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I am reading existing posts on Generics at SO. If Generics has so many advantages like Type safety, no overhead of boxing/unboxing and it is fast, why not always use it? Why would you ever use a non-generic object instead?

Edited (Question further extended below)

I am a bit confused. The last time I read about Generics, a few months ago, I read that if the Type in the parameters is variable, Generic should be used in order to prevent errors. What I seem to be reading now, though, is that Generics limit implementation to a fixed Type, while a non-generic object allows you to define parameter types at run-time.

Please help me see what I'm missing?

Secondly, using these kinds of constructs in proper OOP designs (Generics, etc.) are helpful when you are working in a team and your code is shareable. For a lone programmer with a small scale, who knows what Type has to come in the parameter, it seems like there is no need to worry, and little difference between using a Generic or Non-Generic type. Is this accurate?

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Re edit: "A non-generic thing allows to define parameter type at run-time." - no, there is no parameter to define. If anything, that sentence is backwords; a non-generic but typed argument limits you to a type, where-as a generic argument lets the caller choose - so generics get the advantage there. Otherwise you are limited mainly to object –  Marc Gravell Oct 28 '10 at 8:08
    
Re your point about team vs individual; I simply don't see any reason that makes anything different; unless you would deliberately go out of your way to make your methods less clear? If so, you could also rename them all to void A(object a, object b, object c). The better way of looking at it is simply: does this method apply to a specific type, or can the same logic be used for an arbitrary type; if the latter, generics is a good choice. –  Marc Gravell Oct 28 '10 at 8:10
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4 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In general you should - however, there are times (especially when writing library code) when it is not possible (or certainly not convenient) to know about the calling type (even in terms of T), so non-generic types (mainly interfaces such as IList, IEnumerable) are very useful. Data-binding is a good example of this. Indeed, anything that involves reflection is generally made much harder by using generics, and since (via the nature of reflection) you've already lost those benefits, you may as well just drop to non-generic code. Reflection and generics are not very good friends at all.

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I edited the question further. Have u seen that? –  RKh Oct 28 '10 at 7:56
    
@Mark Could you provide an example? –  Tymek Jul 19 '12 at 6:00
    
@Tymek I've already mentioned reflection and data-binding. Can you be more specific what you are looking for? –  Marc Gravell Jul 19 '12 at 6:24
    
@MarcGravell Yes, sorry. Could you provide an example when it is not convenient to know about the calling type even in terms of T? –  Tymek Jul 26 '12 at 3:40
2  
@Tymek we've already had the obvious data-binding (think .DataSource, where you're just passing an object as the list); non-homogeneous sets would be a good example. Another would be anything where the code is traversing the object structure (serialization, maybe) - here, any T would either just be the outermost nodes (not much help), or you'd have to have a TSomething for every member/sub-member/list/etc in the entire model (not pretty); equally, it is much easier to call GetType() and work with Type than it is to call MakeGenericMethod() to work with T. –  Marc Gravell Jul 26 '12 at 5:48
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Generics may be fast and type safe, but also add complexity (another dimension which can vary and must be understood by programmers). Who is going to maintain your code? Not every trick with generics (or lambdas, or dependency injection, or...) is worth it. Think about what problem you are going to solve, and what parts of that problem may change in the future. Design for those cases. The optimally flexible software is too complex to be maintained by mortal programmers.

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1  
Some valid general points, but I'm not sure I can see how generics adds much complexity here... indeed, in many ways it is harder to get it wrong with generics (the compiler will whine at you). –  Marc Gravell Oct 28 '10 at 7:47
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Marc, your context isn't exactly crystal clear. Adding a design element always adds complexity. Another layer of indirection, for example, doesn't in itself add a lot of complexity, but it all adds up. The question is whether added elements are worth it. Getting generics wrong while writing code is one thing: understanding code you have to maintain is quite another. If you have a business layer Order class, in what cases would you make it generic? For what parameters? The answer, unfortunately, is: it depends! –  Pontus Gagge Oct 28 '10 at 10:46
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+1 Excellent answer. One of the most important considerations when coding is whether the benefits of a certain design outweigh the cost of the added complexity. –  Igby Largeman May 14 '11 at 1:15
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Sometimes "object" collections are simply unavoidable. Often this happens when there's multiple types in the same control/collection - the only type they have in common is "object", and so that's the best type for your collection.

Another case for object (non collection related) that pops up from time to time can be seen with the PropertyGrid. A third party property grid may allow you to attach a "validator" which returns whether the users new value for a given property on the grid is acceptable. As the PropertyGrid does not know what properties it will be displaying, the best it can give the validator is an object - even though the validator knows exactly what type it will be called with.

But as per Mark's answer - most (all?) of the non generic collections in .NET are only there for legacy reasons. If .NET was remade today you can be sure the standard library would look very different.

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@Mark: My long time doubt cleared. It's good to know that non-generic things are for legacy reasons only. –  RKh Oct 28 '10 at 7:57
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@RPK: Actually, there are some other advantages to non-generic things. For example, if an class SuperCollection<T> implements IList<T> but also implements a read-only non-generic ICollection, and a SuperCollection<Giraffe> is passed to a routine that accepts an IEnumerable<Animal> and calls the Count extension method, that Count method will be able to use ICollection.Count without having to enumerate items in the list. –  supercat Jul 19 '11 at 22:17
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Generics is the way to go generally. Added complexity could be one argument against it, but imo it's totally worth considering the benefits in most cases. As a general rule of thumb, embrace it. Reflection is another case which generics makes it harder. But I avoid generics only if it doesn't make sense.

The one scenario where I like to avoid generics is making a method generic when it serves no intended purpose of generics and can be misleading. Generics was introduced for better type safety and performance (when it comes to value types). If it serves neither, then a generic approach can be misleading to developer. For example consider the snippet from this question:

public void DoSomething<T>(T request)
{
    if (request == null) 
        throw new ArgumentNullException("request");

    if (request is ISomeInterface)
        DoSomething();
    else
        DoSomethingElse();
}

There is nothing generically handled in the above method. Its even worse when you do a lot of type checking in a generic method:

public void DoSomething<T>(T request)
{
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(X))
        DoSomething();
    else if (typeof(T) == typeof(Y))
        DoSomethingElse();
    ...
}

which completely defeats the logic of generics. There are better patterns to avoid type checking, but if it is absolutely necessary, then accepting object as parameter is what I would prefer. Another similar case is when value types are anyway boxed in a generic method:

public void DoSomething<T>(T request)
{
    var type = request.GetType(); //boxed already in case of value types.

    //or other reflection calls which involves boxing
}

By seeing the method definition one is tempted to think of this method not having boxing penalties, but letting the caller know it clearly is one good way. I like it like:

public void DoSomething(object request) //boxes here
{
    var type = request.GetType(); 

    //or other reflection calls which involves boxing
}

Other than that, I prefer generics all the time.


An edge case where the two could behave differently is with dynamic.

public void Generic<T>(T request)
{
}

public void Object(object request)
{
}

dynamic d = null;
Object(d); //no issues
Generic(d); //run-time explosion; can not infer type argument

Not a factor to consider, just a silly difference in behaviour worth having in mind.

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