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I wonder if when using any of the java.util.concurrent classes I still need to synchronize access on the instance so to avoid visibility issues.

In short the question is:

When using an instance of java.util.concurrent, is it possible that one thread modify the instance (i.e., put an element in a concurrent hashmap) and a subsequent thread won't be seeing the modification? (My question arises from the fact that The Java Memory Model allows threads to cache values instead of fetching them directly from memory if the access to the value is not synchronized)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You'll find the answer here: Synchronized Methods

[...] when a synchronized method exits, it automatically establishes a happens-before relationship with any subsequent invocation of a synchronized method for the same object. This guarantees that changes to the state of the object are visible to all threads.

UPDATE: Assumed the question was about synchronizing in more general terms.

On the java.util.concurrent package Memory Consistency Properties, you can check the Javadoc API for the package:

The methods of all classes in java.util.concurrent and its subpackages extend these guarantees to higher-level synchronization. In particular:

  • Actions in a thread prior to placing an object into any concurrent collection happen-before actions subsequent to the access or removal of that element from the collection in another thread.
    [...]
  • Actions prior to "releasing" synchronizer methods such as
    Lock.unlock, Semaphore.release, and
    CountDownLatch.countDown
    happen-before actions subsequent to a successful "acquiring" method such as Lock.lock, Semaphore.acquire, Condition.await, and CountDownLatch.await on the same synchronizer object in another thread.
    [...]

So, the classes in this package make sure of the concurrency, making use of a set of classes for Thread control (Lock, Semaphore, etc.). This classes handle the happen-before logic programatically, i.e. managing a FIFO stack of concurrent threads, locking and releasing current and subsequent threads (i.e. using Thread.wait() and Thread.resume(), etc.

Then, (theoretically) you don't need to synchronize your statements accesing this classes, because they are controlling concurrent threads access programatically.

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Not sure that's the "answer", that just demonstrates the spec for syncrhonized. I understood the question to be more about the need to add additional syncrhonisation..? –  Toby Oct 28 '10 at 7:40
    
You got it right Toby. I wanted to know whether I could assume that by using java.utils.concurrent classes I would not had to worry about visiblity issues, i.e., whether synchronizing is or is not necessary with these classes. –  Mirco Dotta Oct 28 '10 at 8:50
    
Ok. My fault. I misunderstood the question. –  Tomas Narros Oct 28 '10 at 9:09
    
Brilliant!! Thanks Tomas, the "Memory Consistency Property" was exactly what I needed! I'm happy I can assume that updates made on java.util.concurrent classes are garanteed to be visible. –  Mirco Dotta Oct 28 '10 at 10:37
    
I'm glad to help. –  Tomas Narros Oct 28 '10 at 10:48

I wonder if when using any of the java.util.concurrent classes I still need to synchronize access on the instance so to avoid visibility issues.

There is no single answer to this. Rather, you need to check the answer on a case-by-case basis, by carefully reading the relevant classes javadocs.

When using an instance of java.util.concurrent, is it possible that one thread modify the instance (i.e., put an element in a concurrent hashmap) and a subsequent thread won't be seeing the modification?

In the case of ConcurrentHashMap, the javadoc says the following about the behaviour of retrieval (read) operations:

"However, even though all operations are thread-safe, retrieval operations do not entail locking, and there is not any support for locking the entire table in a way that prevents all access. [...] Retrievals reflect the results of the most recently completed update operations holding upon their onset."

In other words, "No, it is not possible".

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Because the ConcurrentHashMap (for example) is designed to be used from a concurrent context, you don't need to synchronise it further. In fact, doing so could undermine the optimisations it introduces.

For example, Collections.synchronizedMap(...) represents a way to make a map thread safe, as I understand it, it works essentially by wrapping all the calls within the synchronized keyword. Something like ConcurrentHashMap on the other hand creates synchronized "buckets" across the elements in the collection, causing finer grained concurrency control and therefore giving less lock contention under heavy usage. It may also not lock on reads for example. If you wrap this again with some synchronised access, you could undermine this. Obviously, you have to be careful that all access to the collection is syncrhronised etc which is another advantage of the newer library; you don't have to worry (as much!).

The java.lang.concurrent collections may implement their thread safety via syncrhonised. in which case the language specification guarantees visibility. They may implement things without using locks. I'm not as clear on this, but I assume it the same visibility would be in place here.

If you're seeing what looks like lost updates in your code, it may be that its just a race condition. Something like the ConcurrentHashpMap will give you the most recent value on a read and the write may not have yet been written. It's often a trade off between accuracy and performance.

The point is; java.util.concurrent stuff is meant to do this stuff so I'd be confident that it ensures visibility and use of volatile and/or addition syncrhonisation shouldn't be needed.

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