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I need to implement thread.start() method in my java code. Please let me know through an example of overriding of thread.start() method and how it works?

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2  
Why do you believe you need to override it? –  Jon Skeet Oct 28 '10 at 6:42
    
Please tell us why you cant implement your logic in run(). –  Guillaume Oct 28 '10 at 6:56
    
I have two run() methods.I need to decide which run() method should be called from the specific start() method. –  Anand Oct 28 '10 at 7:02
    
one run() method is in base class and second one is in derived class. –  Anand Oct 28 '10 at 7:03
    
In your comment, you say you have two run methods? One in a subclass? Won't it figure out which to call at runtime? Might be useful to show the (example) code... –  Toby Oct 28 '10 at 7:26

8 Answers 8

You should not. Override run instead

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As others said, overriding Thread.start() is not the way to do it. Usually, I wouldn't override Thread.run() either, but use a Runnable.

If you have to decide which method to run after the thread has been spawned, you could do something like this:

final Runnable runnableA = ...;
final Runnable runnableB = ...;

Runnable r = new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        if (...) {
            runnableA.run();
        } else {
            runnableB.run();
        }
    }
}

Thread thread = new Thread(r);
thread.start();

If, as you say, you have a superclass and a subclass where the run() method is overidden, you can just rely on late binding and the proper method will be invoked automatically:

Runnable couldBeAOrB = ...;
Thread thread = new Thread(couldBeAOrB);
thread.start();
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You can override start as any other method

    Thread myThread = new Thread() {

        @Override
        public void start() {
            // do something in the actual (old) thread
            super.start();
        }

        @Override
        public void run() {
            // do something in a new thread if 'called' by super.start()
        }
    };

but you must call super.start() to create a new thread and have run() called in that new thread. The original start does some magic (native code) that you hardly can mimic.

If you call run() directly from within your start() (or any other method), it is executed in the actual thread as a normal method, not in a new thread. There is no reason to use a Thread if you don't want to run some code in a new thread.

You must put your decision logic in the run() method, maybe using some variable set in the constructor (or another method, eventually in start) if that is really needed. I can not find any reason for needing this variable, it should be enough to test the condition in run() as already suggested elsewhere.

    class MyThread extends Thread {

        private final boolean flag;

        public MyThread(boolean someCondition) {
            flag = someCondition;
        }

    // alternative  
    //    @Override
    //    public synchronized void start() {
    //        flag = <<someCondition>>
    //        super.start();
    //    }

        @Override
        public void run() {
            if (flag) {
                // do something like super.run()
            } else {
                // do something else
            }
        }
    }

but it would be easier to understand and maintain if you do it like @Henning suggested!
It's also a more object oriented solution...

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You don't override the start, you override the "run". You can simply implement a thread by:

new Thread() {
  public void run() {
    //your code here
  }
}.start();
//start will call the logic in your run method
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1  
i have to call the logic in my start method. –  Anand Oct 28 '10 at 6:49
1  
so,please let me know how to override start() method with an example. –  Anand Oct 28 '10 at 6:51
1  
Call your logic inside run method. –  Rekin Oct 28 '10 at 7:00
1  
like what I said in the comment above, .start() will call the logic in your "run" method, so you place your code inside the run method AND I assure you it will be called when you call .start(). –  Manny Oct 28 '10 at 7:01
1  
like i have commented above i want to ensure that the specific run() method from the start() method is called.In my code there is two run() methods and I want to decide in start() method that which run() would be called. –  Anand Oct 28 '10 at 7:09

Agree with Schildmeijer, don't override start, override run() instead.

In fact, although start can be overridden (it's not final), it calls the native start0 method which in turn will cause the VM to call the run method (actually from the context of a native thread/process). The native start0 method has private access, so even if you overrode the start, I can't see how you could reproduce the affect.

The client calling start() is within a thread (lets say, the main thread), it's not until the run method has done its thing that another thread will be spawned.

Take a look at the Sun (ahem, Oracle) tutorial on threads at http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/index.html, in particular the section on starting threads.

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try{ private synchronized void start() { if (threadStatus != 0) throw new IllegalThreadStateException(); group.add(this); start0(); if (stopBeforeStart) { stop0(throwableFromStop); } this.run(); } }catch(Exception e){ System.out.println(e); } } private native void start0(); –  Anand Oct 28 '10 at 7:55
    
in ths code its giving an error that start is not resolved. Please let me know that what is the problem in this code. –  Anand Oct 28 '10 at 7:57

class Worker implements Runnable{

public void run(){ if("foo"){ runFoo(); } else { runBar(); } }

private void runFoo(){ // something }

private void runBar(){ // else }

}

I'm pretty sure, you needn't to overwrite the start-Method.

By the way: Take al look at java.util.concurrent.Callable

http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/Callable.html

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Actually, you can call run() to run a thread instead of start() to run a thread. But there is a little difference.

Suppose you create two threads:

Thread t1 = new Thread();
Thread t2 = new Thread();

Case 1 : If you call "t1.run()" and "t2.run()" one after another they will start to run t1 and t2 synchronously (sequentially).

Case 2 : If you call "t1.start()" and "t2.start()" one after another they will call their run() methods and start to run t1 and t2 asynchronously (in parallel).

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1  
Ofcourse. But what if I want to have one thread,which will run in two different ways. Means have two different run() methods based on different conditions. Then we should have to start a thread with thread.start() method and in that we should have a condition based on that different run() methods should be called. –  Anand Oct 28 '10 at 7:27

If we provide our own implementation of start method then it will work like a normal method call and will work on the current thread stack only. New thread will not be created.

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