectmany.aspx

Depending on your requirements, you may be able to link to .NET 3.0/3.5, yet still compile on an older version of the toolset. You'd still have to have 3.0/3.5 on the box you are running the application on, but wouldn't have to upgrade your tools. The syntax also wouldn't look as sexy, because you would have to access extension methods via static method syntax.

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In C# 2.0 you must use either a loop, or Poor Man's LINQ, with code that looks like this:

Linq(dic.Values).SelectMany(delegate(List<foo> list) { return list; }).ToList()

Where you define Linq() as

static PoorMansLinq<T> Linq<T>(IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    return new PoorMansLinq<T>(source);
}

I noticed that the first line doesn't currently work and I submitted an update to fix it. In the meantime, you can use the following as a workaround:

Linq(Linq(dic.Values).SelectMany(delegate(List<foo> list) { return list; })).ToList()

You could also use LinqBridge, and call Enumerable directly, but this is cumbersome without C# 3.0.

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