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In any iphone template UIViewController class you will see this:

- (void)viewDidUnload {

    // Release any retained subviews of the main view.
    // e.g. self.myOutlet = nil;
}

But if I set self.myOutlet = nil in viewDidUnload, and I also have [self.myOutlet release] in the dealloc method, isn't that over-releasing self.myOutlet, since setting it to nil will already set its retain count to zero?

If I don't release it in dealloc(), Leaks reports a memory leak because it never sees self.myOutlet getting released, assuming I have something like this in the header file:

@property (nonatomic, retain) UIView *myOutlet;
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you set self.myOutlet to nil in viewDidUnload, the call in dealloc to [myOutlet release] will simply send a release message to nil. It's perfectly acceptable to send messages to nil. Nothing bad will happen and you won't over-release anything.

The thing to watch out for is releasing the object referenced by myOutlet in viewDidUnload without setting myOutlet to nil. In this case, you'll get a crash in dealloc. Why? Because myOutlet will still be referring to the memory location once occupied by the myOutlet object, and your dealloc method will try to send whatever is currently at that memory location a release message.

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Thanks guys. That's what I was hoping to hear. –  sol Oct 28 '10 at 0:16
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-(void)viewDidUnload is called when a memory warning is issued, -(void)dealloc is called in the complete destruction of a view (these aren't the same). Therefore, you should be doing both

- (void)viewDidUnload {

    // Release any retained subviews of the main view.
    self.myOutlet = nil;
} 
- (void)dealloc {
    [self.myOutlet release];
}

Edit: What James said furthers the point.

Cheers!

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It's not the variable that has a retain count; it's the object. When you do self.something = nil, it does indeed release the object — and it sets the variable to point to nil. So any further release messages sent to self.something do not go to the original object. Instead, they go to the new value, nil, which happily ignores anything you tell it.

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