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Here's a bit of Scala code to sum the values from 1 to 9 which are divisible by 3 or 5. Why does line 5 return a Unit and not a Boolean type?

object Sample {

    def main(args : Array[String]) {
        val answer = (1 until 10).foldLeft(0) ((result, current) => {
            if ((current % 3 == 0) || (current % 5 == 0)) {
                result + current
            }
        })

        println(answer)
    }

}
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might wanna tag this project-euler-spoiler ... –  Kim Stebel Oct 28 '10 at 4:25
    
Sorry, I didn't mean to spoil. Wasn't really thinking about that when I posted. I would edit it out, but I can't edit other's answers. –  Mike Oct 28 '10 at 10:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The if expression has a type of Unit because there is no else clause. Thus sometimes it returns nothing (Unit) so the entire expression has type Unit.

(I assume you meant to ask why it didn't return Int, not Boolean)

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You're correct. I didn't realize what was actually going on - I'm really new to functional programming. What's the best way to handle this? Adding an else with result + 0? –  Mike Oct 28 '10 at 0:18
    
move the result + portion out of the if block (there's no need to repeat it), and make it result + if (...) current else 0 –  pelotom Oct 28 '10 at 0:24
    
Thanks a bunch. :) –  Mike Oct 28 '10 at 0:26

Can we ever be too idiomatic? YES WE CAN!

Set(3,5).map(k => Set(0 until n by k:_*)).flatten.sum

[Edit]

Daniel's suggestion looks better:

Set(3,5).flatMap(k => 0 until n by k).sum
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2  
Wouldn't it be better to just use flatMap? –  Daniel C. Sobral Oct 28 '10 at 11:01
4  
In fact, if you do so, you can even shorten it to Set(3,5).flatMap(k => 0 until n by k).sum. –  Daniel C. Sobral Oct 28 '10 at 11:03
    
Nice one. Very... err.. arithmetic :) –  pedrofurla Oct 28 '10 at 12:54

Here is my solution:

scala> val answer = (1 until 10) filter( current => (current % 3 == 0) || (current % 5 == 0)) sum
answer: Int = 23

Notice the filter instead of if's.

Another one in a even more idiomatic Scala:

( for( x <- 1 until 10 if x % 3 == 0 || x % 5 == 0 ) yield x ) sum
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1  
+1 Another great answer. Thanks for helping me learn a few different ways. –  Mike Oct 28 '10 at 0:43

The closest working code to what you did is this:

object Euler {
    def main(args : Array[String]) {
        val answer = (1 until 10).foldLeft(0) ((result, current) =>
            if ((current % 3 == 0) || (current % 5 == 0))
                result + current
            else
                result
        )

        println(answer)
    }
}
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