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I have the following code, but I'm getting incorrect output. Can anybody tell me why output is 10 B only and why I'm not getting A in output??

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
void main()
{
    int *p;
    char c,d;
    int i;

    clrscr();
    p=&i;
    *p=10;
    (char *)p=&c;
    *p=65;
    (char *)p=&d;
    *p=66;
    printf("%d%c%c",i,c,d);
    getch();
}
share|improve this question
    
is getch() to wait for user input before Windows closes the Command Prompt? –  動靜能量 Oct 28 '10 at 5:38
    
This is a platform-specific question, so should provide that info (OS, compiler, etc.) –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 28 '10 at 5:40

6 Answers 6

Your program invokes undefined behavior, so there's no correct or incorrect. Specifically:

*p = 65;

writes an integer into memory with only room for a char. C99 §6.5.3.2/4 (Address and indirection operations) states:

If the operand has type ‘‘pointer to type’’, the result has type ‘‘type’’. If an invalid value has been assigned to the pointer, the behavior of the unary * operator is undefined.84)

p has type pointer to int, so *p has type int. However, p is not a the address of a valid int object.

Also, I believe the cast on the left side of the assignment is illegal (GCC definitely thinks so).

I believe what's happening is that it's laid out (increasing addressess) like:

|i|i|i|i|d|c|p|p|p|p|

This represents the bytes each occupies. I'll walk through what I think is happening:

p = &i;

|i|i|i|i|d|c|00|00|00|00|

For simplicity, I assume the address of i is 0.

*p=10;

|10|0|0|0|d|c|00|00|00|00|

p=&c;

|10|0|0|0|d|c|05|00|00|00|

*p=65;

|i|i|i|i|d|65|00|00|00|00|

Note that modifying *p overwrites p.

p=&d;

|10|0|0|0|d|65|04|00|00|00|

*p=66;

|10|0|0|0|66|00|00|00|00|00|

So storing to d overwrites c with NULL. The above applies if your machine is little-endian, has 4-byte ints, and the stack grows upwards (towards lower addresses). The analysis is different if you have 2-byte ints, but the main conclusion still applies.

Returning void is also illegal, but that's unrelated.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that the assignment of the int's here can be the problem. They are all in the guaranteed range of char, no? As long as the value of such an assignment fits there is no undefined behavior. BTW, things as 'a' or '\n' are int, too. –  Jens Gustedt Oct 28 '10 at 7:09
    
@Jens, no, the range doesn't matter. Storing an int (i.e. having an int on the left side of =) is still going to write sizeof(int) bytes. I am aware that character constants like 'a' are ints. –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 28 '10 at 7:13
    
ah, sorry I probably misread, then. –  Jens Gustedt Oct 28 '10 at 7:36

I could not compile your program, it does not conform to ANSI standard. Here is fixed version and it prints "10AB":

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{

int *p;
char *cp;
char c,d;
int i;
p=&i;
*p=10;
cp=&c;
*cp=65;
cp=&d;
*cp=66;
printf("%d%c%c\n",i,c,d);
}
share|improve this answer

You are using the casting operator in wrong way. You an assiging an char * to int *. So you should cast that char * to allow the conversion. The correct code is as below:

int *p; char c,d; int i; 
p=&i; 
*p=10; 
p=(int *)&c; 
*p=65; 
p=(int *)&d; 
*p=66; 
printf("%d%c%c",i,c,d); 
share|improve this answer
    
This code still invokes undefined behavior by storing an int where only a char will fit. –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 28 '10 at 6:01

The statement (char *)p=&c; doesn't magically turn p into a char * from that point on. In the next line, *p=65;, you're still putting an int into that location.

Ditto for (char *)p=&d; *p=66;. Now because you're inserting what's almost certainly two bytes into the single byte d, you're probably overwriting c with 0.

You may find that changing *p = 66 to *((char*)p) = 66 will give you what you want, the insertion of a single byte.

And, please, upgrade to gcc if possible. It costs exactly the same as Turbo C and is better in just about every way.

share|improve this answer

You want to use

p = (int *) &c;

but when you do

*p = 65

then the compiled program will put 65, as a 4-byte value (assuming your int is 4 byte) into the memory where c is residing. It will trash 3 more bytes... because c is only 1 byte, and you are putting 4 bytes of data into it... and I wonder whether some platform will complain as c is a char, and may not be at an int boundary...

You probably want to use

char *pChar = &c;
*pChar = 65;

If you want to experiment with putting a byte 65 into the integer i, you can use

pChar = (char *) &i;
*pChar = 65;

The (char *) is called casting -- making it a pointer to character.

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Your main problem is that the whole thing is a hack. Don't do that. There is no reason to cast int or char back and forth like that. You can only expect trouble from the way you write your code.

Some hints:

  • the correct include file for standard C is stdio.h
  • in C the expression (char*)p is not an lvalue, meaning that you can't assign to it. (this has good reasons)
  • Even if you would succeed to assign the address of a char to an int pointer this would generally a bad idea. Not only because you will eventually override memory that is not "yours" but also because of alignment problems. The best that can happen to you in such a case is a bus error, to tell you early that you are on the wrong track
  • the return type of main is int
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