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My database driver for PostgreSQL 8/9 does not return a count of records affected when executing INSERT or UPDATE.

PostgreSQL offers the non-standard syntax "RETURNING" which seems like a good workaround. But what might be the syntax? The example returns the ID of a record, but I need a count.

INSERT INTO distributors (did, dname) VALUES (DEFAULT, 'XYZ Widgets') RETURNING did;

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I know it doesn't sound helpful but you have to find better drivers or update for your current ones (the solution OMG Ponies have posted works only in PL/pgSQL code). – Milen A. Radev Oct 28 '10 at 6:42

I know this question is oooolllllld and my solution is arguably overly complex, but that's my favorite kind of solution!

Anyway, I had to do the same thing and got it working like this:

-- Get count from INSERT
WITH rows AS (
    INSERT INTO distributors
        (did, dname)
    VALUES
        (DEFAULT, 'XYZ Widgets'),
        (DEFAULT, 'ABC Widgets')
    RETURNING 1
)
SELECT count(*) FROM rows;

-- Get count from UPDATE
WITH rows AS (
    UPDATE distributors
    SET dname = 'JKL Widgets'
    WHERE did <= 10
    RETURNING 1
)
SELECT count(*) FROM rows;

One of these days I really have to get around to writing a love sonnet to PostgreSQL's WITH clause ...

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I agree w/ Milen, your driver should do this for you. What driver are you using and for what language? But if you are using plpgsql, you can use GET DIAGNOSTICS my_var = ROW_COUNT;

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/current/static/plpgsql-statements.html

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It's not clear from your question how you're calling the statement. Assuming you're using something like JDBC you may be calling it as a query rather than an update. From JDBC's executeQuery:

Executes the given SQL statement, which returns a single ResultSet object.

This is therefore appropriate when you execute a statement that returns some query results, such as SELECT or INSERT ... RETURNING. If you are making an update to the database and then want to know how many tuples were affected, you need to use executeUpdate which returns:

either (1) the row count for SQL Data Manipulation Language (DML) statements or (2) 0 for SQL statements that return nothing

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