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Is it possible to easily get the size of a folder on the SD card? I use a folder for caching of images, and would like to present the total size of all cached images. Is there a way to this other than iterating over each file? They all reside inside the same folder?

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8 Answers 8

Just go through all files and sum the length of them:

/**
 * Return the size of a directory in bytes
 */
private static long dirSize(File dir) {

    if (dir.exists()) {
        long result = 0;
        File[] fileList = dir.listFiles();
        for(int i = 0; i < fileList.length; i++) {
            // Recursive call if it's a directory
            if(fileList[i].isDirectory()) {
                result += dirSize(fileList [i]);
            } else {
                // Sum the file size in bytes
                result += fileList[i].length();
            }
        }
        return result; // return the file size
    }
    return 0;
}

NOTE: Function written by hand so it could not compile!

EDITED: recursive call fixed.

EDITED: dirList.length changed to fileList.length.

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You might want to replace findFile by dirSize :) –  Maurits Rijk Oct 28 '10 at 8:23
    
i suggest to replace dir.exists() with dir.isDirectory(). if a file is given as argument NullPointerException is thrown due to listFiles() result. –  tux_mind Dec 20 '13 at 17:14
/**
 * Try this one for better performance
 * Mehran
 * Return the size of a directory in bytes
 **/

private static long dirSize(File dir) {
    long result = 0;

    Stack<File> dirlist= new Stack<File>();
    dirlist.clear();

    dirlist.push(dir);

    while(!dirlist.isEmpty())
    {
        File dirCurrent = dirlist.pop();

        File[] fileList = dirCurrent.listFiles();
        for(File f: fileList){
            if(f.isDirectory())
                dirlist.push(f);
            else
                result += f.length();
        }
    }

    return result;
}
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2  
Since we're talking about file operations, the recursion is unlikely to account for much of the performance hit. Also, the java.util.Stack implementation is very slow. I tried to optimize a recursive algorithm with it and it was actually slower then to let the JVM do its job. –  Kevin Coulombe Dec 12 '11 at 5:21
    
java.util.Stack class methods are synchronized. If you really want to avoid recursion it's better to use LinkedList. –  Roman Mazur Feb 12 '13 at 14:06

Here's some code that avoids recursion, and also calculates the physical size instead of the logical size:

  public static long getFileSize(final File file)
    {
    if(file==null||!file.exists())
      return 0;
    if(!file.isDirectory())
      return file.length();
    final List<File> dirs=new LinkedList<File>();
    dirs.add(file);
    long result=0;
    while(!dirs.isEmpty())
      {
      final File dir=dirs.remove(0);
      if(!dir.exists())
        continue;
      final File[] listFiles=dir.listFiles();
      if(listFiles==null||listFiles.length==0)
        continue;
      for(final File child : listFiles)
        {
        result+=child.length();
        if(child.isDirectory())
          dirs.add(child);
        }
      }
    return result;
    }
  }
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this is absolutely right answer for calculating size of FILE/FOLDER –  Pir Fahim Shah May 8 at 13:43
    
I was actually surprised to see that (on Android) each folder takes about 4KB even when it's empty. wonder why they did it this way. –  android developer May 8 at 15:07

Problem with other solution is that they provide you only logical size of all files in specified directory. It will be different from actual (physical) used space. If your directory has a lot of subdirectories and/or small files, there may be a huge difference between logical and actual size of directory.

Here is what I found how to take in count physical structure of FS.

public static long getDirectorySize(File directory, long blockSize) {
    File[] files = directory.listFiles();
    if (files != null) {

        // space used by directory itself 
        long size = file.length();

        for (File file : files) {
            if (file.isDirectory()) {
                // space used by subdirectory
                size += getDirectorySize(file, blockSize);
            } else {
                // file size need to rounded up to full block sizes
                // (not a perfect function, it adds additional block to 0 sized files
                // and file who perfectly fill their blocks) 
                size += (file.length() / blockSize + 1) * blockSize;
            }
        }
        return size;
    } else {
        return 0;
    }
}

You can use StatFs to get block size:

public static long getDirectorySize(File directory) {
    StatFs statFs = new StatFs(directory.getAbsolutePath());
    long blockSize;
    if (Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= Build.VERSION_CODES.JELLY_BEAN_MR2) {
        blockSize = statFs.getBlockSizeLong()
    } else {
        blockSize = statFs.getBlockSize();
    }

    return getDirectorySize(directory, blockSize);
}
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I've noticed that if I call "length()" on a directory, I don't get 0, but a real number. Is it possible that instead of using what you've done you can just use "length()" on the directories (and of course do the rest- adding the size of normal files) ? –  android developer Apr 30 at 22:10

you should use this code:

public static long getFolderSize(File f) {
    long size = 0;
    if (f.isDirectory()) {
        for (File file : f.listFiles()) {    
            size += getFolderSize(file);
        }
    } else {
        size=f.length();
    }
    return size;
}
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Iterating through all files is less than 5 lines of code and the only reasonable way to do this. If you want to get ugly you could also run a system command (Runtime.getRuntime().exec("du");) and catch the output ;)

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1  
Fair enough. Just figured it was such a common use case that there should be some native solution. Laziness is good ... Five lines later, and I'm happy :) –  Gunnar Lium Oct 28 '10 at 8:38
    
In Clojure: (defn dir-size [dir] (reduce + (map #(.length %) (.listFiles (new File dir))))) –  Maurits Rijk Oct 28 '10 at 12:19
    
I don't think it's safe to rely on du being available and executable. –  David Caunt Mar 14 '11 at 11:04
    
How exactly does one fire the "du" command? I tried - Runtime.getRuntime().exec("/system/bin/du -b -d1 "+dir.getCanonicalPath(), new String[]{}, Environment.getRootDirectory()); didnt work. Nor did - (Runtime.getRuntime().exec("du")) –  Amey Jul 7 '11 at 19:53

below method return you size of folder:-

public static long getFolderSize(File dir) {
long size = 0;
for (File file : dir.listFiles()) {
    if (file.isFile()) {
        // System.out.println(file.getName() + " " + file.length());
        size += file.length();
    } else
        size += getFolderSize(file);
}
return size;
}

call above method :-

File file = new File(Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory().getPath()+"/urfoldername/");

long folder_size=getFolderSize(file);

return you size of folder.

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The way of #Moss is right. This is my code for those who want to change bytes to human readable format. You just need to assign path of your folder to dirSize(String path) and get human readable format based on byte, kilo, mega and etc.

private static String dirSize(String path) {

        File dir = new File(path);

        if(dir.exists()) {
            long bytes = getFolderSize(dir);
            if (bytes < 1024) return bytes + " B";
            int exp = (int) (Math.log(bytes) / Math.log(1024));
            String pre = ("KMGTPE").charAt(exp-1) + "";

            return String.format("%.1f %sB", bytes / Math.pow(1024, exp), pre);
        }

        return "0";
    }

    public static long getFolderSize(File dir) {
        if (dir.exists()) {
            long result = 0;
            File[] fileList = dir.listFiles();
            for(int i = 0; i < fileList.length; i++) {
                // Recursive call if it's a directory
                if(fileList[i].isDirectory()) {
                    result += getFolderSize(fileList[i]);
                } else {
                    // Sum the file size in bytes
                    result += fileList[i].length();
                }
            }
            return result; // return the file size
        }
        return 0;
    } 
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