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How do you break out of a foreach loop while within a switch block?

Normally, you use break but if you use a break within a switch block it will just get you out of a switch block and the foreach loop will continue execution:

foreach (var v in myCollection)
{
    switch (v.id)
    {
        case 1:
            if (true)
            {
                break;
            }
            break;
        case 2;
            break
    }
}

What I'm currently doing when I need to break out of the foreach while within the switch block is setting a bool value placed outside of the loop to true and checking the value of this bool every time the foreach is entered and before entering the switch block. Something like this:

bool exitLoop;
foreach (var v in myCollection)
{
    if (exitLoop) break;
    switch (v.id)
    {
        case 1:
            if (true)
            {
                exitLoop = true;
                break;
            }
            break;
        case 2;
            break
    }
}

This works but I keep thinking there must be a better way of doing this I am unaware of...

EDIT: Wonder why this was not implemented in .NET the really neat way it works in PHP as mentioned by @jon_darkstar?

$i = 0;
while (++$i) {
    switch ($i) {
    case 5:
        echo "At 5<br />\n";
        break 1;  /* Exit only the switch. */
    case 10:
        echo "At 10; quitting<br />\n";
        break 2;  /* Exit the switch and the while. */
    default:
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Not sure if a better way exists, but it would be similar to having to break out of an outer loop while being inside the inner loop. So far, I haven't found anyway to do that and hence using a flag value seems to be the only way. –  Shamim Hafiz Oct 28 '10 at 16:08

10 Answers 10

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Your solution is pretty much the most common option in this case. That being said, I'd put your exit check at the end:

bool exitLoop;
foreach (var v in myCollection)
{
    switch (v.id)
    {
        case 1:
            if (true)
            {
                exitLoop = true;
            }
            break;
        case 2;
            break
    }

    // This saves an iteration of the foreach...
    if (exitLoop) break;
}

The other main option is to refactor your code, and pull the switch statement and foreach loop out into a separate method. You could then just return from inside the switch statement.

share|improve this answer

The boolean is one way. Another is using labels and goto. I know folks consider goto to be a cardinal sin, but used judiciously (VERY judiciously), it can be useful. In this case, place a label just past the end of the foreach loop. When you want to exit the loop, simply goto that label. For example:

foreach(var v in myCollection) {
    switch(v.Id) {
        case 1:
            if(true) {
                goto end_foreach;
            }
            break;
        case 2:
            break;
    }
}
end_foreach:
// ... code after the loop

EDIT: some people have mentioned taking the loop out into a separate method so that you can use return. I see the benefit of this as it doesn't require goto and it also simplifies the original function that contained the loop. However, if the loop is simple and is the primary purpose of the function that contains it, or if the loop makes use of out or ref variables, then it's probably best to just leave it in place and use the goto. In fact, because the goto and the label stand out, it probably makes the code clearer rather than clunkier. Putting it in a separate function could make simple code harder to read.

share|improve this answer
4  
Do not use goto. It makes code more complicated. Extract method is much better. –  Andrew Bezzub Oct 28 '10 at 16:13
2  
It'd better if you'd state why goto makes code more complicated, especially when the alternative is just as complicated and moves code away from its original context. –  siride Oct 28 '10 at 16:15
6  
I think having a thousand little functions obscures the big picture. I know it's all the rage in the hardcore OO circles, but I find spelunking through a bunch of functions whose existence is motivated purely by reasons like "never use goto" to be considerable more difficult than dealing with a single slightly longer, but coherent function. –  siride Oct 28 '10 at 16:18
3  
@Andrew Making a short function which is only ever called from exactly one place for the sole purpose of being able to return mid-function is hardly a better solution than goto. You have yet to justify your anti-goto sentiments beyond regurgitating popular opinion. –  meagar Oct 28 '10 at 16:29
2  
I'm pretty sure .NET architects would not include goto in the framework if they didn't feel there was a legitimate use for it and although this could be just such a case I'd still rather go with pulling the loop into a separate method as an alternative to using a flag... –  Dean K. Oct 28 '10 at 16:44

