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I have some code (which works fine) that looks something like this:

        int integer = 42;
        decimal? castTo = integer;

Then I wanted to do something similar with reflection, with some code that looks like this:

object value = source; // source was an int originally
var parameters = new object[1];    
    ...
    parameters[0] = value;
    var setMethod = property.GetSetMethod();     
    // Call the set method, which takes a decimal? as a parameter
    setMethod.Invoke(o, parameters);  

When I do this, I get:

failed: System.ArgumentException : Object of type 'System.Int32' cannot be converted to type 'System.Nullable`1[System.Decimal]'.
    at System.RuntimeType.CheckValue(Object value, Binder binder, CultureInfo culture, BindingFlags invokeAttr)
    at System.Reflection.MethodBase.CheckArguments(Object[] parameters, Binder binder, BindingFlags invokeAttr, CultureInfo culture, Signature sig)
    at System.Reflection.RuntimeMethodInfo.Invoke(Object obj, BindingFlags invokeAttr, Binder binder, Object[] parameters, CultureInfo culture, Boolean skipVisibilityChecks)
    at System.Reflection.RuntimeMethodInfo.Invoke(Object obj, BindingFlags invokeAttr, Binder binder, Object[] parameters, CultureInfo culture)
    at System.Reflection.MethodBase.Invoke(Object obj, Object[] parameters)

Why would an implicit type conversion that works fine elsewhere fail with reflection? Is there a trick to using reflection to perform this conversion?


Edit: Thanks all for the responses. Here is the solution I came up with, based on the answers:

    private object Convert(object source, Type destinationType)
    {
        if (source == null)
        {
            return null;
        }

        var sourceType = source.GetType();

        // unwrap nullable types
        var nullableType = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(destinationType);
        if(nullableType != null)
        {
            destinationType = nullableType;
        }

        nullableType = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(sourceType);
        if(nullableType != null)
        {
            sourceType = nullableType;
        }


        var implicitCastMethod =
            destinationType.GetMethod("op_Implicit", 
                                 new[] { sourceType } );

        if(implicitCastMethod == null)
        {
            return null;
        }

        return implicitCastMethod.Invoke(null, new[] { source });
    }

Edit #2: I wish someone had mentioned System.Convert.ChangeType(), which handles these cases, and more. It turns out that op_Implicit can only convert to less restrictive numeric types. (of course, hence the "Implicit" in the name). In other words, the first solution worked for intdecimal? but not decimal?int. (It seems that I would need to change this code to also try op_Explicit if the implicit cast failed, if I wanted to be able to handle a conversion from decimal? back to int.)

Since System.Convert.ChangeType() doesn't work with Nullable<> types, I finally ended up using some code similar to what I found here (slightly modified):

    private static object Convert(object source, Type destinationType)
    {
        if(destinationType == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("destinationType");
        }

        if(destinationType.IsGenericType && 
            destinationType.GetGenericTypeDefinition().Equals(typeof(Nullable<>)))
        {
            if (source == null)
            {
                return null;
            }
            destinationType = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(destinationType);                
        }

        return System.Convert.ChangeType(source, destinationType);


    }
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You will have to do the conversion yourself, as the compiler handles the cast in a non-reflection environment. As reflection code basically is evaluating types and objects like the compiler does, you will have to look for a method named op_implicit with the needed parameters (in your case Int32) on your object and invoke it. After that, you can invoke the property accessor. A possible way would be the following:

//search for an implicit cast operator on the target type
MethodInfo[] methods = targetType.GetMethods();
foreach(MethodInfo method = source.GetType().GetMethod("op_Implicit"))
{
  if (method.Name == "op_Implicit")
  {
    ParameterInfo[] parameters = method.GetParameters();
    if (parameters.Length == 1 && parameters[0].ParameterType == value.GetType())
    {
      value = method.Invoke(obj,new object[]{value});
      break;
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is essentially what worked for me. At least it got me on the right track. Thanks! –  Mike Oct 28 '10 at 8:10
    
MethodInfo method = source.GetType().GetMethod("op_Implicit"); is easier to read than the explicitly looped search. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 28 '10 at 8:56
    
@Merlyn, yeah, you'll notice that's what I did if you read my first edit, except I also added the type into the GetMethod() call as well. Otherwise if there were multiple overloaded op_Implicit methods, I think I'd still have to loop? –  Mike Oct 28 '10 at 9:05
    
@Mike: Oops - you're right. I guess your other option would be to use LINQ, if you prefer it. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 28 '10 at 9:25

The runtime doesn't know about implicit conversions.

You can call op_Implicit or another conversion method through reflection, but that way you'll only get the specific conversion semantics that you implement. If you're using C# 4.0, I'd recommend using the "dynamic" type here, since it will implement the C# conversion semantics automatically.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for C# 4.0 dynamic recommendation –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 28 '10 at 1:02
    
Thanks for this. We are using C# 3.5, but I keep seeing C# 4.0 features like this that look handy. –  Mike Oct 28 '10 at 8:10

Why would an implicit type conversion that works fine elsewhere fail with reflection?

Because there is no conversion there. Implicit conversion doesn't mean that it happens automatically, when you use it in code the compiler adds the code for it.

If you want to use it in reflection, you have to do the same, i.e. find the static method that does the conversion from one type to the other, and call it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation. I guess I was hoping that reflection would have an easier way to do that, but alas. –  Mike Oct 28 '10 at 8:11

Other answers have already covered why the implicit conversion isn't working. If you need your conversion to be implicit, then use one of the other answers. In case you don't actually need the conversion to be implicit, here is a simpler option:

class Test
{
  public decimal? Val { get; set; }
}

class Program
{
  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
    object o = new Test();
    object source = 5;
    var setMethod = typeof(Test).GetProperty("Val").GetSetMethod();
    // Just do the cast explicitly
    setMethod.Invoke(o, new object[] { (decimal?)(int)source });
  }
}

Note that if you're missing the (decimal?) cast, you get the error that the original question quoted. If you're missing the (int) cast, you get this error:

Unhandled Exception: System.InvalidCastException: Specified cast is not valid.
   at Program.Main(String[] args) in ...\ConsoleApplication1\Program.cs:line 14
share|improve this answer
    
Novel idea; it made me chuckle at least. I guess I should have said this in the question, but the real objective was to make this dynamic; I am not always doing (decimal?)(int). =) –  Mike Oct 28 '10 at 8:09
    
@Mike: I figured as much, but you can't gauge experience w/ a single question over the internet. It wouldn't be 100% obvious to a newbie that you have to cast twice to get this to work. I will leave this answer, in case it is useful to someone less skilled, who still encounters the same error. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 28 '10 at 8:40

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