Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a slow function that does an AJAX request:

function X(param1,param2){
var params={
    type: "POST",
    url: "./ajax/useful.php",
    data: "param1="+param1+"&param2="+param2,
    success: function(msg){
      //do something
    }
  };
  var result=$.ajax(params).responseText;
}

Everything works fine when I call X("asdf","qwerty").

Now, what I want to do is to be able to call function X as follows:

function X(param1,param2,function(){alert('hi');}){
var params={
    type: "POST",
    url: "./ajax/useful.php",
    data: "param1="+param1+"&param2="+param2,
    success: function(msg){
      /////
      //I want to be able call the function in the 3rd parameter (alert in this case)
      /////
    }
  };
  var result=$.ajax(params).responseText;
}

Now you might say why don't I just call alert('hi') directly inside the success. Sure I can do this, but I want to be able to vary what goes on inside the called function (not just a simple alert('hi'), depending on who's calling X.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You declare your X function like this:

function X(param1,param2,callback){

...use the callback like this:

success: function(msg){
    callback();
}

...and call X like this:

X('a', 'b', function(){alert('hi');});

This works because your success handler is a closure over the data within your X function, including its arguments. It has a live reference to that information (even after X returns), and so later when the Ajax call completes, it can still use the callback argument. More on closures here: Closures are not complicated

share|improve this answer
    
Legend, that should work. I wasn't sure of the syntax. Thanks so much, –  Eamorr Oct 28 '10 at 12:10
function X(param1,param2,f){
var params={
    type: "POST",
    url: "./ajax/useful.php",
    data: "param1="+param1+"&param2="+param2,
    success: function(msg){
      f();
    }
  };
  var result=$.ajax(params).responseText;
}

should work. You can no call X like this:

X(param1,param2,function(){dowhatever})
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks for the reply. T.J. Crowder, above, came up with a good way of calling X whilst taking full advantage of anonymous functions. –  Eamorr Oct 28 '10 at 12:14
    
@Eamorr my code is exactly the same the only difference is that ` callback ` is named ` f ` in my code :) –  joni Oct 28 '10 at 12:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.