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I've got an app that I've developed for the iPhone, but now want to port to the iPad. The iPhone app is navigation style and based on discrete table view controllers managed by a nav controller. The larger screen real estate of the iPad means that I can comfortably fit a couple of these table view controllers on to the screen at the same time.

The question is how? Should I

a) have the main view load two table view controllers from separate NIBs and then position them on screen (I'm not sure how I set they x and y of subviews loaded from nibs).

b) create sub-views in my main nib and populate these with data from my existing classes (if so how do I hook up the IBOutlets)?

c) do something completely different

One thing I should point out is that I don't want to use the split screen option.

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The question is quite confusing, but you should keep in the the Apple HIG and why they were created. The consistency of the UI in Apple Products are what make the iOS application eco-system easy to adpot for its customers. If you create a UI that is inconsistent with how a user would expect an Apple product to function, it could negatively impact the perception of you application –  Aaron Saunders Oct 29 '10 at 12:41
    
Sorry if I didn't make myself clear. I'm not trying to do anything that would be counter-intuitive from a HIG perspective, it's just that the iPad opens more scope for creating unique user interfaces. –  Phil John Oct 29 '10 at 13:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Alert! This QA is now of historic value only.

It is now trivial to do this sort of thing with container views in iOS, which is why Apple edited them:

http://stackoverflow.com/a/25910881/294884

Objective C - how to add a subview that has its own UIViewController


Historic answer...

".. how I set they x and y of subviews loaded from nibs?"

I'm not sure if I fully understand your question Phil, but here's an easy and clear way:

Fire up interface builder and in the new larger iPad view, simply add new smaller views (UIViews)... Put them exactly where and how you want them. We are going to call these "basket" views.

Let's say one of your complicated views from the other app is your fatDogs view. Call the new basket view fatDogsBasket. Then in the code, in viewDidLoad, just do the following with all these "baskets"...

[fatDogsBasket addSubview:fatDogs.view];
[clientsBasket addSubview:clients.view];
[namesBasket addSubview:names.view];
[flashingLightsBasket addSubview:flashingLights.view];
// etc

You're done! (Obviously, make sure that the relevant view controllers, fatDogs, flashingLights and so on, are all ready to go and instantiated.)

The "basket" system is handy since each one will hold your previous work in one place; usefully you can (say) set overall invisibility or whatever just by touching the baskets. Obviously, if you want to set, or maybe move, the position of a basket in the code, just go

happyBasket.frame = CGRectMake(509,413,
    happyBasket.frame.size.width,
    happyBasket.frame.size.height);

UIViews in iOS are very lightweight, so it's no problem at all adding another layer of UIViews.

I hope this is what you were getting at!

------Later...

You went on to ask: "Just to make sure I'm clear on the right way to implement this. The main view controller has IBOutlets for each of the 'baskets' and its this IBOutlet connection to the subview that I'm calling. Each of the view controllers that I'm going to show in each basket has it's own nib and associated IBOutlets. Right? –"

So, "The main view controller has IBOutlets for each of the 'baskets'"...

Right, the main view in the new app, would have lines like this in the .h file:

IBOutlet  UIView  *fatDogsBasket;

Note that you are simply declaring "fastDogsBasket" to be a UIView. You shouldn't worry too much about the "IBOutlet" word. All that means is "I need to be able to look this item up, over in the interface controller." It's important to realise IT DOES NOTHING.

So yes all the "baskets" will be UIViews and hence of course you must delare them as such in the .h file of your main view controller. Personally is would not use the phrase "a view controller has IBOutlets." It sort of confuses things and gives the wrong idea. Just say "don't forget to mark the UIViews as iboutlets in the header file."

So anyway yes that's exactly what you do, declare all the "basket" UIViews in the .h file of the main controller, and indeed mark them all as IBOutlets so that interface builder will work more easily. Next ..

"its this IBOutlet connection to the subview that I'm calling" -- that's wrong.

The basket such as fatDogsBasket IS SIMPLY A UIVIEW and that's that. It's just a UIView.

Now, as you know you can put UIViews inside other UIViews. (Obviously, this is commonplace, every UIView has scores of UIViews inside it and so on and on - it's the most basic part of building up an interface.)

So, what are you going to put inside your fatDogsBasket uiview? You're going to put in ALL YOUR PREVIOUS WORK on fatDogs! Previously (for the iFone) you wrote a wonderful class - a view controller - called fatDogs. (It may well have even had many subclasses and so on.)

We're now going to take the view from fatDogs (of course, that is fatDogs.view) and literally put it inside fatDogsBasket. (Recall that fatDogsBasket is a UIView.)

So firstly you would have to completely include your amazing class fatDogs (from the old project) in your new project. Click "add existing flies/classes" or something like that...you'll figure it out. Yes, add all the class files, xibs, any subclasses and so on.

Then, simply do this .. in your new super-powerful uber-controller, in viewDidLoad, just do the following with all the "baskets"...

[fatDogsBasket addSubview:fatDogs.view];
[clientsBasket addSubview:clients.view];
[namesBasket addSubview:names.view];
[flashingLightsBasket addSubview:flashingLights.view];
// etc

You're done! Note that the view from fatDogs (ie, fatDogs.view) is now displaying inside of the UIView fatDogsBasket. The class fatDogs will now work completely normally, just as it did in the old days! And incredibly, you can easily (here in your new controller) do things like simply move fatDogsBasket, and it will move the fatDogs view easily all at once, without worrying about the details of fatDogs and it's views.

