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i was totally surprised that the 3rd solution doesn't work (Compiler says: ; is missing).

bool isFoobar = true;

isFoobar == true ? isFoobar = false : isFoobar = true; // [1] works
( isFoobar ? isFoobar = false : isFoobar = true ); // [2] works
isFoobar ? isFoobar = false : isFoobar = true; // [3] failed

Ehm, why does the last one not work?

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You need comparison to work properly: isFoobar == true or some expression that returns bool value –  infinity Oct 28 '10 at 12:30
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this is not true infinity - the ternary operator takes a boolean to decide which case to assign, same with if. bool == true is code smell - you don't need to check if a boolean is true or false, because the result of the comparision will be the boolean itself. –  Femaref Oct 28 '10 at 12:33
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Could you edit this to show a complete code block where your two "work"ing examples actually compile? –  AakashM Oct 28 '10 at 12:34
    
@AakashM no i can't, because they don't compile. I never compiled it like i see a moment ago. It was just the syntax-checker. If i would have compiled it, i had seen the problem myself :D –  Viper Oct 28 '10 at 12:44
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7 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When I try the code, neither of those work. You can't use an expression like that as a statement.

If you use the expressions as expressions, all three work:

bool isFoobar = true;
bool x;

x = isFoobar == true ? isFoobar = false : isFoobar = true;
x = ( isFoobar ? isFoobar = false : isFoobar = true );
x = isFoobar ? isFoobar = false : isFoobar = true;

If you only want to use it as a shortcut for if, and don't want to use the result, you are using it the wrong way. The conditional operator should be used for expressions, not instead of an if statement.

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You are using it the wrong way. The ternary operator is there to assign a variable based upon a predicate, not to execute code in the two cases.

  var obj = predicate ? true_case : false_case; //if predicate is true, true_case will be assigned to obj.
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This. The ternary operator is not a universal if-else shortcut as the question title suggests. –  Core Xii Oct 28 '10 at 12:46
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If statement is only like below:

isFoobar ? isFoobar = false : isFoobar = true;

It gives same error as in the question,

If statement is like:

isFoobar ? (isFoobar = false) : (isFoobar = true);

Error: Only assignment, call, increment, decrement, and new object expressions can be used as a statement

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You are mistaken - none of them compile. Try commenting out the third line and see what happens. The true/false part of the ternary statement needs to return a value, which you are not doing.

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A better solution is:

isFoobar = !isFoobar;
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I don't think he meant that he is trying to negate isFooBar he's just using it as a short example of the ternary operator failing unexpectedly. –  josh.trow Oct 28 '10 at 12:39
    
He wasn't using the ternary statement properly in the first place. I merely gave an alternative solution to his example. If isFoobar was true, make it false, and vice versa. –  Evan Mulawski Oct 28 '10 at 12:43
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None of those is correct. I get compiler errors with them all.

The correct syntax is:

isFoobar = isFoobar ? false : true;

update

The errors I get with your statements are:

1 & 2:

Only assignment, call, increment, decrement, and new object expressions can be used as a statement

3:

Invalid expression term ':'

; expected

; expected

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you are right! i don't make the assignment to the variable and then all three variants are working. doh! –  Viper Oct 28 '10 at 12:38
    
would the down voter care to comment? What have I said wrong? –  Matt Ellen Oct 28 '10 at 12:53
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under .net 3.5 this work and compile

        bool isFoobar = true;

        var a = isFoobar == true ? isFoobar = false : isFoobar = true; // [1] works
        var b = ( isFoobar ? isFoobar = false : isFoobar = true ); // [2] works
        var c = isFoobar ? isFoobar = false : isFoobar = true; // [3] works

a, b and c are type boolean

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Yep, none of those 3 lines were valid C# in the original question. –  Steve Haigh Oct 28 '10 at 12:38
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