You could extract your foreach cycle to the separate method and use return statement. Or you could do like this:

        foreach (object collectionElement in myCollection)
        {
            if (ProcessElementAndDetermineIfStop(collectionElement))
            {
                break;
            }
        }

        private bool ProcessElementAndDetermineIfStop(object collectionElement)
        {
            switch (v.id)
            {
                case 1:
                    return true; // break cycle.
                case 2;
                    return false; // do not break cycle.
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
    
+1, this is much cleaner –  Dan Bryant Oct 28 '10 at 21:20

Honestly? This is perhaps the only situation where it is completely valid and proper to use goto:

foreach (var v in myCollection) {
    switch (v.id) {
        case 1:
            if (true)
                // document why we're using goto
                goto finished;
            break;
        case 2;
            break
    }
}
finished: // document why I'm here
share|improve this answer
2  
Why use goto? It is much better to extract method. Each time you use goto statement a kitten dies. –  Andrew Bezzub Oct 28 '10 at 16:07
1  
Why extract method when you can just goto? It's six in one, half dozen the other, really. If the loop is small enough to belong in a single function in the first place, it seems a bit odd to refactor it out solely to avoid a clean and clear goto. –  siride Oct 28 '10 at 16:08
    
Because using goto causes pain. Your methods should as short as possible. And if they are you will never need goto statement. –  Andrew Bezzub Oct 28 '10 at 16:11
2  
@Andrew miss-use of goto causes pain, the same can be said for any and every language construct. –  meagar Oct 28 '10 at 16:13
2  
What pain does it cause? return and break do effectively the same thing except there is no explicit label, potentially making the code less readable. The anti-goto canard needs to die. It's fine to rail against it from the days before procedural programming when people would truly write spaghetti code with nothing but gotos. Now that we mostly use higher-level constructs, the occasional goto is not a problem at all. The anti-goto hysteria is nothing more than cargo cult programming, AFAIC. –  siride Oct 28 '10 at 16:14

There's always the option of restructuring your code so that you can return from the switch statement.

share|improve this answer

It's not really different from your exitLoop flag, but it might be more readable if you extract a method...

foreach (var v in myCollection)
{
    if(!DoStuffAndContinue(v))
        break;
}


bool DoStuffAndContinue(MyType v)
{
    switch (v.id)
    {
        case 1:
            if (ShouldBreakOutOfLoop(v))
            {
                return false;
            }
            break;
        case 2;
            break;
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer

Lame, I know, but that's all you can do about it.

You could always transform it into a while loop and add 'exitLoop' as a condition which must be met. Inside the switch, you can call continue to skip the rest of the current pass and since you would have set exitLoop to false, it'd exit much like break would do. Even though it's not exactly what you're asking, perhaps it's more elegant that way?

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Based on MSDN documentation on the break statement, it only allows to stop the top-most scope.

This case is one where you could use a goto statement to leave your foreach loop. If you don't want to use a goto statement, your solution seems to be the best one.

As a side note, you could improve your code by testing the exitLoop flag at the end of the iteration, saving the cost of one enumerator call.

share|improve this answer
    
Which I find quite unfortunate, especially since Java allows you to break out of multi-level loop/switch constructs with, e.g., "break 2" syntax. –  siride Oct 28 '10 at 16:15

Some languages (i know PHP is one, not sure about others) allow you to specify how many control structures you'd like to break out of with

break n;
where 1 is implied if you just do break

break 2 would do what you describe, were it available in C#. I don't believe that's the case so your exit flag is probably the best solution.

share|improve this answer
    
I really like the way this was solved in PHP... –  Dean K. Oct 28 '10 at 22:15
    
yeah, im not much for using break but it is pretty cool –  jon_darkstar Oct 29 '10 at 2:08

Transform the switch() statement into a "if() else if() [...] else" series of statements so that the break exits from the foreach() loop.

share|improve this answer
    
There are always several options to replace one method with another. But that does not answer the question. The Question is : How do you break out of a foreach loop while within a switch block? –  moskito-x Oct 28 '12 at 14:57

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