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Please forgive the bad title - I had a hard time trying to think of a concise way to explain this.

I have a Python class that will have some underlying objects of other classes. I want to be able to create these underlying objects via a method of the original object. Let me try to explain better with an example:

class Foo:
    def __init__(self):
        self.bars = []

    def Bar(self, a, b, c):
        self.bars.append(Bar(a, b, c))

class Bar:
    def __init__(self, a, b, c):
        self.a = a
        self.b = b
        self.c = c

I would use the above as such:

f = Foo()
f.Bar(1, 2, 3)

So this works how I want but is kind of crappy with respect to maintenance. Is there a nice "Pythonic" way to do this that would make maintaining this easy? For instance, let's say I changed the constructor of Bar to:

__init__(self, a, b, c, d):

would there be a way to define all of this so I don't have to update the argument list in 3 places?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Sure, no problem: Just pass *args and **kwargs on to Bar:

class Foo:
    def __init__(self):
        self.bars = []

    def append_bar(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.bars.append(Bar(*args, **kwargs))

class Bar:
    def __init__(self, a, b, c, d):
        self.a = a
        self.b = b
        self.c = c
        self.d = d

f=Foo()
f.append_bar(1,2,3,4)

PS. I changed the name of the method to append_bar because the usual convention in Python is to use lowercase names for methods, and I think methods whose names are verbs help describe what the method does.

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This works great! Thank you! –  brady Oct 27 '10 at 22:48

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