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I am implementing jersey restful web service to get application/json mime type from the java bean classes. Given below is the resource class code

    @GET
    @Produces({"application/json"})
    public synchronized Flights getFlightList() {
        return myFlights;
    }

Here if the return object (Flight) converts to json object only when the Flight encoding with jaxb. For normal POJO classes, it is returning nothing instead Http error ”500” is coming.

Can you please tell me if it is possible to send normal java bean object in json format? If yes, then please let me know how to get it?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you are using servlets, set the POJOMappingFeature to true in the web.xml file, and POJO conversion will be done automatically.

<servlet>
    <servlet-name>Jersey</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>com.sun.jersey.spi.container.servlet.ServletContainer</servlet-class>
    <init-param>
        <param-name>com.sun.jersey.config.property.packages</param-name>
        <param-value>my.package.name</param-value>
    </init-param>
    <init-param>
        <param-name>com.sun.jersey.api.json.POJOMappingFeature</param-name>
        <param-value>true</param-value>
    </init-param>
</servlet>
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Thanks for the reply –  shams Nov 8 '11 at 15:39
    
Interestingly enough, when I ran my code inside NetBeans, I did not have to set this init-param. But when I deployed the WAR to GlassFish, it failed without the init-parm. –  cayhorstmann Jan 15 '12 at 0:00

You may check the following example for guidance: http://download.java.net/maven/2/com/sun/jersey/samples/jacksonjsonprovider/1.6/jacksonjsonprovider-1.6-project.zip

Also read the docs to get more knowledge: http://jersey.java.net/nonav/documentation/latest/json.html#d4e894

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Thanks for the reply –  shams Nov 8 '11 at 15:39

The default registered JSON serialization provider works using the same annotations as JAXB (which itself handles XML serialization). This is usually an advantage as it means that you only need to put one set of annotations on, and don't have to write any direct serialization code yourself of course.

But it is possible to do more of the serialization work yourself.

@Produces("application/json")
@Provider
public class FlightsWriter implements MessageBodyWriter<Flights> {
    public boolean isWriteable(Class<?> type, Type genericType,
                Annotation[] annotations, MediaType mediaType) {
        return type instanceof Flights; // Simplest possible
    }
    public long getSize(Flights flights,
                Class<?> type, Type genericType,
                Annotation[] annotations, MediaType mediaType) {
        return -1; // Or real size if you can work it out!
    }
    public void writeTo(Flights flights,
                Class<?> type, Type genericType,
                Annotation[] annotations, MediaType mediaType,
                MultivaluedMap<String,Object> httpHeaders,
                OutputStream entityStream) throws IOException,
                WebApplicationException {
        // Put your code to write the JSON here...
    }
}

Be aware, it's a lot of work which is why most people use the built-in engine and add JAXB annotations.

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Thanks for the reply –  shams Nov 8 '11 at 15:39

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