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I have the following collection of nodes and edges. What I want to do is to find all the distinct graph from it.

my %connections=(36=>[31],10=>[3,4],31=>[30,22],30=>[20],22=>[20,8],20=>[1],8=>[5],5=>[2],2=>[1,20],  3=>[7]);

In this example it will yield:

my %all_graph = {
   graph1 => {36=>[31],31=>[30,22],30=>[20],22=>[20,8],20=>[1],8=>[5],5=>[2],2=>[1,20]}.
   graph2  => {10=>[3,4],  3=>[7]} 
};

Is there any existing algorithms that does that? alt text

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2  
This is what you are looking for: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  ivancho Oct 28 '10 at 15:05
2  
Your graph is wrong. 2 should be connected to 1 –  DVK Oct 28 '10 at 15:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Use the Graph module:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict; use warnings;

use Graph;

my %connections = (
    36 => [ 31 ],
    10 => [ 3, 4],
    31 => [ 30, 22],
    30 => [ 20 ],
    22 => [ 20, 8],
    20 => [ 1 ],
    8  => [ 5 ],
    5  => [ 2 ],
    2  => [ 1, 20 ],
    3  => [ 7 ]
);

my $g = Graph->new( undirected => 1 );

for my $src ( keys %connections ) {
    for my $tgt ( @{ $connections{$src} } ) {
        $g->add_edge($src, $tgt);
    }
}

my @subgraphs = $g->connected_components;
my @allgraphs;

for my $subgraph ( @subgraphs ) {
    push @allgraphs, {};
    for my $node ( @$subgraph ) {
        if ( exists $connections{ $node } ) {
            $allgraphs[-1]{$node} = [ @{ $connections{$node} } ];
        }
    }
}

use YAML; print Dump \@allgraphs;

Output:

[sinan@archardy SO]$ ./g
---
- 2:
    - 1
    - 20
  20:
    - 1
  22:
    - 20
    - 8
  30:
    - 20
  31:
    - 30
    - 22
  36:
    - 31
  5:
    - 2
  8:
    - 5
- 10:
    - 3
    - 4
  3:
    - 7
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1  
+1 for the correct answer and YAML's Dump, which I didn't know of! –  Pedro Silva Oct 28 '10 at 18:06
1  
Amen........... –  DVK Oct 28 '10 at 23:44

To find the connected components of an undirected graph you just do a BFS or DFS (Breadth/Depth first search).

Here some sample BFS code

my %connections=(36=>[31],10=>[3,4],31=>[30,22],30=>[20],22=>[20,8]
                ,20=>[1],8=>[5],5=>[2],2=>[1,20],  3=>[7]);
my $full_connections = {}; # Build a REAL graph with full 2-way edge lists
foreach my $node (keys %connections) {
    foreach my $node2 (@{ $connections{$node} }) {
        print "$node, $node2\n";
        $full_connections->{$node}->{$node2} = 1;
        $full_connections->{$node2}->{$node} = 1;
    }
}

my %all_graph = ();
my $current_graph = 0;
my %visited = ();
my @to_visit = ();
foreach my $node (keys %$full_connections) {
    next if exists $visited{$node};
    # start the next segment
    $current_graph++;
    @to_visit=($node);
    while (@to_visit) {
        $node_to_visit = shift @to_visit;
        #next if $visited{$node_to_visit};
        $visited{$node_to_visit} = $current_graph;
        push @to_visit, grep { !exists $visited{$_} }
                              keys %{ $full_connections->{$node_to_visit} };
    }
}

# Now reconstruct %all_graph from %visited - left as exercise for the reader
print Data::Dumper->Dump([\%visited]);
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Or, one could use Graph; ;-) –  Sinan Ünür Oct 28 '10 at 16:05
2  
@Sinan - Pah! Code reuse is for the weak and timid. Real Klingons roll their own! –  DVK Oct 28 '10 at 16:13

I'd suggest the following algorithm:

1.) Move all nodes into a working set N.

2.) Starting with an arbitrary node perform a graph search (depth-first or breadth-first). Add all visited nodes and edges to the first subgraph, remove visited nodes from N

3.) If N is non-empty, select the next starting node and go to step 2.) for the next subgraph.

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