Finally you ask..

"Each of the view controllers that I'm going to show in each basket has it's own nib and associated IBOutlets."

Exactly correct. When you add your old system "fatDogs" to the new project, you will be adding all of it's xib files and so on. Anyting that happens or doesn't happen inside those classes, to do with perhaps buttons or anything else marked as iboutlets, or anything else, will just still be the same within those classes. I'm pretty sure absolutely NOTHING will change when you use those old classes in your new project.

Just for the record .. "Each of the view controllers that I'm going to show in each basket.." Just to be accurate, you don't really show as such a viewcontroller, you show the view of the viewcontroller (!!). In other words, for fatDogs (a view controller) you will be showing it's view, which is, simply enough, referred to as fatDogs.view. ("view" is, of course, a property of any UIViewController, so you can just say vcName.view and you're done.)

Hope it helps!

And finally you ask .................................

"I've got it compiling OK, but my baskets are showing up empty, i.e. they're not showing the views of the view controllers that I've imported."

  1. Tell is the name of one of your UIViewController classes from the old project, so we can be specific

  2. Let's say you have an old UIViewController called HappyThing. So you will very likely have a file HappyThing.h and a file HappyThing.m and a file HappyThing.xib.

  3. put all those in the new project, you must do so using Add->Existing Files. (Control on one of your current filenames in the list on the left in XCode.)

  4. You will have to do this #import "HappyThing.h" somewhere or other in your new project - either in your Prefix.pch file or at the top of your new UIControllerView

  5. To be clear in HappyThing.h you will have a line of code @interface HappyThing : UIViewController

  6. In your new UIViewController.h file, you will have to add a new variable, we'll call it xxx,

    HappyThing *xxx;

Note that the type of xxx is HappyThing. (Note that as a rule, you would use the naming convention "happyThing" (note the lowercase "h") rather than "xxx", but it's just a variable and I want it to be clear to you that it's just a variable.)

  1. Next! At the moment it's just a variable that is not pointing to anything, it's nothing. (Just as if you said "int x", but then did not actually say "x = 3" or whatever.) So! In your code you have to actually instantiate xxx.

    xxx = [[HappyThing alloc] init]; [xxxBasket addSubview:xxx.view];

Note that the first line is what makes an instance of HappyThing come in to existence. And of course, you want to use "xxx" to point to that instance.

The second line puts the view in to the relevant basket! Note that of course what you want is the view associated with xxx (ie, xxx.view) ... remember that xxx is a UIViewController, it is not itself a UIView. The associated UIView is "xxx.view". (The view is literally just a property of xxx.)

  1. Memory management! Note that you used "alloc" to bring xxx in to existence. This means you DO own it, and of course that means YOU DO NOT need to send a retain there. Furthermore, since you do own it, that means You eventually have to RELEASE it. (easy ... [xxx release];)

So simply add the line [xxx release]; to the dealloc routine in your new UIViewController. (Really it won't cause any harm if you forget to do this, but do it anyway.) Conceivably you may want to release it earlier for some reason once you are more comfortable with the process.

(I was just working on a project with a huge number of huge tables, popovers and the like, so I only made them on the fly and got rid of them as soon as possible, to use less memory. But all of that is irrelevant to you at this stage.)

So now you should SEE IT ON THE SCREEN!

Don't forget if you previously had some routine in HappyThing, which you had to call to start it working (perhaps "beginProcessing" or something), you'll have to call that yourself from the new UIViewController. Hence perhaps something like:

xxx = [[HappyThing alloc] init];
[xxxBasket addSubview:xxx.view];
[xxx beginProcessing];
[xxx showAmazingRedFlashingLights]; // or whatever

Finally you asked ...

"When you've use this technique, do you simply include the headers of the imported files in your main view controller, or do you forward class them in some way?"

That was not your problem, your problem was that you were not instantiating it with the line xxx = [[HappyThing alloc] init];. So, good luck!

Regarding the line of code "@class HapyyThing", if you want to simply put it just above the start of the definition of your new UIControllerView. Generally you don't have to if you have your include line in the best place. Anyway it is an unrelated issue. It simply won't compile if your new UIViewController, can't find HappyThing. Enjoy!

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Thanks. I guessed that there must be a solution of this sort, but I was struggling to figure out how to implement it. –  Phil John Oct 29 '10 at 14:03
    
Just to make sure I'm clear on the right way to implement this. The main view controller has IBOutlets for each of the 'baskets' and its this IBOutlet connection to the subview that I'm calling. Each of the view controllers that I'm going to show in each basket has it's own nib and associated IBOutlets. Right? –  Phil John Oct 29 '10 at 15:10
    
Hi Joe, Thanks for the excellent answer. I may not have been very clear in my question but you understood what I was getting at. I've got it compiling OK, but my baskets are showing up empty, i.e. they're not showing the views of the view controllers that I've imported. When you've use this technique, do you simply include the headers of the imported files in your main view controller, or do you forward class them in some way? –  Phil John Nov 1 '10 at 11:15
    
Joe, Many thanks again. You're right I wasn't instantiating it. –  Phil John Nov 1 '10 at 13:00

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